School of Agriculture, Geography, Environment, Oceans, and Natural Sciences (SAGEONS)

Course Descriptions

Note: UU100 and UU114 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 200-level courses. UU200 and UU204 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 300-level courses. Only approved programmes may be exempt from this requirement.

 


AG111           Introduction to Agricultural Economics


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is an introduction to basic economic ideas within an agricultural context. Topics include agricultural production resources, marginal analysis, input combinations, product interrelationship, cost concepts, economics of scales, and type of agricultural markets.


AG124           Fundamentals of Soil Science


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM and B at C                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic knowledge of soil formation, the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil, soil fertility and fertilizers, soil survey and classification, soil erosion and soil management in relation to crop production.


AG134           Agricultural Mechanisation


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and B at C

The course will give the student a basic understanding of the internal combustion engine and its maintenance. It exposes students to a range of machines and equipment available for use in agriculture and to provide some hands-on training in their operations and maintenance with special emphasis on tractors and some cultivation implements.


AG164           Introductory Agricultural Biology


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to basic plant biology relevant to crop production. Topics include basic concepts of botany, anatomy, morphology, physiology, taxonomy, ecology, cell biology, genetics and plant breeding, and tropical environment and effects of climatic factors on crop growth and development in the South Pacific.


AG165           Field & Plantation Crops Production


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course will provide detailed studies of production aspects of the most important field, plantation, and horticulture crops in the South Pacific region. Each crop will be assessed for its place, economic significance and potential in the region and possible improvements in production and quality. Coverage will include production environment, husbandry practices, harvesting, utilisation and post-harvest handling.


AG172           Introduction to Animal Science


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course provides students with basic knowledge of the domestication and contribution of farm animals to man, their adaptation (anatomy and physiology) and routine management practices (housing, nutrition, feeds and feeding, reproduction and health). The course will emphasise the application of of these concepts to real farm situations for optimum outputs


AG211           Agricultural Development                                         


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

The course examines the major problems of agricultural development confronting tropical countries today especially the in South Pacific. Adopting an essential interdisciplinary approach the course examines the wider issues involved in managing natural, human and technological resources in agricultural development planning; the effects of social and political institutions; markets and infrastructure; and problems of aid and trade and to examine critically remedial agricultural policies to foster more rapid development in the region.


AG212           Farm Management Principles                                   


Prerequisites: AG111

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course’s subject matter integrates the basic agricultural economics with the technical husbandry skills of crops, livestock, soils, plant protection and farm machinery and put them into a management and planning framework. The analyses and illustrations are based on the actual experiences and data from the farmers in the South Pacific region.


AG213           Statistics for Agriculture                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course introduces students to a basic and practical understanding of statistical methods as applied to  agricultural data analysis and enable them to collect, organise and analyse data, and to state meaningful hypotheses statements and conclusions from research results. Students also learn simple experimental designs and analyse the relationship between two variables.


AG221           Soil Fertility & Plant Nutrition                                  


Prerequisites: AG124

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and B at C

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of soil fertility parameters governing crop growth, especially in the South Pacific and to carry out appropriate practices to improve and maintain the productivity of agricultural land.


AG266           Horticultural Crops Production                                


Prerequisites: AG164

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

The course is designed to provide students with training in the selection and preparation of land for crop production, learning the theory and practice of propagation of crops using both seed and vegetative methods, knowledge and skills in nursery making and management, principles and skills in cropping  systems of vegetables, seeding rate calculations and making planning calendars, knowledge and skills in production of important horticultural food and high value ornamental crops of the South Pacific region.


AG268           Pathogens & Pests of Crops                                      


Prerequisites: AG164

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to introduce students to the various agents that causediseases and damage in crop plants and/or their produce. Emphasis will be placed on identification of the various organisms; understanding their biology and ecology, and the nature of damage they cause. The course provides students with the background needed to study crop protection.


AG273           Monogastric Livestock Production                         


Prerequisites: AG172

Semester 1: F at SAM and B at C                                 Semester 2: Not offered

The course covers theory and practice of scientific techniques of pig and poultry production. The topics covered include status of pig and poultry industry in the South Pacific region, pig and poultry breeds, their housing, nutrition, feeds and feeding systems, health and routine care of stock, products quality and quantity, and record keeping.


AG311           Agricultural Project Management                           


Prerequisites: AG212

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with an intensive knowledge of the principles and practices of agricultural project appraising, planning, implementing, financing, monitoring and evaluating with emphasis on the tools of managerial analysis and decision making. The challenges, opportunities and constraints faced in managing agricultural development projects in the agro-economic environment of South Pacific island countries will also be discussed.


AG312           Agricultural Marketing & Supply Chains


Prerequisites: AG212

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

The course provides analytical techniques to evaluate different agricultural marketing problems and programs, with special reference to Pacific Island countries. The topics include study of market structure, behavior, performance, price spread, and supply chains, of agricultural products. Food marketing regulations, protection and promotion of consumer health and safety, and food quality standards assurance such as ISO 9000 series and HACCP implementation are also discussed.


AG314           Agribusiness Finance & Risk Management                                                          


Prerequisites: AG212

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an understanding of tools, techniques and other skills necessary to analyze financial decision making as applied to small and large agribusiness enterprises. Selected topics include: financial math; understanding and evaluating financial statements; valuation of financial assets; agribusiness investment appraisal, lease versus purchase decisions involving land, machinery and crops; working capital management. Course also covers frameworks and techniques for categorizing, analyzing and planning for risk management for agribusinesses firms and supply chains.


AG351           Agricultural Extension & Programmes Planning


Prerequisites: One 200 Level AG course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills used in planning and developing agricultural extension communications and the effects of socio-cultural factors on choosing suitable extension teaching methods for farmers. The major practical component of the course requires students to plan and undertake an agricultural extension program relating to an assigned rural community.


AG363           Pest & Disease Management                                    


Prerequisites: AG268

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and B at C

This is a multi-discipline course integrating plant husbandry and pest and disease management. The course covers different management strategies and tactics with emphasis to biological andcultural means and introducing the concept of compatibility of different tactics to be used in integrated crop pest and disease management approach. Such an approach will assist students to apply the more theoretical content from previous courses to practical situations.


AG364           Sustainable Agricultural Production


Prerequisites: AG165 & AG266

Semester 1: F at SAM and O at C                                Semester 2: Not offered

The course provides an understanding of the environmental and climate change interface with agricultural production systems and the techniques and policies for efficient management of agricultural resources (soil, water, plants, animals, etc.) in different farming systems of the South Pacific region for sustainable production of food, feed, fibre, firewood, etc. Topics include tropical farming systems, agroforestry, cropping patterns, sequential cropping, mixed cropping, timing of crop production, seed technology and tissue culture in relation to crop production, hydroponics, organic crop production, sustainable livestock production systems, and phytosanitary requirements of export of food products.


AG366           Crop Physiology & Breeding


Prerequisites: AG266

Semester 1: F at SAM and B at C                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the fundamentals of tropical crop physiology and breeding relevant to the region. Crop physiology: control of development; leaf canopy and root system; dry matter production by interception and conversion of solar radiation; transpiration control and dry matter production; pattern of assimilates; environmental and physiological control of yield; crop breeding; revision of basic genetics; basic features of plant breeding; objectives of plant breeding; plant breeding schemes; supplementary techniques including tissue culture and genetic engineering; disease resistance; genetic resource conservation.


AG372           Animal Genetics & Breeding


Prerequisites: AG172

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides students an opportunity to understand the common theories and concepts of animal breeding and genetics in livestock production.  Subject areas to be covered will include aspects of gene actions, population genetics, nature and cause of variation, selection, genetic progress, breeding systems, embryo transfer, modem breeding technology, breeding programmes for different species of farm animals.


AG373           Ruminant Livestock Production                               


Prerequisites: AG273

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course provides students with in-depth theoretical and technical knowledge of ruminant (Beef and dairy cattle, goat, and sheep) farming systems. Topics covered include importance of ruminants and ruminant products in the South Pacific region, ruminant livestock breeds, ruminant livestock diseases and parasites, tropical pasture as a feed for ruminants, tropical pasture species, nutritional values, pasture establishment and management, fodder crops and concentrate supplements.


AG383           Research Project Management Skills                     


Prerequisites: AG213

Semester 1: F at SAM & L This is a field survey course, needs staff supervision                         Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with understanding of theoretical and applied aspects of agricultural research methods so that they are able to choose appropriate research methods and analytical tools for managing research projects for specific types of research problems. Students are required (individually or in a team) to conduct research experiments/field surveys on specific topics of their choice in any particular sub-discipline of agriculture, and then analyse the data, interpret results, draw conclusions and communicate them in project reports and seminars.


AG401           Advanced Design & Analysis of Experiment


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM                                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide advanced skills in experimental design; sampling theory and practice; estimation of population parameters; analysis using non-parametric procedures;; design, analysis, interpretation and display of factorial experiments; covariance analysis; linear models; advanced analysis of variance and treatment contrasts; response curves and surfaces and the use of computer packages for statistical analysis.


AG411           Agricultural Production & Managerial Economics


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM                                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides students with applied economic techniques for analysing farm production systems. Topics include critical analysis of principles of production economics and decision theory, estimation and interpretation of agricultural production and cost functions, evaluation of farm resource use allocation and efficiency, and agricultural production analysis under uncertainty.


