School of Business and Management (SBM)

Course Descriptions

Note: UU100 and UU114 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements, before students progress to the 200-level courses. UU200 and UU204 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements, before students progress to the 300-level courses. Only approved programmes may be exempt from this requirement.

 


DBA700        Crafting Research


Prerequisites: Admission to Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This course provides an overview of the research process and the nature of advanced management research and helps to build the foundation for engaging in quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods research. The main learning tools of this course will be the critiquing of scholarly work. Students will be encouraged to explore research philosophical foundations of management and business research located in a Pacific context. Students will explore the link between research questions and advances to management and business theory as well as professional knowledge; deductive, abductive and inductive research designs; and the roles of qualitative and quantitative research approaches.


DBA710        Qualitative Research Methods


Prerequisites: DB 700

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This course covers the theoretical and philosophical bases of qualitative inquiry and provides students with the basic skills needed to do qualitative research. Topics covered in the course include qualitative research approaches such as grounded theory, case-based research, action research, qualitative research designs, and methods of data collection. Issues of validity and reliability, and qualitative data analysis will also be covered.

The course will also evaluate the extent to which management research results are being translated into management in practice.


DBA720        Quantitative Research Methods


Prerequisites: DB701

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This is the final course students take in their Graduate Certificate in Business Research. This course covers the process and practice of research with an emphasis on quantitative research orientations and issues related to design in the management research context. The course covers such topics as: types of research, quantitative research orientations, research ethics, measurement, sampling, and quantitative designs.

Students should be very familiar with statistical analysis software now, and should be further able to recommend new methods based on additional statistical procedures discussed- during this course.


DBA760        Literature Review


Prerequisites: DBA700

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This course requires students to prepare a critical review of the literature that summarises the major research issues and their contributions and identifies a suitable research problem and associated research questions. The course prepares students for their research project through developing a framework for the thesis based on relevant literature.


DBA770        Building Theory


Prerequisites: DBA700 and DBA760

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This course requires students to construct a theoretical framework which is appropriate for addressing a research question. The course synthesizes theoretical, logical and empirical arguments within the context of an inductive, abductive or deductive research design. The course prepares students for their research project through developing a theoretical framework for the thesis based on extant theoretical and empirical literature.


DBA780        Research Proposal


Prerequisites: DBA700, DBA710, DBA720, DBA760, DBA770

Trimester 1: Not offered                                       Trimester 2: Not offered                        Trimester 3: Not offered

This course prepares students to link the components that make up a DBA thesis research proposal. The course provides guidance for coherently connecting a managerial problem statement, a review of relevant literature, a research question, a research design, a theoretical framework, a research approach and implications for theory and practice in management and business. This course enhances competency in the research process by having students develop a preliminary research proposal and an ethics application.


LM112           Principles & Problems in Land Tenure


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course will provide a broad foundation for future study in land management and development. Students will absorb critical knowledge about land terminology, principles and practices. The course will allow students to compare their own experiences in land issues with those in other countries and in other times, exploring a range of solutions to land tenure problems. The course is intended to provide students with an opportunity to develop critical thinking on a range of issues affecting sustainable land management and development in the Pacific Region.


LM113           Introduction to Geomatics                                        


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will introduce students to the role of GIS in land resource management together with appropriate computation and data management using modern computer technology. The purpose and use of cadastral survey techniques including aerial photography interpretation will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to the potential use of satellite technology such as GPS, remote sensing and satellite imagery. The role of mapping in land management and development will be examined.


LM211           Property Investment Analysis                                  


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

The course introduces the physical, legal and financial aspects of property (residential, industrial, commercial, rural, etc.). It leads to a better understanding of individual decision making (house purchase or rental) and to investment decisions based on modern financial analysis. The course also introduces to the Investment approach to property valuation.


LM213           Land & Building Economics                                       


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

The course is presenting the major concepts in urban and building economics. Urban economic concepts will be mostly related to location theory and analysis. Building economics concepts are related to life cycle costing, cost and benefit ratio analysis, and control of cost and depreciation. Cost estimating, including determination of material, labour, equipment, overhead, profit, and other construction costs. Special attention will be given to Pacific Islands specific residential and non-residential modes of construction, maintenance and costing (formal and informal).


