School of Accounting, Finance and Economics (SAFE)

Course Descriptions

Note: UU100 and UU114 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements, before students progress to the 200-level courses. UU200 and UU204 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements, before students progress to the 300-level courses. Only approved programmes may be exempt from this requirement.

 


AF100            Introduction to Accounting & Financial Management for the Non-Specialist        


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course cannot be credited to any programme in conjunction with AF101 or AF102. This course covers the principles of compilation of standard financial reports and their use in assessing an organisation`s financial strengths and weaknesses. It considers the contribution that accounting can make to the good management of an organisation as a tool for planning, control and decision making. It also considers the nature of, and the markets for, organisation finance.


AF101            Introduction to Accounting & Financial Management 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: O at C

This course cannot be credited to any programme in conjunction with AF100. The accounting system as a formal information system. Accounting conventions. An introduction to the analysis of the concepts of accounting, especially revenue, expenses, income, assets, depreciation, valuation, liabilities and proprietorship. Introduction to accounting for partnerships and companies. A study of the accounting process from data collection to report preparation, presentation and analysis and interpretation.


AF102            Introduction to Accounting & Financial Management 2


Prerequisites: AF101

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course cannot be credited to any programme in conjunction with AF100. This course provides an introduction to the processing of accounting data for reporting to management. Budgets, cost concepts, classifications and accumulation, and accounting information systems will be introduced in the context of the management planning and control functions in the private sector and government, government agencies, and non-profit making organisations.


AF108            Introduction to Law for Commerce


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: O at C

This course explores the source of law, development of Parliamentary law and Common law, the role of English law in the Pacific, law of contract, law of sale of goods, law of principal and agent. The topics of substantive law studied in this course are not only useful and important in themselves in the commercial/business area but also provide a sound base for further legal studies, as well as demonstrate the various sources of law, legal method and the process of change and development of the law.


AF121            Introduction to Accounting Information Systems


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: O at C

The course exposes and explores the depth of using MYOB accounting software currently adopted in many business environment for recording, analysing and interpreting accounting data in the modern business environments. This course is specially designed for financial accounting data to be analysed and reported to the users such as the management and the stakeholders. In doing so, particular emphasis will be placed on using practical examples, integrating and disseminating accounting modules to suit the needs of the business. This course will provide an initiative for mainstream practical accounting knowledge within the Region.


AF201            Managerial Accounting


Prerequisites: AF102

Semester 1:  F at L and B at C*                                    Semester 2:  O at C

This course utilises the cost accounting data studied in AF102. It includes analysis of the management accounting information for managing and creating value using various approaches. Students will be exposed to applying these approaches and techniques that will facilitate the decision making process.


AF205  Law of Associations                                                              


Prerequisites: AF108

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: O at C

This course introduces the basic principles of partnership law and company law. Brief reference is made to the use of the trust in business contexts. Statutory material for the course is taken from Fiji. Occasional reference for comparative purposes is made to the statute law of other South Pacific island nations. Case law is drawn from a variety of common law jurisdictions.


AF208            Financial Management


Prerequisites: FM101

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course studies the development of a framework for investment and financing decisions both short and long term for private enterprises and government bodies; the factors influencing the allocation of funds to competing alternatives; risk analysis models for financial decision making; the financial system; the theory of capital structure; and, financial strategies for growth.


AF209            Electronic Commerce                                                   


Prerequisites: AF121 or IS121

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course constitutes an introduction to electronic commerce, a term which means the sharing of business information, maintaining business relationships, and conducting business transactions by means of telecommunication networks. The course explains electronic commerce, associated security issues, business strategies and management issues, and examines pertinent technology standards and protocols.


AF210            Financial Accounting                                                   


Prerequisites: AF102

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: B at C

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the regulatory framework that governs financial reporting practice, a sine qua non for any professional in the discipline of accounting. The course considers the justification for the regulation of accounting practice, the need for ongoing critical review of accounting regulations and consequent changes. The course will expose students to the current state of financial reporting practice and offer explanations as to why regulators have seen fit to establish such practices. Students will be encouraged to demonstrate competency in applying financial reporting practices, and to consider how such practices may continue to evolve.


AF300            Research Project in Accounting                               


Prerequisites: AF201 & AF210

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Detailed proposals of a research project will be considered from students of proven ability. The course requires some research skills.


AF301            Accounting Theory & Applications                         


Prerequisites: AF201 & AF210

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course aims to provide an understanding of the construction of theories that explain and frame the frameworks of accounting regulation and practice and predict developments in accounting practice, consistent with society’s needs for financial reporting. Students will be encouraged to evaluate critically a range of accounting theories and to evaluate their impact on accounting practice.


AF302            Information Systems                                                   


Prerequisites: Any 200 level course and AF 121 or IS121

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines information systems incorporating accounting systems; systems analysis including the design, evaluation, and implementation of business systems in general and accounting systems in particular; internal control and control systems; computer-based information systems; and the uses and potential of information systems.