AG412           Advanced Agricultural Marketing                           


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM

This course covers advanced  concepts and principles of agricultural marketing and supply chain management. Its focus is on how agripreneurs can manage all aspects of supply chain activity to create a sustainable, competitive and cooperative arrangement for optimizing the transportation, processing or storage cost and the coordination of supply chain and  food quality and safety systems including HACCP.


AG415           Agricultural & Rural Development Policy                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM

This course will critically analyse the issues, objectives, conceptual theoretical foundations, and instruments of various policies and practices aimed at agricultural and rural development. The focus of discussion will be on policies related to marketing of farm products and inputs, rural financial markets, cooperatives, land reform, agricultural research and extension, climate change, and a range of issues from the perspectives of developing countries and the Pacific Island Nations.


AG422           Advanced Soil Fertility & Plant Nutrition                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM

This course is intended to provide details on plant nutrients their role, deficiency and toxicity symptoms and particularly the factors that govern the plant nutrients availability. It will also provide insight on soil organic matter, its decomposition and role in maintaining soil fertility. It will critically analyse soil fertility evaluation methods to select an appropriate one for formulating fertiliser recommendation. It will also provide details on principles, methods and rate of fertiliser application for different crops and handle and storage of fertilisers.


AG461           Advanced Crop Physiology                                        


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM

This course is intended to provide details, principles, and techniques of measurement of the physiological processes in crops. In particular, the relationship of crop yield to radiation, light interception, efficiency of photosynthesis and partitioning of dry matter will be examined.


AG464           Advanced Pest Management                                    


Prerequisites: AG363

Semester 1: F at SAM                                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course  introduces advanced tactics in pest and disease management including various sampling and monitoring techniques for analyzing insect pest population and disease incidence for management decision-making. The principles and applications of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) will be emphasized. IPM constitutes a series of pest control tactics and strategies toward more sustainable agriculture, natural resources, and urban and rural health and well-being.


AG465           Mixed Cropping                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM                                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the yield advantages of mixed cropping compared with mono-cropping,  especially inflow-input  input cropping systems under various environmental and management conditions. It also investigates the factors affecting the competitive ability of different species in mixtures and imparts an understanding of the underlying ecological processes affecting both the yield advantage of mixtures and the competitive ability of the component species, giving special attention to the relative magnitude of above ground and below ground interactions. The various experimental designs useful in the study of mixed cropping (plant competition) will also be examined.


AG471           Advanced Poultry & Pig Production


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at SAM and O at C

This course is designed to equip students with understanding of the importance of the poultry and pig industries in the Pacific economy and modern trends in poultry and swine production. The course will equip them with practical knowledge of the production systems, the breeds and breeding programmes of poultry and pigs, their housing, feeding, common diseases and management, processing and marketing of pigs and poultry with emphasise on the South Pacific region. The course will also prepare students in the management of secondary species of poultry (turkeys, ducks etc.) and the integration of poultry and pigs with other farming systems in the region.


AG472           Advanced Ruminant Livestock Production                  


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2:  F at L and O at C*

This course is intended to prepare and equip students with recent trends in ruminant livestock production. This will enable them to better understand the pressing needs of ruminant livestock in terms of housing breeding, nutrition, behavior, welfare, waste management and disease prevention. The implementation of these practices in the Pacific Island Countries will be one of the main focuses of this course.


AG473           Advanced Animal Products & By-products Processing


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at SAM                                                     Semester 2:  Not Offered

The course discusses production and supply of safe processed livestock products for human consumption and environment-friendly and economically sound technologies of managing waste emanating from the livestock production chain is the emphasis of the course. Value addition to livestock products and by-products will also be discussed.


AG474           Advanced Animal Breeding


Prerequisites: Admission to Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with understanding of the recent trend in animal breeding. Students will be able to address the lack of interest and knowledge in animal breeding in the Pacific Island Countries and develop practical and sustainable breeding programmes.

AG600F         Agriculture SRP (Full-Time)                                          

AG600P        Agriculture SRP (Part-Time)

AG700F         Agriculture Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)

AG700P        Agriculture Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)

AG750F         Agriculture DRP (Full-Time)

AG750P        Agriculture DRP (Part-Time)

AG800F         Agriculture PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

AG800P        Agriculture PhD Thesis (Part-Time)


BI102             Plant Biology                                                                   


Prerequisites: Year 13/Form 7 or Foundation Biology

Semester 1: F at L and B at TON & E                  Semester 2: Not offered

Photosynthetic organisms form the basis of almost every food chain and ecosystem, and are one of the key elements underlying the rise of human civilization. This course takes an evolutionary approach to introducing the diversity of photosynthetic organisms – the major groups will be discussed in terms of structure, life cycles, phylogeny and physiology. Green plants are by far the most widely recognized of the photosynthetic organisms and these will be covered in greater detail. The importance of plants to the biosphere and to humans will also be discussed. Local examples will be used wherever possible.


BI103             General Biology                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at E

The course is designed to provide students with the basic concepts of biology. It explores the diversity in the living world, life processes, organisms and the environment, ecosystems and sustainable environments. It concludes by tackling applied issues relating to topics such as conservation and bioindicators of environmental status.


BI108             Animal Biology                                                              


Prerequisites: Year 13 or Foundation Biology

Semester 1: Not offered                  Semester 2: F at L and B at TON & E

This course introduces students to the diversity, functional morphology, life processes and evolution of the major groups of protozoans and animals so as to build a solid foundation for more advanced courses in Animal Biology. This course includes a brief study of eukaryotic cellular organization with focus on animal cells and introduces the basic concepts in animal biology. Important features with reference to life cycles and ecology will be included.


BI201             General Ecology                                                            


Prerequisites: BI102 and BI108

Semester 1: F at L and B at E                                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to general ecology, the science concerned with the complex interactions of organisms with each other and with their physical environment. The course studies ecology at the scale of the individual organism up to the scale of whole ecosystems and global processes. The study of those processes that influence the distribution, abundance and productivity of organisms and biological systems and consider how human activities alter these patterns and processes.


BI202             Invertebrate Biology                                                    


Prerequisites: BI108

Semester 1:  F at L and B at E                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is equivalent to MS202. Invertebrates make up ninety-five percent (95%) of all animals and play key role in all ecosystems and exhibit huge diversity. This course involves the study of invertebrate classification, identification, anatomy, functional biology and evolutionary adaptation to environmental change. A habitat-based approach is used to cover invertebrates living in terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments while using case studies to examine the economic and ecological importance of invertebrates in a local, regional and international context.


BI205             Genetics and Evolution                                               


Prerequisites: BI102 and BI108

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at E

We are what we are because of the DNA that we possess and the complex functions that it controls. This course starts off by taking a cellular level approach at DNA replication and behaviour, gene structure, regulation, function and building up on the concepts of heredity, cell cycle, and genetic aberrations. It introduces students to the processes of micro- and macro- evolution leading to speciation and population dynamics. This course also gives an insight into real-life application of genetics in relation to biotechnology and socio-economic issues.


BI206             Quantitative Biology                                                    


Prerequisites: One 100-level Biology course

Semester 1: F at L and B at E                                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to give students bio-statistical knowledge and skills to conduct biological research. Learning content will include the formulation of a biological research question, experimental design, data collection and exploratory data analysis and descriptive statistics. Statistical tests will be performed using various approaches (including correlation and regression, analysis of frequency data, analysis of variance and non-parametric tests).


BI207             Tropical Plant Biology                                                 


Prerequisites: BI102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The course will focus on broad concepts and ideas in tropical plant biology. In particular it will focus on tropical plant diversity, adaptations to tropical environments, ecological interactions, human uses and impacts on tropical ecosystems. General patterns will be illustrated with examples and our current understanding of the processes that underlie these will be discussed. Where possible, Pacific Island systems will be highlighted.


BI302             Plant Physiology 


Prerequisites: BI207

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2:  Not offered

Plant Physiology is a study of natural phenomena of living plants. It is the science concerned with the processes and functions, responses of plants to changes in the environment, and the growth and development which results from its responses. The course examines some fundamental processes of plants which include water transport, transpiration, mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, sugar transport and cellular respiration. The course also emphasizes on the environmental factors that affect the fundamental processes, effects of environmental stresses on plants and their mechanisms to deal with stresses.


BI304             Conservation Biology


Prerequisites: BI201 and BI206

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at E

This course examines conservation biology as a scientific discipline and its role in the ecological understanding of environmental issues. Patterns and reasons for losses of biodiversity such as human population growth, habitat destruction, fragmentation and introduced species will be examined using case studies from islands of the Pacific and the worldwide. The course will emphasise the underlying science used to set priorities, plan, monitor, and detect conservation problems particularly for species-and community-level conservation. The course will also explore the ecological inter-relationships between humans and threatened species, including how to increase public awareness and to integrate development and conservation.


BI305             Marine Biology


Prerequisites: BI202 or MS202

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on tropical marine biology from an ecological perspective. The three main tropical marine coastal environments, i.e. coral reef, seagrass meadow and mangrove forest, are studied and explored. Shallow water benthic communities, plankton and deep-sea organisms are studied and iconic Pacific marine megafauna are introduced. Practical is a major component of this course and includes laboratory and field work. A major compulsory field trip takes place during the mid-semester break.


BI307             Fish & Fisheries Biology


Prerequisites: MS202 or BI202 and BI206

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course focuses on marine fish biology, population dynamics and fisheries management. Topics for the fish biology component include taxonomy, anatomy, behavior and ecology. Topics for the fisheries biology component include an overview of fishing gears, methods, collection of samples and data, basic stock assessment and population dynamics. Fisheries management with special emphasis to the context of Pacific Island Countries is also covered. The Pacific tuna fishery is also studied. Practical is a major component of this course and includes laboratory and field work.