LM214           Property Management                                               


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

The course is designed to provide students with a firm understanding of the knowledge, procedures and skills required in the management and brokerage of real property assets. Aspects of property management covered include financial management, maintenance management, budgeting and forecasting, rental collection, arrears management, operational and capital expenditure allocation, leasing and administration, health & safety regulations, marketing, tenant relations, risk management, environmental issues, sustainability, ethical conduct and professional integrity. Students will also be introduced to basic brokerage concepts including Sales & Purchase agreements, transfer dealings and legalities surrounding brokerage of real property assets.


LM215           Town & Country Planning                                          


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is intended to provide a basic understanding of the activities that determine environments, the inter-relationships between these activities, planning theories and principles, and planning processes with particular reference to developing countries. The course attempts to integrate three fields of study: (a) physical, economic and social environments and activities; (b) planning theories, methods and principles, and planning processes and practices; and, (c) consideration of the compensation/ betterment problem.


LM216           Planning & Environmental Law


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C

The course looks closely at the Planning Law in USP member countries and land use controls. In addition, the environmental laws governing planning activities will be introduced to students. Covenants restricting land use and easements relating to land will be discussed.


LM311           Property Valuation Methodology                           


Prerequisites: LM211

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is built on the practical and theoretical knowledge taught in 100 and 200 level courses. It concentrates on international theory and practices to value a property for market valuation purposes. Students will be introduced to the principle terms, legislation and approaches in property valuation. A key component of this course is to introduce students to the reporting standards required in a valuation report as per the International Valuation Standards (IVS). Having various practical components, it largely deals with the different approaches to property valuation namely the Market, Cost and Income approaches. On successful completion of this course, students should be able to compile a market valuation report for a residential property that conforms to the IVS.


LM312           Property Development                                               


Prerequisites: LM211

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

The principal objective of land management is the allocation of scarce resources with respect to and, whether they are physical resources, legal interests, commercial gain, equitable rights, cultural traditions, or other. In an evolving economy the land management (or property) profession plays a critical role in advising relevant parties to achieve their respective goals within the development process. These goals are often either short-term and long-term financial goals, or strategic goals such as undertaking developments for housing, public infrastructure, commercial, industrial and retail purposes. This course requires students to apply Town and Country Planning regulations to a proposed development and undertake a Feasibility study to ascertain the profitability of the project to stakeholders.


LM313           Applied Valuation                                                         


Prerequisites: LM112, LM211 and any one of LM213, LM214 or LM216.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

This course builds on the Valuation methodologies taught in LM 311. The course is designed to teach students the application of Valuation methodologies to undertake valuations for insurance purposes, large commercial developments, rural valuations, subdivisions and compulsory acquisitions. The goal is to provide students with the skills needed to carry out valuation exercises in these fields in light of the applicability of different Valuation methodologies, information sources, ethical practices expected of a property professional and citing reporting guidelines delineated in the International Valuations Standards.


LM315           Land Management Synthetic Project                     


Prerequisites: LM112 and any three 200-level LM courses.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C

The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to carry out a major synthetic project in the general area of land development, planning and management. The course is based on a studio formula and it should bring together all the different components of the land management programme.


LM317           Land Law                                                                          


Prerequisites: LM112

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

The course introduces the students to the general principles of land and real estate law. Topics to be covered will include ownership interests, land titling and registration, law of mortgages and real estate financing, leases and licenses and landlord and tenant rights and duties.


LM318           Industry Internship


Prerequisites: LM211, LM213, LM215 or LM216, LM311 or LM312

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

This course is a two-week block course introduction to industry workplace expectations, followed by a 200 hour industry internship placement, which will give final year students a practical introduction to the vocational environment. The block course will provide professional skills, such as writing a CV and preparing for an interview, it will flesh out the USP generic courses by drawing on experiences of staff and stakeholders, on private and public sector employment issues. The 200-hour internship will allow students to experience the workplace before taking up full time employment and will allow students and prospective employers to establish post-graduation employment opportunities.