AF304            Auditing                                                                           


Prerequisites: AF210

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course examines the audit function and the role of the auditor; the audit process as related to the audit of resources, commitments, revenue, and expenses; and, the internal audit, the audit report, and the changing status of the audit function.


AF307            Public Sector Accounting                                           


Prerequisites: AF201 or AF 210

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides a description and evaluation of government accounting and financial management and control systems in the public sector, with particular reference to countries in the region.


AF308            Taxation Law                                                                  


Prerequisites: AF205

Semester 1:  Not offered                                                    Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course is concerned almost exclusively with income tax. It considers each of the major issues that must be dealt with by any system of income tax. The Fiji Income Tax Act is examined in detail as an example of a particular income tax.


AF309            Insolvency Law & Practice                                          


Prerequisites: AF205

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces the legal principles and procedures governing the bankruptcy of individuals and the winding up of insolvent corporations, the law governing receivers, alternatives to bankruptcy and liquidation and related matters. Fiji statutory materials are used and case law is primarily from Fiji.


AF313            Accounting for Management Control                    


Prerequisites: AF201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course incorporates theoretical and practical issues in management accounting and control systems. The aim of this course is to go beyond the technical aspects of management accounting and control systems, into wider issues and context within which organisations, accounting and controls are embedded. In this way the choice, design and implementation (practice) of accounting and control systems can be better understood. It complements the technical components and the conventional wisdom on management accounting and control by including wider issues in historical and inter-disciplinary contexts, thereby enhancing analytical skills, self-awareness and critical thinking among course participants.


AF314            Corporate Accounting                                                


Prerequisites: AF210

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the regulatory framework that governs the accounting for companies, to such an extent that on successful completion of the course the student will be able to undertake such accounting practices. The course will introduce students to accounting entries to report company formation; apply and explain appropriate accounting standards generated by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), that relate to corporate reporting; construct financial reports, that comply with regulatory requirements for companies and groups of companies; undertake the financial accounting processes required to report corporate restructures; and undertake the financial accounting processes pertaining to a corporate liquidation.


AF315            Banking Law                                                                    


Prerequisites: AF108

Semester 1:  F at L and B at C*                                    Semester 2: Not offered

This course covers the principal legal instruments, relationships and dealings commonly arising in the day to day business of a banker. Topics are canvassed at a depth appropriate to a person needing to be an accomplished and competent actor within a legal environment, yet not claiming the expertise of a legal professional. Domestic banking topics focus on Fiji law with reference to the law of other South Pacific jurisdictions for comparative purposes where library facilities permit. Throughout the course emphasis is placed upon standard form banking documentation in use locally.


AF401            Forensic Accounting: Field & Practice


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                               Trimester 3: F at L and B at C*

Students will be required to display that they have some knowledge of the principles and methodologies of forensic accounting. These students have to demonstrate that as accountants they are able to collect evidence, reconstruct financial trails and prove how fraud occurred and who was responsible. All these will be done by following forensic principles and established methodologies. The learning of this course will follow a different approach from undergraduate studies and will focus on both the field and practical approaches to forensic accounting. Using forensic accounting theories and methodologies, this course will discuss the tactics to tackle the ever-increasing fraudulent financial activities in the corporate world. This course will also discuss issues and controversies faced by the current accounting and auditing environment. This course will make use of case studies based on the corporate fraud in the practical environment.


AF402            Legal Elements of Fraud                                                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L and B at C*                     Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

The Legal Elements of Fraud is emerging as a significant area in forensic accounting and there is a high demand from the profession for expertise in such areas. This course will be a core unit for the forensic accounting programme. The course exposes, and explores, the various types, methods and approaches to the fundamental issue involved in fraud. In doing so, particular emphasis will be placed on how fraud occurs, how it can be combated, the legal implications, the methods and resorts used and of course the extent of damage it can cause.


AF405            Fraud Accounting & Fraud Investigation in Financial Reports


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course is designed to introduce students to the general principles and processes of Fraud Accounting and Fraud Investigation in Financial Reports. In this course the practice of Fraud Accounting is explained in the context of fraud occurrence, fraud prevention, fraud detection, fraud examination and fraud investigation in the business financial statements.


AF411            Current Developments in Accounting Research – Financial


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the issues involved in the regulation of financial reporting. It investigates the regulatory approaches employed and the rationales for regulation. The regulatory perspective provides a framework for the analysis of specific contemporary issues in financial reporting. Consideration of these issues illustrates the political nature of the regulatory process and provides the basis for an alternative explanation of the objectives of financial reporting and the use of particular accounting methods in financial statements.


AF412            Current Developments in Accounting Research – Managerial


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The primary focus of this course is to study how management accounting information systems should be designed so as to provide adequate information for planning, decision-making, and control of organisational activities with specific reference to the South Pacific economic scene. The accounting information systems will be discussed in conjunction with how people in organisations are likely to use and react to the information. The course will also address current developments in management accounting practice and research.


AF413            Advanced Accounting Theory                                  


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses.