BI308             Environmental Microbiology


Prerequisites: Any two 200 level BI courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The field of Environmental Microbiology offers great potential for developing innovative strategies for management and protection of the environment. This course introduces students to the history of microbiology, concepts of microbial ecology and evolution, major developments to date, its impact on Earth, microbial diversity, population interactions at community and ecosystem levels and their applications. Applications will include microbial genomics, systematics and genetic engineering and how these impact important environmental issues.


BI309             Comparative Animal Physiology


Prerequisites: Any two 200 level BI courses

Semester 1: F at L and B at E                                        Semester 2: Not offered

The main objective of this course is to study the physical, chemical and biochemical principles for the functioning of body systems such as nervous, locomotion, cardiovascular, digestive, respiration, excretion, endocrine, and metabolism are compared in different animals including humans. The course also focuses on different adaptive mechanisms and responses to cope with the changes in both external and internal environment of animals. Certain pathological conditions like diabetes, hypertension, hypothyroidism, milk fever etc. occurred due to aberration in physiology of organ systems are also studied.


BI408             Advanced Environmental Microbiology                                        


Prerequisites: BI308

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The field of environmental microbiology offers great potential for developing new and innovative strategies for management and protection of the environment. The course covers areas of microbial ecology and evolution, population interactions, microbial communities and ecosystems and the biotechnological aspects of microbial ecology. In this course students learn of the vital role of microbes in marine, freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems by exploring the dynamic interactions that take place between microbial communities, the surroundings and higher organisms. They also study the role of microorganisms in the origin of mineral resources, microorganisms and pollution, bioremediation and current developments on energy flow through microbial communities.


BI409             Advanced Physiology                                                  


Prerequisites: BI309

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The interest in animal biology is further nurtured in the advancing field of physiology. This involves integrated approaches to understand further functional mechanisms of pharmacology, toxicology and pathology in the areas of nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, reproductive and the inflammatory responses. The main topics include: advances in signal transduction, pain physiology and bone physiology. Extensive examples and web resources will be indicated. The interaction between receptor and messenger is applied in the project works.


BI420             Research Project in Biology                                       


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

This course allows each student to develop a research project in biology consulting his/her supervisor. The project should run for at least 10-12 weeks and data should be collected for analysis. By teaching week 12 collected data in the research project should be analysed. Student(s) should prepare research reports(s), which must include Introduction, Literature Survey, Results, Discussion and Summary of findings. Students should prepare and present a seminar, which is assessed as one of the assessment items. Course results are based entirely (100%) on project work.


BI436             Molecular Biology                                                        


Prerequisites: BI205

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course exposes students to advanced theoretical and practical  knowledge of today’s rapidly progressing field of molecular biology.  The main topics include DNA structure, function and replication; transcription and translation; gene expression and regulation; the theoretical background and current applications of molecular biotechnology in microbial and multicellular organisms; transgenic organisms or GMOs and the ethical issues regarding genetic engineering; population genetics and molecular ecology; and the field conservation genetics.  In all these topics we will look at micro and macro evolution processes that have enabled evolutionary pathways in case study organisms, such as bacteria as well as eukaryotes at different taxonomic levels from unicellular organisms to warm blooded vertebrates.  Students will be exposed to basic molecular biology laboratory protocols and DNA analysis using web-based applications and search engines.


BI442             Biodiversity & Conservation                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

Major efforts have been made in recent years to alert us to the problems of conserving wildlife and habitat. Moreover, the discipline of conservation biology is now a direct hands-on human intrusion into the day-today lives of species all over the world, especially those that face the threat of imminent extinction. As a result there is a strong demand for training courses and advice for those interested in biodiversity and conservation. The aims of this course are to increase knowledge, facilitate learning and strengthen the generic and applied skills necessary for a career in the conservation sector.  This course is designed to complement the other courses taught in the Postgraduate Diploma in Biology/Environmental Science/Climate Change Science and Marine Studies. It is specifically designed for students wishing to do a Masters Degree and who are interested in furthering their general biodiversity, conservation and environmental science knowledge.


BI443             Advanced Biostatistics & Experimental Design  


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not Offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will equip Biology postgraduates with experimental research skills. Key topics include formulating and conducting research: (i) the critical use of scientific literature to develop ideas; (ii) planning and delivering the study; and, (iii} publication and dissemination of research outcomes. The formulation of testable hypotheses and archival research will focus on biological examples. Experimental design will include critiquing designs, pseudo-replication and resource-limitations that constrain experimental. Data analysis will include univariate (e.g. analysis of variance, simple regression) and multivariate (e.g. NMDS, redundancy analysis, PCA, MANOVAs, ANCOVAs, GLMs, etc.} methods. Students will learn about the research process, from formulating a question, to design, analysis and presentation.


BI600F          Biology SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                             


BI600P          Biology SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                            


BI700F          Biology Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                       


BI700P          Biology Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)    


BI800F          Biology PhD Thesis (Full-Time)


BI800P          Biology PhD Thesis (Part-Time)      


                                                   


CH101           Chemical Principles                                                    


Prerequisites: Year 13/Form 7 or Foundation Chemistry

Semester 1: F at L, E and O at K, SI, LAB, LTK, TON & SAM   Semester 2: Not offered

CH101 is a compulsory course for the completion of a major or minor in chemistry. This course aims to impart adequate knowledge with factual, theoretical and experimental background concerning introductory genera l chemistry. Lectures will selectively cover topics from analytical chemistry, atomic structure and chemical bonding and introductory physical chemistry.


CH102           Reactions & Principles of Organic Chemistry


Prerequisites: Year 13/Form 7 or Foundation Chemistry

Semester 1: Not offered                 Semester 2: F at L & E and O at K, SI, LAB,  LTK & TON

This course is designed to introduce and develop the fundamental concepts and methods employed in organic chemistry, the branch of chemistry that deals with compounds of carbon. The course covers a core area of the discipline, studying the functional groups of organic compounds (reactions and formations), and how to draw and name their structures. A good understanding of organic chemistry is important for students intending to become chemists (major or minor), and for those involved in cross-discipline studies. The course is designed to demonstrate that the subject is an integral part of modern technological development in diverse fields ranging from biology to material science and that it is still evolving.


CH105           Chemistry for Applied Science


Prerequisites: Year 12/Form 6 Chemistry or equivalent

Semester 1: F at L and O at E, K, LAB, LTK, SI & TON   Semester 2: Not offered

This course is not available to those taking a major or minor in chemistry and may not be used as a prerequisite for any other chemistry course. This course presents a broad-based introduction to modern chemistry for students not majoring in chemistry but requiring a background in chemistry for other sciences. The topics covered include sections on physical chemistry (thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry and the properties); inorganic chemistry (atomic structure, periodicity, main group and transition metal chemistry) and organic chemistry (reactions and uses of important aliphatic and aromatic compounds). Wherever possible examples from applied sections will be used in this course.


CH201           Organic Chemistry                                                        


Prerequisites: CH102

Semester 1: F at L& E                                                     Semester 2: Not offered

The course builds upon the fundamental concepts in organic chemistry that were introduced at the 100-level, and develops these for a better understanding and interpretation of the chemical behaviour of selected groups of organic compounds. The course includes a problem-based unit on the application of spectroscopic methods to organic structure elucidation, focusing on nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The concepts of reactivity and behaviour of aromatic and biologically relevant molecules, such as amino acids and sugars, are given a predominant treatment. Interleaved throughout the course will be the mechanistic interpretation of selected chemical transformations.


CH203           Physical Chemistry                                                       


Prerequisites: CH101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at E

This course is compulsory for the completion of a major or minor in Chemistry. It provides coverage of modern aspects of physical chemistry building on and complementing the material presented in CH101 and CH102. It is intended to provide students with the necessary background to study the applications of physical and chemical principles in industry and the environment which are taught in the 300-level chemistry courses. Such knowledge is essential for a complete understanding of the application of physical measurements to the elucidation of chemical structure and the mechanics of reactions.


CH204           Inorganic Chemistry


Prerequisites: CH101

Semester 1: Not offered                               Semester 2: F at L & E and O at K, & TON

This course is required for the completion of a major or minor in chemistry. The major objective of this course is to provide adequate theory and sufficient facts concerning modern inorganic chemistry in a mutually complementary manner. The reactions of ‘s’, ‘p’ and the ‘d’ block elements and their compounds together with a knowledge of their structure and bonding will be emphasised. Modern ideas of inorganic reaction mechanism will be introduced and discussed. This course will provide sufficient background to pursue higher studies in inorganic chemistry.


CH205           Chemistry for Civil Engineers


Prerequisites: MM212

Semester 1: Not offered                               Semester 2: F at L

Chemistry is the fundamental subject for civil engineers. It will help them to understand the properties of building materials, the natural environment and the reaction of building materials with the environment such as corrosion of metals and its durability. The course begins with an “atom first” approach and builds on to the more complex chemical concepts related to the chemistry of water, air, soil, earth, the atmosphere and the interaction with the environment.

 


CH301           Application & Methods of Instrumental Analysis


Prerequisites: CH201 and CH203

Semester 1: F at L                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The quantitative analysis of inorganic compounds and the structure and configuration determination of organic compounds form the basis of the course, which will also examine the role of analysis in chemistry and related fields. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the most commonly used instrumental methods of qualitative and quantitative analyses in both organic and inorganic chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the uses of the analytical methods, their limitations and their advantages. Discussions of theory will be minimal and non-mathematical but use of chemical literature will be included.


CH303           Applied Chemistry                                                        


Prerequisites: CH201 and CH203 or CH204

Semester 1: F at L                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to give students an insight into the applied aspects of chemistry: physical, inorganic and organic. The emphasis is on chemicals and chemical processes that play an important role in modern life. This course consists of three topics, which are: 1. Applied Organic Chemistry 2. Applied Inorganic Chemistry and 3.Corrosion of Metals, Power Storage and Fuel Cells.


CH306           Special Topics in Chemistry                                       


Prerequisites: Two 200 level CH courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course consists of four special topics chosen from subject areas in the general fields of organic chemistry, physical chemistry, inorganic chemistry, analytical chemistry and geochemistry. The actual topics offered may vary from year to year, depending upon availability of resources, staff, and expertise.


CH311           Marine Chemistry                                                         


Prerequisites: CH203 or CH204

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the functioning of the marine environment as a chemical system. Chemical principles from first and second year courses are used to investigate processes controlling the geochemical balance of the oceans. The emphasis will be on inorganic as well as organic constituents. The laboratory component consisting of set experiments, with a small number of students per lab session, enables the students to do individual work. This approach helps build up the students’ confidence and skills, which no doubt will equip them with the basic practical skills necessary for chemical investigations in the marine environment.


CH312           Environmental Chemistry 


Prerequisites: CH204

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is designed to provide adequate understanding of environmental chemistry, which is emerging as a mature, viable discipline. A clear understanding of the sources, reactions, transport and the fate of chemical entities in air, water and soil will be presented in sufficient pedagogical detail to develop an appreciation of current environmental pollution and management issues of global and regional concern. The practical component will include set experiments, which will be done by students on an individual basis. This approach should build confidence in students in carrying out scientific analyses of various pollutants while at the same time, it enables them to improve their practical analytical skills.


CH405           Biochemistry 


Prerequisites: CH306

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course assumes a good background knowledge in organic chemistry at the degree level. It deals with the study of the chemical processes and transformations in living organisms. It also deals with the structure and function of cellular components, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and other bio-molecules. It will be taught as a chemistry emphasis biochemistry course mostly by the chemistry staff with some help from the Biology staff. This course not only deals with the theoretical aspects of biochemistry, but also emphasises the importance of the applications of the various biochemical techniques in postgraduate research.


CH413           Chemistry of Natural Products 


Prerequisites: Two 300 Level CH courses

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course will review the steps involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The chemistry and biological activity of the following classes of natural products will be discussed: steroids, terpenoids, saponins, alkaloids, prostaglandins, polyacetylenes, quinones, pheromones and oxygen heterocyclic compounds.


CH414           Instrumental Analysis                                                 


Prerequisites: CH301

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This is one of the core chemistry courses for the postgraduate chemistry programmes at USP. Students wishing to proceed with postgraduate studies at USP in any area of chemistry should be proficient in the use of modern instruments used in research in their selected research area. The course deals with advanced aspects of instrumentation such as infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and thermal techniques. It also deals with the applications of chromatographic techniques in separation science.


CH420           Research Project in Chemistry                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

This course allows the students to develop the intellectual and practical skills demanded by special study and is suitable for students who have an appropriate interest and aptitude. The student will formulate and investigate a problem or identify and investigate a topic, as appropriate, in consultation with a staff member who has experience in the chosen area.


CH421           Quantitative Analysis                                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The course provides advanced coverage of the concepts and techniques of quantitative analysis. It builds on the basic principles covered in undergraduate chemistry courses. The topics to be covered include accuracy, precision, error propagation and statistical analysis of results, gravimetric procedures, redox equilibria and applications, complexation equilibria and applications, non-aqueous media procedure, separation processes, master variable diagrams and some electrochemical methods used in quantitative analysis.


CH451           Advanced Environmental Chemistry


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with a clear understanding of some of the important chemical processes that occur in nature as well as those that form the basis of contemporary environmental issues. Topics covered include: environmental chemistry of heavy elements; environmental chemistry of nutrients; environmental chemistry of pesticides and other organic pollutants; and a section on the role of chemistry in understanding and managing environmental issues significant to the South Pacific Region.

CH600F         Chemistry SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                          

CH600P        Chemistry SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                       

CH700F         Chemistry Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                   

CH700P        Chemistry Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                  

CH800F         Chemistry PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                            

CH800P        Chemistry PhD Thesis (Part-Time)

EM600F        Environmental Science SRP (Full-Time)                                                                   

EM600P        Environmental Science SRP (Part-Time)                                                                 

EM700F        Environmental Science Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                          

EM700P        Environmental Science Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                   

EM750F        Environmental Science DRP (Full-Time)                  

EM750P        Environmental Science DRP (Part-Time)                 

EM800F        Environmental Science PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                     

EM800P        Environmental Science PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                            

ES106            Earth Science                                                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course provides a broad introduction to the principles of Earth Science, helping you to understand the processes that have, and indeed continue to, shape our planet, often in dramatic and spectacular ways. As well as looking at mechanisms of change within our planet and on its surface, we will take a close look at Earth materials (rocks and minerals), understanding how to identify them and interpret them in terms of their formation. Major topics covered include plate tectonic theory (and its importance as the ‘grand unifying theory’ of the Earth Sciences), natural hazards (including volcanoes and earthquakes), economic geology, and a glimpse of the role Earth processes play in determining our climate. Examples from the South Pacific will be used to illustrate many of the topics covered and a major field trip to different parts of Fiji will help to illustrate many of the topics covered.


ES203            Physical Geology


Prerequisites: ES106 or Admission to Bachelor of Engineering (Civil)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course takes off from where you left geology in ES106. A major component of the course is the detailed study of the different rock types, including their classification, petrogenesis, distribution, mineralogical composition, and field relations. We will also look in more detail at the minerals that make up our rocks and the basic principles of crystallography and mineral chemistry. Complementary laboratory sessions place emphasis on both hand specimen and microscopic studies of minerals and rocks. A field trip partway through the semester consolidates the work done in laboratory sessions and lectures and places it in a broader context. Emphasis is placed wherever possible on examples and rock types from the Pacific Islands and similar geological environments.


ES301            Mining & Mineral Resources                                    


Prerequisites: ES203

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides detailed knowledge of ore geology, and geophysical and geochemical methods used for the exploration of mineral soil, hydrocarbon, geothermal and water resources. Lectures, laboratory exercises, and field-based research are used to help students develop knowledge of the subject, and improve their research and presentation skills. Associated issues such as environment, economic feasibility and engineering requirements will be discussed, particularly where relevant to the Pacific region. The mitigation of geo-hazards will also be studied. The course will include several field exercises around Viti Levu. A major geological fieldtrip to one of the mining areas in Viti Levu will be held over 3-4 days.


ES302            Geological Mapping                                                     


Prerequisites: ES203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This is a field-based course designed to establish proficiency in the fundamentals of geological mapping and section logging. Through lectures, practicals, and fieldwork, you will develop skills in stratigraphy, fossil identification, the manufacture and interpretation of thin sections, core logging and rock description. The bulk of the course will involve applying these skills to the geological mapping of the landscape and how we interpret our field observations in terms of geological history.


ES303            Hot Rocks & Humanity                                                


Prerequisites: ES203

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course begins by considering the large-scale tectonic context of igneous activity. It deals with the physical, chemical and mineralogical nature of molten rocks and how they may be classified. It considers the emplacement of magma above and beneath the Earth’s surface and the consequences of this for igneous lithology and structure. The course describes the characteristic landforms of igneous terrains. Finally, it tackles human interaction with hot rocks from the point of view of both hazards (such as volcanoes) and of resources (such as geothermal energy, economic minerals and soils).


ES406            Atoll Geoscience                                                           


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is intended for MA or MSc students requiring detailed knowledge about the geology and geomorphology of atoll environments, particularly in the Pacific. It aims to provide students with an understanding of the variations in geology and geomorphology found on modern atolls, particularly in the central Pacific, an understanding of the history of ideas about atoll origins and development particularly the role of late Quaternary sea-level change, an understanding of the various ways in which atoll islands form in different places, experience of commonly-used methods of geoscientific field investigation and interpretation of reef islands.

ES600F          Earth Science SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                     

ES600P          Earth Science SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                    

ES700F          Earth Science Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                              

ES700P          Earth Science Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                             

ES750F          Earth Science DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                    

ES750P          Earth Science DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                   

ES800F          Earth Science PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                       

ES800P          Earth Science PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                      

EV201            Environment & Society in the South Pacific


Prerequisites: GE101 or GE102

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This flagship environmental course considers the meaning of the environment, not only in a physical and human sense, but within the context of philosophy and belief. It discusses how people make choices about the environment in the face of uncertainty. It considers what we understand by environment, and how this varies between cultures and over time. The course deals with environmental ethics, how the environment may be considered within the framework of economics, and how the environment may be quantified. It introduces themes such as resource management and sustainable development, personal responsibilities and roles in environmental and social problems, and how environmental problems and solutions are articulated and evaluated.


EV301            Environmental Impact Assessment                                                                       


Prerequisites: EV201

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The purpose of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) is to determine the positive and negative impacts that development projects may have on the environment. The potential impacts range from physical and biological to social and economic. EIAs oblige decision makers to consider environmental impacts in any decision about whether to proceed with a project. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills necessary to write and to process Environmental Impact Assessments and to understand their application in the context of the South Pacific.