Semester 1: Not offered                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course is structured to examine theoretical aspects of accounting and adequacy of conceptual accounting doctrines in providing relevant, reliable, and objective accounting information. The theoretical issues covered will be of special relevance to the South Pacific Island economies.


AF415            Reading Courses in Accounting                               


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides flexibility to students who wish to have an understanding of the literature in specific topics in accounting and financial management. The special topics available in any semester will depend on staff research and teaching interests. Students` research interests will be accommodated wherever possible.


AF418            Introduction to Research Methodology                


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses

Semester 1: F at L                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The course aims to give students a general understanding of different types of accounting research and the range of research methodologies that are available, and to equip students with practical research skills and knowledge to be applied to their dissertation projects. The course exposes, and explores, the variety of research methodologies and research methods adopted in (financial, management and auditing) accounting research. In doing so, particular emphasis will be placed on comparing and contrasting positivistic and interpretivist approaches, and on the differences between (and/or potential convergence of) mainstream accounting research within the region.


AF420            Financial Statement Analysis                                    


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L and B at C*                     Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

Money is the life blood of any business. How an organisation obtains and uses that money is of critical importance to the long term viability of that organisation. The financial health of the firm is presented in the four basic financial statements, the proper interpretation of which is critical for investors, creditors and internal management. This course is designed to help those involved in financial analysis make informed judgements as to the health of the organisation and provide guidance for improvement. This course is designed to help the student understand and interpret financial statements. The course will include information on how to read and understand financial statements and how to apply this knowledge to determine the health and current status of a business.


AF431            Advanced Management Accounting                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

An examination of planning and control processes in organisations, and the involvement of management and management support personnel with them. The following topics will be considered. `Formal` and `organisational` perspectives on management planning and control. Planning and decision-making in organisations: some alternative perspectives and descriptions. Planning and budgeting: theoretical perspectives and organisational descriptions. Organisation structures and structuration. Control processes in organisations: some alternative perspectives. Participation as a mode of organisational control. Accounting control systems: some alternative perspectives. Designing management accounting systems; prescription or organisational choice. Categorising and evaluating the literatures on management planning and control.


AF432            Information Systems Control & Audit                   


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

Analysis of internal control and auditing procedures in an EDP environment, use and limitations of common procedures, test desks, audit packages, etc., problems associated with differing applications, use of standard packages, mini and micro-computer based systems, distributed data processing, database applications.


AF433            Advanced Studies in Financial Accounting


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                 Trimester 3: Not offered

A critical review of conceptual framework programmes for financial accounting and reporting. Issues with the traditional financial reporting structure. The impact of the fair value model of accounting on issues related to revenue and expense recognition, and the identification and measurement of assets and liabilities. Evaluation and application of the solvency test. Examination of accounting issues and techniques associated with specific industries and complex business structures. Topics may include accounting in the construction, real estate development, finance and extractive industries; group accounts; segment reports; accounting for unincorporated associations; trading trusts; reporting problems arising from off-balance-sheet financing; pension accounting; foreign currency translation. Accounting for heritage assets, accountability beyond the traditional accounting model. Accountability through the directors` and chief executives’ reports. Corporate social responsibility. Social and environmental accounting.


AF434            Business Information Systems                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: F at L and B at C*

Nature and functions of computer-based information systems used to support management of a business; business databases and reporting; practical experience with business applications software.


AF435            Business Research Methods                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course will introduce students to the basics of business research methods. Topics include probability theories and concepts, hypothesis formulation and testing, linear regression, multiple regression techniques, non-parametric methods, variance analysis, queuing theory and linear programming.


AF436            Accounting for Management Control                    


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course aims to develop in students the ability to appreciate critically the principles of the operations of any management control systems (MCSs) they are likely to encounter in their (future) careers, with a view to both operating effectively within them and, where appropriate, helping to improve them. Accounting control systems (e.g. budgets) are a very important part of MCSs, both in profit oriented and for non-profit organisations. Indeed, the chief accounting officer in a large company is often called the “ The Controller”. One aim of the course is therefore, to enable accounting and finance students to recognise how accounting controls should best be designed and operated in order to try to ensure that a particular organisation and its units remain “in control”.


AF437            Issues of Governance & Ethics Accounting


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: F at L and B at C*     Trimester 3: Not offered

The aim of this course is to expose the students to the need to develop and employ an advanced sense of moral reasoning in accounting practice, notwithstanding the regulatory framework that directs practice. To this end, this course will address ethical issues pertaining to the practice of accounting auditing and accountability, such that students will be able to undertake such practices applying reasoning as identified by Kolberg as being consistent with post-conventional moral development.


AF438            Current Developments in Accounting Research: Auditing


Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or better in Accounting major courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

An examination of current areas of research in auditing and substantive studies in each area. The following topics will be considered: theory about auditing; overview of audit research; research areas; nature of audit work; agency theory and the existence of the audit function; human information processing in auditing; audit teams and the review process; statistical auditing; effects of the audit report; job satisfaction and performance in audit firms; performance criteria and evaluation. Future development in audit theory and research.