EV302            Sustainable Development                                                                                         


Prerequisites: EV201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course considers the principles of sustainable development in a global context. It assesses and rethinks the meaning of sustainable development. It considers the history of sustainable development thought, the part played by environmental activism and grass roots movements and the shift of sustainable development into mainstream thinking. It deals with the problems and prospects of creating sustainable societies. It discusses the economics of sustainable development, the role of green and blue economics and the social costs of environmental degradation. It considers ideas of individual and corporate legal responsibility for sustainable development. The course concludes by offering possible solutions to problems of food production, environmental degradation, industrialisation, energy use and population growth.


EV303            Environmental Hazard & Disaster Risk Management                                      


Prerequisites: EV201

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is intended to provide fundamental understanding of environmental hazard and different aspects of disaster management. Students are exposed to the key issues in environmental hazard, as well as the concept and functions of disaster management, prevention, and reduction. A particular focus will be put on community’s resilience in the context of the Pacific Island Countries. It would also provide basic knowledge, skills pertaining to planning, organising and decision-making process for disaster risk reduction.


EV402            Natural Resources & Environment


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This postgraduate course focuses on the natural resources of the Pacific Islands which include biodiversity (terrestrial and marine), water, soils, minerals, geothermal energy, and others. Emphasis will be placed on the nature of human resource-use systems in the Pacific Islands; how these systems have affected terrestrial and marine resources; and actions that can be taken to protect natural resources and to promote environmentally and culturally sustainable development in the Pacific islands. Emphasis is also placed on obtaining a better understanding of the main concepts and recent trends in global Political Ecology, in particular UN agreements. We aim, for instance, to identify holistic, indigenous community based approaches to preserving ecosystem services to illustrate Pacific leadership in the implementation of the various UN agreements, and do identify respective problems in the region.


EV405            Field & Laboratory Techniques in Environmental Studies


Prerequisites: At least one 300 Level GE, ES or EV course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course covers the main data gathering methods used in environmental analysis, both in the field and in the laboratory. These include biological, chemical, geological and physical parameters and the study of waters, soils, the biota, etc. Methods of gathering social data are also discussed. The presentation of data in graphs and maps, the use of geographical information systems and remote sensing are included as well as data analysis and modelling. Students will also practise these techniques. The basic approach will be the introduction of a topic by the instructor or the students; students will then be expected to perform the necessary measurements or data gathering and analysis. Students’ projects will include an in-depth study using different techniques and the presentation of a seminar on their findings, at the end of the semester.


EV420            Research Project in Environment                            


Prerequisites: At least one 300 Level GE, ES or EV course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is tailored to the individual students requirements and is designed as a pathway to work on a particular thesis topic.


GE101           Physical Geography: Global Biophysical Environments


Prerequisites: Core Discipline: Year 13/Form 7, Foundation or equivalent.

                                Service Course: Year 12/Form 6, Preliminary or equivalent

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: B at C

This course provides an introduction to the study of the Earth’s biophysical environment. We begin by considering the Earth’s place in the Universe, its origins and development, and the nature and evolution of the Earth’s surface.  We consider mechanisms of weathering, mass wasting, and denudation that operate to carve the global surface into the spectacular array of landforms that characterise Earth. The course goes on to deal with the global atmospheric system and the natural and human-induced changes to which this has been subjected. We consider the behaviour of the hydrological system and the interactions between groundwater, soil moisture, and surface water components. Finally, the course deals with the biological world, how this has evolved over time, and the role of natural and human factors in shaping its pattern.


GE102           Human Geography: People, Places & Environments


Prerequisites: Core Discipline: Year 13/Form 7, Foundation or equivalent.

                                Service Course: Year 12/Form 6, Preliminary or equivalent

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L

This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the wide field of human geography. This will create a solid basis for a number of the Geography 200- and 300-level courses. The discipline is conventionally subdivided into a number of areas including economic, social, cultural, political, urban and rural geography. Old and new ideas and debates within these sub-fields will be exposed. In order to pursue these debates students will be asked to explore examples from many different parts of the world. In most cases, students will be asked to relate what they learn to their own situations as people of the Pacific Islands. Practical classes and field research will give the opportunity to learn various techniques that human geographers use to research questions in their discipline.


GE201           Biogeography: Plants, Animals & the Human Environment


Prerequisites: 100 Level GE or GS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course focuses on the nature and distribution of the world’s plant and animal resources, with emphasis on the Pacific Islands. Particular attention will be paid to the importance of plants and animals within the context of their characteristic ecosystems or biomes and the importance of physical, biotic and human factors in shaping ecosystems. Emphasis will also be placed on the ecological and cultural importance of plants and animals to sustainable human habitation of the earth. In this context, the ethno-botanical, ethno-zoological and, in particular, the economic importance of plants and animals to Pacific peoples will be examined. Two field trips are part of this course.


GE202           Agriculture, Food & Nutrition in the Developing World


Prerequisites: GE101 or GE102 or TE113

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the importance of agricultural and food systems and nutrition in the `developing` world. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of increasing malnutrition and food system change as major obstacles to meaningful national development, especially in the Pacific Islands. The course is of particular relevance for students interested in careers in national planning, environmental or resource management and food and nutrition development or home economics.


GE203           Social & Economic Geography of the Third World                    


Prerequisites: GE102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course focuses on social and economic issues in the Third World. Case studies and examples are taken from Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Pacific Islands. These provide a basis for comparative analysis. Although description plays an important role in this course, the major emphasis is on explaining how and why the structures and situations observed have evolved, and their impacts on people’s livelihoods. The questions discussed in class will be observed and researched in the ‘real’ world during a field laboratory, which an integral part of the course. This course usually requires attendance to a field school.


GE205           Physical Environments of the Wet Tropics


Prerequisites: GE101 or ES106

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This is a broad-based physical geography course suitable for second-year undergraduates in Geography, Earth Science, Environmental Science/Studies and related majors. The course has three main components: the terrestrial environment (geomorphology), the aquatic environment (hydrology) and the atmospheric environment (meteorology and climatology). Its particular focus is on rivers and the hydrological cycle; climate extremes in the Pacific, especially the El Nino phenomenon and tropical cyclones; denudation processes on volcanic islands; and the karst geomorphology of limestone islands. Examples will be drawn both from the Pacific Islands and from other environments worldwide. The course emphasises the use of quantitative techniques and the development of numerical skills. A four-day field trip to a remote part of Fiji to investigate tropical island landscapes is an essential (and enjoyable) part of this course.


GE207           Urban Well-Being


Prerequisites: GE102 or approval of HOS or Nominee

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The course provides students with an understanding of the nature and causes of social inequalities and uneven development in an urban context.  It examines urbanisation from the perspective of well-being and sustainable livelihoods.  The topics covered include urbanisation as an historical process, migration behavior, squatter settlements and the urban informal sector.  These issues are considered within the context of sustainable livelihood approaches and theories of inequality and uneven development.  Pacific and other Third World countries are used as case studies to highlight the challenges of urbanisation.  This course usually requires attendance to a field school.


GE301           Applied Pacific Island Biogeography & Ethnobiology


Prerequisites: GE201 or any 200 Level BI course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the biogeography of the Pacific Islands and on obtaining a better understanding of the main trends, theories, concepts, terms and techniques of the field of biogeography and their relevance to island biogeography. The present status and development in the Pacific Islands will also be examined, with particular emphasis on the role of biogeography (and related fields that employ bio-geographical theories, concepts, knowledge and techniques) in promoting sustainable development in the Pacific Islands.


GE302           Applied Rural & Agricultural Geography of the Pacific Islands


Prerequisites: GE202 or GE203 or GE207

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course examines rural areas of the developing world with particular focus on the Rural livelihoods of the Pacific Islands. The study include content coverage of theories, conceptual Approaches and actual practices of rural living for improved understanding and appreciation of its Unique natural, social, economic, political and cultural landscapes. Guest lecturers from relevant government Departments & NGOs are usually invited to share insights of their institutional contribution in rural areas.


GE303           The Geography of Development in the Pacific


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level GE course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores the geography of social and economic development in the Pacific region, with particular emphasis on people’s livelihoods. The course focusses on three geographical components of the region (Latin America, Pacific Asia and the Pacific Islands) and describes, explains and compares the highly differentiated patterns of development that exist within and between these places. This form of comparative analysis will allow the experience and prospects of the Pacific Islands to be placed within the evolving regional and global context.


GE304           Resource Conservation & Management


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level GE course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course will examine the principles and problems of resource systems, environmental conservation and resource management with particular reference to Pacific Island ecosystems. Lectures will stress the ecological approach and include the following topics: Pacific island resource systems, effects of human induced disturbances on these systems, the role of conservation and ecological principles in the development process, the role of geographers and the importance of the geographic perspective in resource analysis, conservation, and management, and environmental impact assessment.


GE306           Pacific Geoscience                                                        


Prerequisites: GE101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

In this course the dynamic nature of the Earth`s crust, responsible for earthquakes and volcanic activity, will be discussed with emphasis on how crustal movements affect Pacific Islands. The causes of island uplift and sinking in relation to changes in sea level will be outlined with respect to atolls, volcanic and limestone islands. The implications of the dynamic Earth for life, especially on Pacific Islands, will be debated and some attention given to human control of nature. A three-day field trip within Viti Levu will form an integral part of the course, which includes a practical exercise and oral presentation.