AF439            Advanced Taxation Contemporary Issues


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not Offered           Trimester 2: F at L and B at C*              Trimester 3: Not offered

The structure of the tax base: income, capital, consumption. Assessment of the existing base and alternatives. Desirable characteristics of a tax system: equity, neutrality, simplicity, acceptability, administrative efficiency, fiscal flexibility, ability to meet revenue needs. Specific forms of taxation. Official inquiries into taxation. Economic and social issues concerning taxation: taxation and social welfare. Tax reform: needs, problems, approaches. Tax other than income tax: capital taxes, sales tax, land tax, payroll tax, stamp duty. Selected issues.


AF440            Structure of International Taxation                        


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered           Trimester 2: Not offered                       Trimester 3: Not offered

This course aims to assist you to formulate an appreciation of international tax structures, double tax agreements, and tax avoidance and evasions schemes. The course will use case studies based on actual schemes that have eventuated, rather than being based purely on theory. Some case studies that will be used during the semester will be constructed based on current and potential new developments in this area. The course will draw on various materials, which address current issues and controversies surrounding the subject.

 


AF600F          Accounting & Financial Management SRP (Full-Time)               


AF600P         Accounting & Financial Management SRP (Part-Time)              


AF700F          Accounting & Financial Management Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)


AF700P         Accounting & Financial Management Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)


AF750F          Accounting & Financial Management DRP (Full-Time) 


AF750P         Accounting & Financial Management DRP (Part-Time) 


AF800F          Accounting & Financial Management PhD Thesis (Full-Time)


AF800P         Accounting & Financial Management PhD Thesis (Part-Time)


 

EC100            Introduction to Economics

Prerequisites: Year 13/Form 7 or Foundation level Mathematics

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not Offered

This course may not be credited towards a major, minor or Diploma in Economics, nor may it be credited together with a pass in EC101 or EC102. The course provides a self-contained, one-semester introduction to economics and is designed specifically for students who wish to familiarise themselves with the basics of economics, but who do not intend to study it to a higher level. This course begins with a discussion of the nature and scope of economics and then proceeds to examine in detail key aspects of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. Applications of economic theory are discussed in relation to current economic issues in the Pacific Island economies and in the world economy as a whole.


EC101            Principles of Macroeconomics                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L

Macroeconomics deals with the behaviour of the whole economy. This course is designed primarily to familiarise students with the basic theory of income determination – what determines the level of national income and output in modern economies.


EC102            Principles of Microeconomics                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: B at C

This course introduces students to microeconomics, the other branch of economics, which examines the behaviour of individuals, households, firms, and specific firms. The main emphasis in this introductory course is on the development of a sound understanding of theories of consumption and production. The course also provides the insight that individual decision makers, acting rationally and independently to maximise individual welfare, contribute to the overall welfare of all the market participants.


EC201            Intermediate Macroeconomics                                


Prerequisites: EC101

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: O at C

This course has three major objectives. The first is a deepening of the understanding of how an economy works as a system, with complex interactions among variables and economic factors. The second is the explanation of how exogenous factors, especially government policies, can affect the system, together with the fostering of a capacity to evaluate real-world policies, including those pursued by governments in the South Pacific region. The third objective is the delineation of competing macroeconomic theories and the ways in which they have evolved; attention centres on the expanded Keynesian system, Monetarism and the Classical system.


EC202            Intermediate Microeconomics                                 


Prerequisites: EC102

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: F at L

This is an intermediate level neoclassical microeconomics course which presents theories that try to explain how South Pacific societies “allocate scarce resources amongst competing ends”. The course covers the usual theories of consumer behaviour, firms’ production and costs, market structures, theories of income distribution, general equilibrium and welfare economics. Given the small size of Pacific economies, there will be greater emphasis on monopoly and oligopoly theory. There will be an introduction to applications of microeconomics to international economics, public finance, environment, welfare economics and gender economics.


EC203            Economic Statistics                                                      


Prerequisites: EC101 or EC102 or ST131

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: B at C

This course gives you the basic theoretical and practical hands-on experience on statistical methods in economics. Students are taught how to do basic statistical calculations and analysis using Microsoft Excel. The course starts with an introduction of basic concepts in statistics, including techniques for presenting data, describing statistics, probability theory, and discrete and continuous distributions. By the middle of the semester issues such as sampling distributions and estimation methods are introduced and finally hypothesis tests and the theory of ordinary least squares and time series analysis are introduced.


EC301            Macroeconomics Analysis                                         


Prerequisites: EC201 and EC203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course builds on macroeconomic and microeconomic courses offered by the School of Economics at 100- and 200-levels. It uses theoretical analysis to develop policy prescriptions in a highly controversial field which is of great practical significance to present-day policy-makers.


EC302            Microeconomics Analysis                                          


Prerequisites: EC202 and EC203

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not Offered

The course builds a sound micro-foundation to understand key issues in economic analysis. The subject provides a theoretical framework to understand welfare economics, uncertainty and risk, economics of strategy, economics of regulation, asymmetric information, cost-benefit analysis, provision of public goods, income re-distribution and government spending and taxation. Both graphical and calculus based derivations are used to construct examples to analyse complicated economic problems.