GE402           Third World Development


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course introduces students to an area of study generally referred to as the ‘geography of development’ through an examination of major development problems confronting the Third World. Students will obtain an understanding of the Third World as a region and an understanding of the main issues, trends and concepts in the following areas: population, urbanisation, industrialisation, foreign investment, international trade, and planning.


GE403           Research Methods in Geography


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

GE403 provides the basic research, analytical and presentation skills required for archival and field research in Geography, Environmental Studies and related disciplines. The main emphases are on the skills required to formulate research projects and hypotheses, to write research and funding proposals, to gather and analyse data, and to write-up and present the findings required for master’s theses and major research projects. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the sensitivities, difficulties, intellectual property rights issues, challenges, advantages of and opportunities for carrying out original applied research in the Pacific Islands.


GE404           Selected Studies: Studies in the Geography of the Pacific


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

This course focuses on aspects of the geography of the Pacific Islands appropriate for particular students. It is a course tailored to a particular student`s interests and/or requirements given their planned thesis topic. This course will provide students with a detailed knowledge of a particular aspect of Pacific Islands geography, such as land-population relationship in Kiribati, the home gardening potential in urban Vanuatu, or the evidence for recent coastline changes in the Southern Cook Islands, Pacific industrialisation, produce marketing in Fiji, an introduction to appropriate archival sources of information, knowledge of appropriate methods of data analysis and interpretation.


GE407           Advanced Pacific Island Biogeography & Ethnobiology


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This postgraduate course focuses on the biogeography of the Pacific Islands. Specific emphasis is placed on obtaining a better understanding of the main trends, theories, concepts, terms and techniques in the field of biogeography and the relevance of these to island and marine biogeography. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to apply the concepts, techniques and general geographical, biological and ecological knowledge they have acquired in previous courses, from field work and from their own personal experience.


GE409           Environmental Change in the Pacific                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

Talk of the human-enhanced greenhouse effect and the ways in which it may affect our lives has made many people more aware of environmental change. We have come to realise that the environment is and has always been in a state of continuous change and that lifestyles must be adjusted accordingly. This course focuses on the Pacific Basin, a vast Region,which can be considered a microcosm of the entire surface of the Earth and which has suffered from being marginalised in most accounts of earth-surface processes and phenomena.


GE420           Research Project in Geography


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course focuses on a particular field of Geography selected specifically to mesh with the interests and expertise of individual students. The course is tailored to the individual students’ requirements and is designed as a pathway to work on a particular thesis topic. The course introduces students to the acquisition of data, whether from the field or the archive, it teaches appropriate methods of data analysis, and provides information on how observations and measurements may be employed to solve geographical problems and to test geographical hypotheses.

GE600F         Geography SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                          

GE600P         Geography SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                        

GE700F         Geography Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                   

GE700P         Geography Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                 

GE750F         Geography DRP (Full-Time)

GE750P         Geography DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                                                          

GE800F         Geography PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                            

GE800P         Geography PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                          

GS100           Geography Techniques & Methods                        


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to a range of geography techniques, with particular emphasis on physical field measurements, mapping, questionnaire and survey design and implementation, statistical analysis and geographic data presentation. Students are introduced to concepts in these topics, and then work through field and classroom exercises to enhance their knowledge and skills in these areas. A range of basic field survey equipment is used, together with maps, aerial images, spatial data and qualitative survey. The course provides students with a set of fundamental field and analytical skills that they will use in later courses in physical and human geography, geospatial science and other field and earth science related areas.


GS101           Geospatial Information Systems


Prerequisites: GS100 and IS104

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

GS101 introduces geospatial science students to the fundamentals of geospatial information systems and how we represent, manage and display geographic data in the digital environment. Concepts are taught using the Python programming language which is widely using in the Geospatial Industry in both free and open source software and proprietary packages such as ArcGIS. Students are introduced to geographic data models and databases and the use of objects and classes to represent real-world features. The course provides an introduction to solving problems by writing simple Python scripts to manipulate geospatial data and interface with both local and online databases. Ways of visualising data are addressed using graphics libraries and the free and open source software Quantum GIS.


GS200           Quantitative Methods                                                


Prerequisites: One 100 Level GE or GS course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

GS200 provides students with a foundation in data analysis and problem-solving specific to quantitative research in geography and related disciplines. Building on classical descriptive and inferential statistics the course introduces the student to statistical data analysis in the geographic context.  Students learn about measuring geographic distributions and statistical tests of comparison and correlation as they relate to problems in geography and related disciplines. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the role spatial autocorrelation plays in spatial statistical methods.  Students learn how to analyse spatial data for patterns, clusters and spatial relationships. Also covered are data handling and numerical methods dealing with sampling protocols, error and uncertainty. The course makes use of effective methods of quantitative data display and graphing and requires the use of statistical and GIS software.


GS201           Geographic Information Systems 1


Prerequisites: One 100 Level GE or GS course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), with particular emphasis on spatial data structures, data entry and editing, digital cartography, spatial queries, and introductory spatial analysis. These concepts are covered through lectures and readings, together with the development of practical skills using GIS software in a computer laboratory environment. This course is intended to provide a foundation of GIS knowledge and skills that will be used in later courses in geospatial science. The course is also a useful introduction to the field of GIS for students from other disciplines who will work with spatial information.


GS211           Remote Sensing 1                                                         


Prerequisites: One 100 Level GE or GS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course provides students with a foundation in the basic principles of remote sensing of the environment. This course covers a range of multi-scale remotely sensed imagery. Topics include image histograms and image statistics, energy-matter interactions and spectral signatures of Earth features. Traditional supervised and unsupervised image classification as well as more advanced automated feature recognition and extraction are examined. Enhancement indices such as band rationing, vegetation indices and geological material indices and multivariate statistical analysis of multiband imagery using principal components analysis will also be covered. In a multi-scale approach students will investigate global datasets derived from satellite imagery and broad scale imagery of interest to the study of continents and oceans.


GS231           Cartography & Geovisualisation                              


Prerequisites: GS201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course builds on GS201 (Geographic Information Systems I) and focuses on understanding the relationship between geospatial data and visual communication as a key to effective use of geographic information.  The main objective of this course is to teach students modern professional mapmaking skills.  Students are taught the fundamental principles of map design, which include: map layout, typography, scale, generalization and projections; mapping techniques, including choropleth mapping, cartograms and other multivariate mapping approaches; and methods of map production including web-based mapping and geovisualisation.


GS301           Geographic Information Systems 2                         


Prerequisites: GS201

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This is an advanced course in Geographic Information Systems (GIS focusing on the application and benefits of more sophisticated spatial data models and analysis techniques. Emphasis is placed on the relational database model as a framework for spatial data modelling. Topics include network models and analysis, linear referencing, raster data modelling and analysis, advanced vector data analysis, geoprocessing and programming, data quality and uncertainty, generalisation and aggregation, differential GPS, and spatial conversion and transformation. The goal of the course is to build students’ abilities to operate independently in a GIS environment. Emphasis is placed on hands-on problem solving activities and communicating results of spatial data modelling and analysis through written reports and maps.


GS302           Field of Survey of Pacific Island Environments                           


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level GS course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

Pacific Island countries are characterised by ‘Small Islands: Big Ocean’. The available land and coastal zone is home to a wealth of biodiversity and natural resources. Pacific Island people use these natural resources to provide food, generate wealth and maintain healthy, sustainable ecosystems for future generations. GS302 provides students with the skills, knowledge and understanding to plan and conduct field surveys in support of mapping and sampling for a range of environments and ecosystems encountered in Pacific Island Countries. Students will learn to select appropriate ways to plan and layout transects and grids using field survey methods and implement appropriate sampling strategies to measure key environmental indicators. The course will focus on traditional surveying methods as well as geodesy and satellite navigation, mobile GIS applications, statistical sampling design and data analysis. Students will work in a variety of environments and ecosystems including natural areas, the coastal zone, plantations; and the role of field survey in risk assessment and hazard management will be discussed.


GS311           Pacific Islands Remote Sensing                                


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level GS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

Pacific Island countries are characterised by ‘Small Islands: Big Ocean’. The available land and coastal zone is home to a wealth of biodiversity and natural resources. Pacific Island people use these natural resources to provide food, generate wealth and maintain healthy, sustainable ecosystems for future generations. GS311 provides students with the skills, knowledge and understanding to plan and conduct high resolution image acquisition, enhancement and interpretation for a range of environments encountered in Pacific Island Countries. The course will focus on aerial imagery from conventional photography, UAVs (Drones) and the new generation of high spatial resolution satellites. The course covers image enhancement, manual 2D and 3D interpretation of imagery, softcopy photogrammetry and finally automated feature extraction. Softcopy photogrammetry will focus on the production of image mosaics and extraction of digital elevation models. Students will work on a selection of environments including the coastal zone, natural areas, plantations, agricultural landscapes and degraded environments. The role of imagery in risk assessment and hazard management will be discussed.


GS350           Industry Experience Project in Geospatial Science


Prerequisites: GS301 (for Bachelor of Geospatial Science Students only)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This is the capstone course for Bachelor of Geospatial Science students. Under attachment to an industry partner students will be challenged to undertake a real-world project using appropriate geospatial technologies and methods. Students will investigate and implement geospatial solutions specific to their chosen specialisation. As such the course challenges students to move to the next level as professional geospatial scientists and bring new insight as to how geospatial technologies can be employed to the benefit of Pacific Island Countries. Industry attachment partners include Government Departments, NGO’s and the private sector. Projects will draw from such fields as risk assessment for Pacific Island Communities, state of the environment monitoring and reporting, coastal zone management and conservation planning and management. Students will be required to demonstrate expertise in the areas of geospatial databases, geospatial analysis methods, statistical analysis, reporting and cartographic output in the form of maps and web-based delivery. This course challenges students as professional geospatial scientists allowing them to develop their skills, knowledge and understanding to an advanced level in their chosen field of specialty.

GS600P         Geospatial Science SRP (Part Time)                         

GS600F         Geospatial Science SRP (Full Time)                           

GS700P         Geospatial Science Master’s Thesis (Part Time)  

GS700F         Geospatial Science Master’s Thesis (Full Time)    

GS750F         Geospatial Science DRP (Full-Time)                         

GS750P         Geospatial Science DRP (Part-Time)

MS101          Introduction to Marine Resources Management

Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the many aspects of marine resources management particularly the developments following the adoption of the Law of the Sea Convention. This course stresses the importance of managing these resources wisely if the people are to benefit from these new opportunities. Students will learn about resource management by looking at national policies, law, regional cooperation, international treaties and conventions. This course is on the global perspective of ocean resources management and introduces many basic concepts of environmental protection, sustainable resource utilisation and international law.


MS111          Introduction to Marine Science for Pacific Islands


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This is an introductory course for all students entering Marine Studies. The course provides an interesting introduction to the principles and application of marine science, including physical, biological and chemical processes, living and non-living resources, human uses and impacts, and environmental management and sustainable development. Content focuses on the Pacific islands, but in the context of marine science on a world scale.


MS200          Marine Resource Economics                                     


Prerequisites: Any 100 Level MS, EC or MA course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course is designed to enhance students’ understanding on the application of economic concepts and models to address policy questions with respect to marine resources. The course provides a theoretical and an applied context to the key issues and policy challenges in marine resource use and management in general and with some specific reference to the Pacific Islands. Economic underpinnings of issues on equity, efficiency and sustainability are analysed by looking at activities such as fisheries, aquaculture, marine protected areas, recreational fishery, ports and shipping and seabed mining.


MS202          Invertebrate Biology                                                    


Prerequisites: MS111 and BI108

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

Equivalent to BI202. Invertebrates play key roles in all ecosystems and exhibit huge diversity. This course involves the study of invertebrate classification, identification, anatomy, functional biology and evolutionary adaptation to environmental change. A habitat-based approach is used to cover invertebrates living in terrestrial, marine and freshwater environments while using case studies to examine the economic and ecological importance of invertebrates in a local, regional and international contexts. The course also provides a link between 100-level and animal-oriented 300-level degree courses in biology, particularly MS305.


MS204          Tropical Seafood                                                           


Prerequisites:  MS111 or MS101 or BI108 or CH101

Semester 1: B at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides a general introduction to seafood in Pacific Island Countries. Seafood resources, nutrition, spoilage, poisoning, handling, processing (both traditional and modern), preservation and quality assurance are examined. This includes a critical analysis of the role of women in traditional and modern fish processing industries. Regional and global seafood quality issues are examined in some detail and students are expected to design their own seafood business using economic engineering principles. The course requires a low level of applied science and technology; the emphasis will be on field-trips and assignments rather than on laboratory classes.


MS205          International Law of the Sea                                     


Prerequisites:  MS101 or MS111 or  LW110 or LW111 or LW112 or LW113

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

The course provides an introduction to the Law of the Sea Convention for non-law students wishing to understand the international framework governing the oceans and their resources. Topics covered include the history of the Convention, ocean zones and the associated rights and duties of States, the rules governing the access to the oceans, the use and conservation of her resources, the protection of the marine environment and other marine uses.


MS206          Maritime Skills & Techniques                                   


Prerequisites: MS111 or MS101 or industry level qualifications and/or work experience in the maritime sector (approval of Head of School or nominee)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L

Working on small vessels at sea is one of the most dangerous of all professions. This course provides students intending to work in fisheries and marine science in the South Pacific with a basic competence in small boat operations, safety at sea, position finding, navigation and pilotage. This skills-based course is set in an academic framework of geography, cartography, meteorology and oceanography. Marine survey techniques differ from those on land. Students are introduced to a range of sampling techniques, including echo-sounders, global positioning system, salinity and temperatures profiling, plankton nets, fishing methods, grabs, corers and in-water sampling techniques. Students will spend 4 weeks on industrial attachment to  practise some of these skills.


MS210          Marine Transport                                                         


Prerequisites:  MS101 or MS111 or industry level qualifications and/or work experience in marine transport sector (approval of Head of School or nominee)

Semester 1: B at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

Marine Transport is the lifeline of Pacific Island Countries, essential at almost all levels of society from village transport and artisanal fishing to the intra-regional and international trade of nation states. It is also arguably the greatest technological heritage legacy of Pacific peoples. Today the industry is characterised by a vicious cycle of old ships replaced with old ships. Reliable and affordable marine transport is a cornerstone necessity for almost any area of socio-economic development. The situation is compounded by the industry’s current dependency on increasingly unaffordable fossil fuels. This course covers history, legislation, the current industry at international and domestic levels and focuses on the challenges faced by the current industry and future options.


MS211          Marine Geology Sedimentology


Prerequisites: Any 100 Level science course

Semester 1: B at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is about the rocks and sediments in the ocean basins, their distribution, composition and history. The South Pacific Island Nations all lie within the deep oceanic basins but most of our activity and concern centre on are the near-shore regions. Hence this course is geared towards understanding near-shore processes and sedimentation. Other aspects of marine geology addressed in this course include ocean circulation, plate tectonics, sea-level history, skeletal microplankton, geochemistry as a tool for paleo-climatology, and critical events in global palaeo-oceanography.


MS213          Physical Oceanography                                              


Prerequisites: Any 100 Level science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The course explores the physical forces that act in the oceans and describes the response of ocean water to these forces. The course covers the physical properties of seawater and the application of physical laws to oceanography, heat transfer, ocean currents, waves and tides. The course emphasises the relationship of physical oceanography with ocean ecology.


MS301          Ocean Resources Management in the Pacific Islands


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level MS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

This course analyses the actions taken by Pacific Island Countries individually and collectively, in response to their rights and obligations under the 1982 Law of the Sea Convention and after the UN Conference on Environment and Development in 1992. National and regional policies, administrative arrangements, national laws, regional and international treaties and regional organisations are examined. Various different uses of the sea are studied with emphasis on case studies from the South Pacific Region.


MS302          Integrated Coastal Zone Management


Prerequisites: One 200 Level MS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

This course articulates some key issues in Integrated Coastal Management, particularly with reference to Pacific Island Countries. The coastal zone and its biophysical characteristics are introduced at the beginning together with the international framework for an integrated approach. These set the stage for the various processes and methods involved in integrated coastal management. The course outlines the principles and tools that give practical guidance to assist in the process. The course focuses on the interrelationships and interdependence between and among sectors, agencies, disciplines and levels of governance for complementarities, duplication and conflicts to enable the fostering of better cooperation and coordination to achieve the goals of integrated management and sustainable development.


MS304          Ocean Governance & Policy                                      


Prerequisites: MS205 or MS206 or MS200 or MS210

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines ocean governance and policy at the international, regional and national levels with an emphasis on practice in the Pacific Islands region. Emerging issues in the maritime sector, the role of institutions in the management of marine living resources and the principles behind the management of non-living resources are examples of topics addressed. Students and practitioners alike will benefit and be able to develop policy and plans consistent with laws, guide implementation and promote responsible ocean governance.


MS305          Marine Biology                                                              


Prerequisites: BI202 or MS202

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on tropical marine biology from an ecological perspective. The three main tropical marine coastal environments, i.e. coral reef, seagrass meadow and mangrove forest, are studied and explored. Shallow water benthic communities, plankton and deep-sea organisms are presented, and iconic Pacific marine megafauna are introduced. Practical is a major component of this course and includes laboratory and field work. A major compulsory field trip takes place during the mid-semester break.


MS306          Coral Reef Ecology & Management                        


Prerequisites:MS202 or MS211 or MS213 or MS204 or MS206 or MS200 or MS205 or MS210 or B1201 or B1206.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

Coral reefs are one of the richest and most productive ecosystems in the world. Coral reefs are under serious threat globally, not least in the Pacific region. This course examines the origins of coral reefs (reef types and formation); the biology of corals and other reef organisms (taxonomy, feeding, growth and reproduction); ecosystem structure and function (particularly coral/zooxanthellae, coral/algae, and predator/prey relationships); biodiversity values (significant and threatened species); human uses and values (especially fisheries); major issues (especially coral bleaching, terrestrial run-off, and effects of fishing); and environmental management and sustainable use of reef resources.


MS307          Fish & Fisheries Biology                                              


Prerequisites: MS202 or BI202 and BI206

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course focuses on marine fish biology, population dynamics and fisheries management. Topics for the fish biology component include fish taxonomy, anatomy, behavior and ecology. Topics for the fisheries biology component include an overview of fishing gears, methods, collection of fish samples and data, basic stock assessment and population dynamics. Fisheries management with special emphasis to the context to Pacific Island Countries is also covered. The Pacific tuna fishery is also studied. Practical is a major component of this course and includes laboratory and field work.