EC303            Econometrics                                                                 


Prerequisites: EC203 or OS203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course is an introductory one that teaches students the fundamental concepts and methods of estimation in Econometrics. It also introduces basic applied econometrics. The theory covered in this course includes Ordinary Least Squares estimation procedure and hypothesis tests on parametric estimates. The students are taught how to interpret the estimated parameters and use such estimates to predict or forecast economic or social events. The Excel software is extensively used for data management and Views for econometric estimations.


EC304            Development Economics                                           


Prerequisites: EC201 and EC203

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course gives students a systematic introduction to the characteristics and problems of developing countries. It also: surveys the main theories and models of growth and development; and examines a range of policy-related issues bearing on industrial and agricultural development, international trade, transport, technology, gender, the environment, structural `adjustment`, foreign aid, foreign investment, and demography. In all cases, the general significance of these issues is established first, and then possible relevance to the circumstances of the Pacific Islands is identified and discussed. In addition, certain topics of particular importance in the islands are examined in especial detail, notably environmental problems, population growth and migration, trade and aid issues in an era of deregulation, and the consequences of `smallness` for development in general and policy formulation in particular.


EC306            International Economics                                            


Prerequisites: EC202 and EC203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course provides the theoretical base required to understand the key issues in the field of international economics. Key topics include: the theory of international trade, trade policy, Pacific Island countries’ trading structures and the role of the World Trade Organisation in facilitating international trade.


EC307            Resource & Environmental Economics                  


Prerequisites: EC101 or EC102 or any 100 level GE/GS course

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides detailed coverage of theoretical and applied issues in the interlocking fields of natural resource economics and environmental economics, both in general terms and with special reference to the South Pacific. While aimed primarily at students majoring in economics, the course is designed to be of interest to all students with a basic (100-level) grounding in microeconomics.


EC308            Economics of Tourism                                                 


Prerequisites: EC100 or EC102

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to appeal primarily to students majoring in economics and/or tourism management. It introduces students to the economic logic underlying the development, structure and performance of the tourism industry and analyses the impact of tourism on a wide range of economic and other variables, particularly in the Pacific Island context.


EC311            Labour Economics                                                        


Prerequisites: EC102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

This course provides a sound understanding of the labour market and equips students with the basic tools necessary to analyse contemporary labour market issues such as the functioning of labour markets, affirmative action policies, labour mobility, information and job search, unemployment, minimum wages and wage/income inequality.


EC401            Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis                       


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course addresses issues such as inflation, unemployment, economic growth, consumption, central banking and exchange rates using an open economy macroeconomic framework. It is assumed that students will have background knowledge in the areas of AD-AS model and IS-LM analysis.


EC402            Advanced Microeconomic Analysis                        


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines current issues in microeconomics including the mathematics of optimisation, consumer theory, choice under uncertainty, production theory, the behaviour of firms in different market situations and the limits of markets as an allocation mechanism.


EC403            Applied Econometrics                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims at deepening the understanding of modern econometric analysis. The course will cover a variety of topics ranging from econometric theory to econometric applications. The theoretical aspects will cover maximum likelihood method, generalised methods of moments, maximum simulated likelihood method and their asymptotic justifications. In terms of applications, time series, cross-sectional and panel data will be used within the theoretical framework with emphasis on theoretical interpretation.


 EC404           Economic Growth & Development                         


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course examines the theories of economic development in recent times. It will cover specific economic development related issues such as foreign aid, trade, human resource, privatisation, technological advancement, investment and human welfare.


EC405            Agricultural Economics                                               


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics (The course is for Masters Programme)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course will use theory and techniques learnt in EC402 and apply it to Food Economics and Marketing, and Agricultural Industries. Students will acquire skills that would enable them to work as a professional agricultural economist in an industry or government, or to proceed to a career in agricultural economics research. Students will use a combination of parametric and non-parametric statistics to solve farm management problems. Estimation of frontier production/cost function(s), data envelopment analysis and linear programming will be covered.


EC406            International Economics & Trade                            


Prerequisites:  Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course examines the microeconomic theory and policy issues of international trade. It will examine the gains from trade, the determinants of patterns of international trade and the effects of trade on income distribution. It will then turn to policy and analyse a number of arguments for effective trade and industrial policies. It will also look at preferential trading areas using Pacific Island and Asia Pacific economy case studies.


EC407            Policy Analysis                                                               


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This is an introduction to a range of economic policy issues and applications that are current for most Pacific Island Countries (PICs). The topics include: population projections and policy implications for education financing and labour market analysis, quantitative poverty analysis and poverty alleviation policies, cost benefit analysis and applications, issues in privatisation, monopoly regulation, and trade integration. These topics may be added to, as and when resource persons become available. The course is a “hands-on” approach that takes students through practical data analysis, the derivation of sound statistical results, and the formulation of policy advice given through clear easy to read reports.