MS308          Environmental & Marine Microbiology                            


Prerequisites: BI102 or BI108 and one 200 Level MS and one 200 Level BI course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

Equivalent to BI308. This course gives advanced consideration to the full range of micro-organisms that occur in the seas. Particular emphasis will be given to their structural, physiological and behavioural adaptations to the marine environment. Major aspects of the roles of microbes in the seas to be considered will be their interactions with other microbes and with higher organisms, marine microbial ecology, and the importance of microbes to the productivity of the seas and their contribution to the marine biomass.


MS309          Sustainable Fisheries                                                   


Prerequisites:  MS200 or MS205 or MS210 or MS202 or MS211 or MS213 or MS204 or MS206.

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The course underlines the critical issues affecting management and planning in the fisheries sector and provides tools and techniques to address them. It elaborates on the concept of sustainable fisheries to identify the key factors that need to be addressed as part of planning and policy on fisheries management. Students acquire analytical skills in project formulation, assessment and management as a means to achieve sustainable fisheries by using project planning tools such as cost-benefit analysis. Resource and environmental economic concepts are also used to incorporate the salient features of Pacific Island environments fisheries to mainstream the critical role of the sector in the island economies. Socio-economic survey techniques and resource assessment methods further improve the students’ ability to gather more systematic and accurate data to strengthen decision making and policy development.


MS310          Ports & Shipping                                                           


Prerequisites: MS210 or MS206 or MS200 or MS205 or industry level qualifications and/or work experience in Ports & Shipping (approval of Head of School or nominee).

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L

Marine Transport is the lifeline of Pacific Island Countries, essential at almost all levels of society from village transport and artisanal fishing to the intra-regional and international trade of nation states. It is also arguably the greatest technological heritage legacy of Pacific peoples. This course builds on groundwork covered in MS101 and MS210 and examines the roles of ports, shipping lines and government subsidisation schemes. A case study approach is adopted and students will be expected to adopt the same approach in course work. This course is essential for students intending to pursue further study in this field at postgraduate level.


MS312          Marine Pollution                                                           


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level science course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an introduction to the basic science of pollution in the sea. Lectures will cover the principles of assessment and control with particular reference to tropical systems. Classes will also consider case histories from the tropical Pacific and elsewhere. The case histories will be examined as predictors of various types of environmental risk, for example oil spills, sanitary sewage disposal, factory wastes, radioactivity, etc. Students will participate in practical assignments to develop skills in pollution assessment.


MS313          Seafood Science                                                            


Prerequisites: CH201 or MS204

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course introduces students to the concept of fish and other marine organisms as food. The scientific and technological aspects of seafood spoilage, poisoning, handling, processing and preservation methods (both traditional and more technically advanced) and quality assurance are examined. Students do a major Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) project.


MS314          Tuna Fisheries of the South Pacific                          


Prerequisites:MS200 or MS205 or MS210 or MS202 or MS211 or MS213 or MS204 or MS206, or regional tuna fisheries training and/or fisheries work experience (approval of Head of School or nominee).

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The tuna fisheries of the Pacific Islands are vital to the social, economic and political well- being of many Pacific Island Countries. Tuna fisheries production from the Pacific Islands contribute 80% to total Pacific Ocean tuna production and 60% to total global tuna production, with an annual value of US$3-5 billion. Given the importance of these fisheries, this course will endeavour to develop appropriate knowledge, understanding and skills that would contribute to the sustainable development and management of tuna fisheries in the Pacific Islands. The course will review the biology of targeted tuna species and their implications for tuna development, management and conservation; assessment of tuna stock and fisheries using appropriate tools and models; impacts of climate change and fisheries on tuna stocks and marine environment; current and proposed management and conservation strategies to ensure sustainable development of tuna fisheries and resources; environmental issues associated with tuna fisheries; and tuna economics and trades.


MS315          Marine Spatial Planning                                             


Prerequisites: MS202 or MS211 or MS213 or MS204 or MS206 or MS200 or MS205 or MS210 or GS201 or GS211

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L

This course introduces students to the principles and practice of planning for sustainable marine and coastal management, particularly in the Pacific context. The course aims to provide a good understanding of the policy and regulatory framework, and tools for planning and management. It considers the ways that planning can prepare and manage for change to ensure sustainable futures and specifically, the need to promote balance between social and economic development and the protection of the marine and coastal environment. It identifies, synthesises and analyses the multifarious roles of humans, extreme events and climate change. Case studies from the Pacific region and around the world will be used to illustrate the importance of planning in managing the multiple, often conflicting activities in the marine and coastal zones.


MS324          Aquaculture in Pacific Island Countries                 


Prerequisites: Any 200 Level BI or MS course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an introduction to the present-day status of aquaculture in the world and in Pacific Island countries, and provides information and necessary skills that will help students to recognise aquaculture development constraints and plan development strategies to implement regionally-appropriate and sustainable aquaculture projects. The course involves lectures on theory, practical exercises in the laboratory, and excursions to various aquaculture operations.


MS411          Special Topic in Marine Science                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is suitable for students who want to do marine science studies at the postgraduate level. Students are required to do an independent research project which includes a major report and a seminar. Students may take an intensive course on a special topic (e.g. physical oceanography, coral reef survey techniques, marine biodiversity, community-based natural resources management. Before registering for this course, candidates must first seek out a supervisor, obtain their agreement to provide supervision, and be assigned a research topic.


MS425          Aquaculture                                                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is designed to enable students acquire practical experience and research skills in the development, advancement and management of aquaculture in the Pacific region. Students will identify a short and suitable aquaculture research project; write a concept note and plan including aims and objectives; write a complete research proposal; conduct the research; analyse data; write a publishable quality scientific paper and present a seminar; all of which will be assessed. Assessment may include other assignments. Student will be guided by the course coordinator or appropriate supervisors. Research topics will be approved and assessed by the course coordinator and project supervisors.


MS441          Regional Management of Marine Resources


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course will provide an opportunity to focus on aspects of regional management of marine resources in the South Pacific in line with the special interests of individual candidates. Emphasis will be on the work carried out by relevant regional organisations such as the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA), Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) and the South Pacific Applied Geoscience Commission (SOPAC).


MS442          Statutory Management of Marine Resources


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will give students an opportunity to examine critically the laws and regulations by which individual South Pacific countries manage their marine resources. The legal measures in the form of treaties, conventions and agreements, etc., by which South Pacific countries jointly develop/manage their marine resources will also be examined in depth. In addition to these, other postgraduate courses may be selected from offerings at USP, depending on the area of research and interest. This is a supervised reading course on demand.

MS600F        Marine Science SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                 

MS600P        Marine Science SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                

MS700F        Marine Science Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                           

MS700P        Marine Science Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                         

MS750F        Marine Science DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                

MS750P        Marine Science DRP (Part-Time)                                                                               

MS800F        Marine Science PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                   

MS800P        Marine Science PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                  

PUH100        Human Biology                                                               

Prerequisites: Senate recognised Year 13/Form 7 equivalent exam or any science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the structure of the human body at the cell, tissue, organ and system levels. The structure and function of the human nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems will also be examined as they relate to health and disease.


PUH101        Introduction to Public & Global Health                 


Prerequisites: Senate recognised Year 13/Form 7 equivalent exam or any science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces core topics and pertinent issues in global health with a focus on developed and developing countries. It introduces key global health concepts and underscores the critical links between health, disease, and socio-economic development. Utilising a multidisciplinary approach, the course addresses a variety of contemporary global health topics including: essentials of global health; globalization and health; global burden of disease, measurement, and trends; culture, behavior and global health; water, sanitation and global health; health and human rights; global health partnerships, and the sustainable development goals. The course also examines challenges associated with global health issues and the global efforts and strategies underway to prevent and control them.


PUH102        Microbiology & Parasitology                                    


Prerequisites: Senate recognised Year 13/Form 7 equivalent exam or any science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the classification, structure and life cycle of pathogens that infect humans. Students will develop knowledge of bacterial, viral and other pathogens and their relevance to disease and public health, and the principles of prevention and treatment as they relate to infections in humans.


PUH103        Introduction to Environmental & Occupational Health           


Prerequisites: Senate recognised Year 13/Form 7 equivalent exam or any science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course presents concepts, principles, and applications forming the basis of the field of environmental and occupational health, and discusses the major environmental agents and vectors affecting public health. Presents the major concepts and principles that are environmentally mediated and constitute a risk to humans, emphasising the chemical, biological, and physical agents and factors. Also discusses sources, environmental pathways of transmission, exposure-dose relationships, adverse health effects, and particularly susceptible populations. Identifies the principles and methods of risk assessment and risk management.


PUH104        Introduction to Healthcare: Policy, Planning & Management


Prerequisites: Senate recognised Year 13/Form 7 equivalent exam or any science course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides students with an introduction to the concepts and issues related to health care funding, services delivery, and the structure of health care systems. The focus will be on the Pacific health care system with reference to other health systems as points of comparison. Students will gain familiarity with health care terminology. Explores divergent perspectives for analysing health and health care: clinical, epidemiological, economic, sociological/cultural and public health.


SC356            Research Skills                                                               


Prerequisites: Completion of eight 200 level courses

Semester 1: B at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

The first part of the course will provide students with an overview of the research processes. Experimental design, sampling, data collection and analysis will be introduced. Students will be trained on how to search and organise the literature using internal and external databases. Students will be exposed to the ethical issues associated with scientific research. The students will also develop a project outline selecting appropriate research designs and objectives and hypotheses. The second part of the course will focus on a seven-week supervised research project with appropriate reporting from the students.