EC408            International Finance & Development                  


Prerequisites:  Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course will focus on international finance with an emphasis on developing countries. The course will be both, theoretical and applied in nature. It will address several core issues pertaining to international finance in developing countries. Some of the core areas of focus are: international finance in a global context, finance and development in Pacific Island countries, the financial sector in developing countries, the link between the financial sector and economic growth, market failures and governance in the financial sector, long-term financing and debt, foreign direct investment, capital outflows, micro-finance and money laundering.


EC410            Monetary Economics                                                  


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course will discuss theoretical issues relating to exchange rate behaviour and management; current account; capital mobility; purchasing power and international prices; role of international institutions (IMF and The World Bank) and the global economy; fiscal and monetary policy effectiveness in open economies.


EC412            Economics of Governance & Institutions


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

A course in economics of governance and institutions accomplishes a series of courses that constitute the basic training for economists. In this course students study the impact of institutions on the incentives of economic agents and as a result on the wealth of the society. Institutional structure of the economy determines the incentives of the participants of economic activity, the range of their possibilities and the transaction costs they bear. Institutions have proven important for economic and social development. Much discussion nevertheless revolves around which types of institutions matter, and to what extent these institutions change over time. This course introduces the main categories that describe the institutional structure of the society and help to understand that institutions matter both in theory and in practice.


EC414            Special Topic                                                                  


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This is a Special topic, which shall be offered if resources are available. The title of this course will be Special Topic and not tagged for any particular subject. Any subject of interest can be offered under this title. Special topics are offered from time to time. Thus course serves the purpose.


EC415            Environmental & Resource Economics                  


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course in environmental and resource economics will address selected issues such as market failures; common property issues; institutions; global environment and natural resources; economic tools of environmental assessment; public policy issues relating to environment and natural resource conservation.


EC416            World Trade Organisation & Trade Liberalisation in Development


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Diploma in Diplomacy and International Affairs

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is specific to WTO and trade liberalisation. It covers trade related issues for developing and more specifically for small and vulnerable economies. The course provides deeper insights into international trade affairs and draws heavily from the WTO and related libraries to explain the role and patterns of world trade within the context of WTO rules and agreements. In addition, it provides an assessment of regional and bilateral trade agreements and development implications with specific references to Pacific Island states.


EC417            Growth Theory & Empirics                                         


Prerequisites: Postgraduate Diploma in Economics

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is specific to the theory and empirics of economic growth. It is built on the analysis of theoretical growth models, especially after the classic works of Solow (1956), Romer (1986) and Barro and Sala-i-Martin (1992). It also addresses the recent developments in the theory and empirics of growth. Students are exposed to practical computer lab sessions to apply the latest econometric methods with country specific time series and cross-country panel data sets to explain (i) the sources of growth, (ii) the effects of plausible determinants of growth; and (iii) simulate growth models for policy. The course is expected to be innovative as new ideas, econometric software and theoretical insights become apparent.

 


EC600F          Economics SRP (Full-Time)


EC600P          Economics SRP (Part-Time)


EC700F          Economics Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)


EC700P          Economics Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)


EC750F          Economics DRP (Full-Time)


EC750P          Economics DRP (Part-Time)


EC800F          Economics PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                     


EC800P          Economics PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                            


 

FM101           Financial Mathematics                                                 

Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: B at C

This course will introduce students to the application of mathematics to financial calculations. Skills acquired in this course are relevant to the comprehension of sophisticated financial modelling in advanced courses. Topics include simple and compound interest, time value of money, continuous compounding, fixed and growing annuities, probabilities in a financial context, regression and multivariate analysis, and portfolio optimisation. The course will assume familiarity with the mathematics covered in MA101. Topics will be chosen only for their relevance to future needs in a course on finance, and all will be illustrated with practical financial examples.


FM102           Personal Financial Planning                                      


Prerequisites: AF101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course fills a two-fold need in a finance major programme. Firstly it introduces students to basic financial concepts and decisions and the fundamental elements of financial planning. These concepts will be revisited in following courses in a variety of more conventional contexts, for example, corporate and small business financial management. Secondly such a course introduces students to a rapidly growing area of financial management seen as playing an important role in developing, increasingly affluent and also ageing societies. Fulfilling the latter need is of particular importance in Pacific societies where knowledge of appropriate personal financial management is crucial to improving living standards.


FM201           Financial Institutions & Markets                             


Prerequisites: FM101

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to introduce the mechanics of financial markets and institutions. Its focus, whilst primarily descriptive, provides a basis for determining an appropriate financial markets structure for the individual countries of the region and for the region as an economic bloc. The emphasis is on describing the structure of financial markets in general, how those markets function, how they relate to various economic and political structures and how they facilitate the effective and efficient transfer of financial resources.


FM202           Small Business Finance                                               


Prerequisites: FM101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course concerns the financial management of small business enterprises. The course is designed to achieve dual but related aims. First, it is designed to apply theories concepts and models studied in earlier finance courses to the unique environment of small business management. Second, it focuses on the application of small business finance management models and techniques to small business management as it operates in the South Pacific region where this business form is prevalent. The course also explores current and relevant past research done in the area of small business finance.


FM301           Portfolio Analysis & Investment                             


Prerequisites: FM201 or FM202 or AF208

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course focuses on the essential considerations required in the process of the formation, analysis and management of investment portfolios. Portfolio theory, markets efficiency and asset pricing models such as CAPM and single-index models introduced in previous courses are critically evaluated in full. Techniques and practices used in security selection for institutional investment portfolios and coverage of derivative securities as it is pertinent to investment choice and portfolio formation is provided.


FM302           Financial Management in the Pacific Region


Prerequisites: FM201 or FM202 or AF208

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

The focus of this course is to explore the challenges and problems of adapting some of the techniques, models and practices studied in earlier courses to the local region. Students will study how effective financial markets structures and management practices currently absent from the region might be introduced and employed and the problems of doing so. This course will utilise input from local and regional industry practitioners.


FM303           International Finance                                                  


Prerequisites: FM201 or FM202 or AF208

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on aspects of investing and financing across borders in an increasingly global business environment. It explores the process and risks of investing across borders and financing internationally. Aspects such as foreign exchange, taxation and regulatory issues will be investigated. International diversification as a business strategy will be evaluated. The impact of increasing globalisation will be explored. A particular emphasis will be on managing the various risks associated with operating in an international business environment.


FM305           Financial Risk Management                                      


Prerequisites: FM201 or FM202 or AF208

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course extends the material covered in earlier courses such as FM202. It focuses on providing a thorough understanding of derivatives markets and techniques for managing asset risk. The nature and role of derivative securities in this process is explored. Topics covered include the use of derivative securities, forward and futures contracts on stock indices, investments and consumptive assets, options on stocks, stock indices and futures, swaps, hedging positions/strategies, binomial option pricing, numerical techniques in option pricing, exotic options and options on non-traded assets.


FM401           Corporate Finance                                                        


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered              Trimester 3: Not offered

Using corporate finance theories and models, this course will discuss current topics, issues and also controversies faced by the capital market participants in their day-to-day operations. The course will make use of case studies based on the actual corporate events, for example, changing corporate structures and processes, relevancy or irrelevancy of financial models, mergers and acquisitions, corporate failures and the impact of financial crisis. Some cases may be constructed during the semester as new developments unfold. Student participation in the teaching and learning process will be encouraged.


F600F       Finance SRP (Full-Time)            


F600P       Finance SRP (Part-Time)           


F700F       Finance Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)


F700P       Finance Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)


F750F       Finance DRP (Full-Time)  


F750P       Finance DRP (Part-Time) 


F800F       Finance PhD Thesis (Full-Time)


F800P       Finance PhD Thesis (Part-Time)


 


OS101           Official Statistics & National Statistical Systems 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course introduces students to an ordered characterisation of official statistics as a subject or branch of knowledge. It introduces the articulately constructed theoretical underpinning of official statistics. Based on the `approach perspective`, this theory of official statistics is constituted of a set of articulated premises that is capable of vigorously driving a process of searching for new and reliable knowledge through measurement and reasoning. The course also discusses the nature of the system (national statistical system) that houses appropriate processes, stakeholders, and institutional arrangements implied by the presented theory of Official Statistics. Towards the end it focuses on a powerful revelation of the said theory of official statistics.


OS102           Introduction to Statistical Frameworks                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

OS102 is an introductory course to statistical frameworks. Students will be introduced to key statistical integration tools and to the International Standards and their role in Official Statistics with specific focus on some of the important standards. Topics include an overview of the tools, statistical integration to support cohesion across statistical outputs, international standards and their role in Official Statistics, classification systems, frameworks for supporting data collection, geography as an integrating tool, techniques for maintaining consistency over time, the key statistical frameworks relevant to the Pacific.


OS201           Official Statistics & National Statistics Systems 2


Prerequisites: OS101

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course covers data generation processes. Topics include statistical cycle, sampling techniques and data collection procedures, data processing, quality control systems and other data mining processes including dissemination of official statistics.


OS202           National Accounts 1                                                     


Prerequisites: OS102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course builds on OS102 and focuses on the principles, conventions and methodology  of the SNA2008 and national accounts. The course introduces national accounting, GDP calculation, price statistics, government finance, trade and agriculture statistics and their data accounting frameworks.


OS203           Statistical Methods for Official Statistics                    


Prerequisites: ST131

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

The course will cover the statistical methods most commonly used in official statistics. These include the (1) design of statistical frameworks, (2) survey design, (3) sample design, (4) methods for managing non-sampling errors, (5) quality management, (6) index numbers, (7) time series and (8) analysis and presentation of official statistics. Some degree of mathematical statistics knowledge will be important for this course. These skills are sought after by Pacific Islands governments, especially the national statistical offices.


OS301           Introduction to Census Survey Data Analysis


Prerequisites: OS203

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with specialist skills and practical knowledge that are central to survey and census data analysis. The skills such as data imports, management for computer analysis, data entry, transformation, analysis, graphical presentation of data and report writing, will be taught in this course. The course provides an overview of data sets and subsets, management of large data sets, and most importantly of data entry, and analysis using the social science data analysis software such as SPSS (the Statistical Package for Social Sciences) and CSPro (Census Survey Data Processing System). Emphasis will be placed on data entry, editing, transformation and management. It will emphasise statistical data analysis: summarise frequencies, cross tabulations, tabulation of data, test of associations, Chi sq tests. Advanced statistical analysis will include correlation and regressions.


OS302           National Accounts 2


Prerequisites: OS201

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides practical application to constructing National Accounts and details their frameworks. It also discusses tourism, environment and informal sector statistics that seriously impinge on the National Accounts of the Pacific region.


OS303           ICT & Information Management for Official Statistics


Prerequisites: OS201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course will start by providing some understanding of what are the attributes of a good IT environment for an official statistical office. This will include some analysis of how you govern and manage it to ensure this is the case. The course will then move on to consider the statistical functions and understand the IT and Information Management methods used in collecting, processing and disseminating census and survey data. The Generic Statistical Business Process Model (GSBPM) should provide the underlying framework for this part of the course. Applications of IT cannot stand still. There will be opportunities to use new technologies to change the way of doing things to improve outputs, their qualities or productivity. The course will cover some of the key tools to support this such as Business Process Analysis and IT Project Management. The course will finish with some discussion of recent developments in IT and Information Management that are relevant to official statistics. The main learning outcomes will be a better understanding of the principles, practices and techniques of IT and Information Management including what is involved in the management and governance of the IT environment.


PD101           Introduction to Population Studies                        


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

The course provides an introduction to the field of population studies and demography. It begins by examining the population dynamics. Then it focuses on the causes of population growth through the analysis of fertility, mortality, migration and the demographic transition. Later it shifts to the consequences of population growth and examines the Malthusian and anti-Malthusian perspectives. The relationship between population growth or lack thereof and issues of youthful populations, population ageing, economic development, food supply and the environment are also assessed. Other related topics that will be discussed include morbidity and the epidemiological transition, urbanisation and international migration.


PD200           Introduction to Analytical Demography               


Prerequisites: PD101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This introductory course in the more quantitative aspects of demography will be concerned with the elementary concepts, methods and techniques of analytical demography. This course involves direct measurement of demographic indices from data collected in censuses, vital statistics and surveys. It is assumed that basic data used in the measurement are of sufficient quality and that it is possible to derive reasonable demographic indices from these data sources.


PD301           Pacific Population & Urban Issues                          


Prerequisites: PD200

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course will be concerned with the relationships between population and development, and their integration in development planning. In the first part of the course, relationships between population and development will be viewed from a historical point of view. Different models or theoretical approaches to population and development relationships will be considered. The second part of the course will explore current themes on population growth and development interactions. Major emphasis will be given to understanding population growth and its implications for economic growth, social development, migration and development, reproductive health and environment. Gender issues will be addressed in relation to current themes in population and development. The integration of population variables in development planning and policy making and programmes in the Pacific will be discussed. Throughout the course the emphasis will be placed on population and development issues in the South Pacific.


PD303           Applied Demography                                                  


Prerequisites: PD200

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

The population processes of fertility, mortality and migration and their implications for decision-making and planning will be examined in this course. Demographic, social and economic data are crucial to strategic decision-making for public policies, businesses, industries and public enterprises. Future planning in business, employment and all other aspects of socio-economic development depend on the forecasts and projections of demographic data and their trends and patterns of change. The course will examine demographic and social data and statistics, local area demographic and business profiles, sources of demographic and socio-economic data, their usefulness and quality, data for planning needs by local authorities and the state. Further, it will use techniques of population projections and projection software to project population and labour force. Local and regional databases will be accessed in order to give students indications of the type and use of socio-demographic, economic and business data.


PD401           Demographic Data Collection & Analysis Techniques


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the problems connected with the collection, processing, and adjustment of population and population related data in general and in the South Pacific region in particular. During the second part of the course a number of demographic techniques and models will be discussed necessary for an understanding of the topics taught in PD402.


PD402           Advanced Demographic Methods for Statistically Undercounted  Population


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

In countries where basic demographic information is incomplete and/or defective, as in most countries in the South Pacific region, demographic parameters must be estimated using indirect analysis techniques. During the estimation procedure extensive use must be made of models, computer processing and demographic computer packages. It is imperative that students from countries in the South Pacific region doing an MA in Population Studies and Demography have a detailed understanding of these estimation procedures. During this course they will be asked to apply these procedures using data from their own country and other countries in the South Pacific region.

PD700F         Population Studies & Demography Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)

PD700P         Population Studies & Demography Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)

PD750F         Population Studies & Demography DRP (Full-Time)

PD750P         Population Studies & Demography DRP (Part-Time)

PD800F         Population Studies & Demography PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

PD800P         Population Studies & Demography PhD Thesis (Part-Time)