LM401           Land Economics                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to bring students to a comprehension of the economics of urban land and to an understanding of the economically rooted problems of cities and the development of remedies. The topics covered include the essential characteristics of land as a natural resource and as a universal economic good, the evolutionary and functional nature of human settlement as a prime land use from which are derived special qualities of productivity and to understand and appreciate certain unique features of urban land economics as an organised discipline.


LM402           Property Investment & Development Analysis


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will examine methods of investment appraisal and their comparison, the cost of sources of capital, project analysis, risk analysis and optimal financing. The study of project evaluation will cover the theory of property pricing, investment analysis and property portfolio performance with particular reference to the problems of measuring performance in the region. Market research and the effects of fiscal policy on property investment and development will be discussed. Decision and benefit cost analysis together with traditional valuation methods will be considered in relation to project appraisal.


LM420           Special Topic in Land Management


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L      Semester 2: Not offered

This course is a generic course designed to further develop the research and analytical skills of postgraduate students within the School of Land Management and Development. The course provides a graduate level introduction to the research writing process, grounded specifically on the types of research methodology that is relevant in the property sphere. In addition, the course introduces the use of statistical analytical tools such as linear regressions, ANOVA and further explores the application of these quantitative statistical methods in the discipline of property/real estate. In addition, the course provides an advanced level understanding of the framework for successfully conducting a fully-fledged applied market study for each of the key real estate property sectors – housing, commercial (office), retail and resort and leisure.

LM600F         Land Management SRP (Full-Time)

LM600P        Land Management SRP (Part-Time)

LM700F         Land Management Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)

LM700P        Land Management Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)

LM750F         Land Management DRP (Full- Time)

LM750P        Land Management DRP (Part- Time)

LM800F         Land Management PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

LM800P        Land Management PhD Thesis (Part-time)


MBA421       Entrepreneurship & Innovation                      


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: F at L

This course explores the entrepreneurial process through which new business ventures are created. Case studies are used with an interactive discussion-based teaching approach, supplemented with presentations by local and regional entrepreneurs. Students learn how to write a complete business plan and present it to the class.


MBA422       Financial Institutions & Markets                             


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

Financial markets facilitate allocation of financial resources to productive activities for the benefit of society. Financial institutions provide the institutional framework for markets by performing essential intermediation and distribution functions. The main objectives of this course are to enable participants to understand the organisation and methods of financial markets, such as money markets and capital markets, as well as the various institutions and instruments constituting these markets.


MBA423       Human Resource Management


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                            Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: F at L

The effective management of people has an important bearing on organisational success. The importance of personnel policies and procedures has created opportunities for managers and administrators with expertise in this field. The course provides conceptual and practical skills in areas such as the strategic aspects of human resource management, people-power planning, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, training and development, salary administration and employee benefits. Industrial relations in the context of the South Pacific region is an important theme.


MBA425       Independent Study                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

The independent study course will require the student to negotiate a learning contract with a lecturer or researching in an area relevant to the student`s interest. A programme of readings, activities, research and assessments will be prepared for review by the Head of School at course commencement.


MBA430       Special Topic in Business Administration


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                            Trimester 2: F at L                            Trimester 3: F at L

This course is designed to provide access to important topics which may not fit well into the confines of the traditional trimester-length course format. Some such topics represent recent breakthroughs in knowledge; they will be taught by USP and distinguished visiting staff from overseas.


MBA431       Quantitative Business Analysis                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                            Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

Quantitative Business Analysis provides the student with a basic understanding of statistical concepts and their application to the business environment. The emphasis is on inferential statistics. However, the approach is applied with numerous examples from business. Students learn hypothesis testing and use statistical methods such as one-sample and two-sample tests for means and proportions, chi-square, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression analysis.


MBA432       Accounting for Decision-making               


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                            Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course develops the basic concepts and procedures underlying financial statements and introduces tools for analysing profitability, risk and other financial considerations underlying business decision-making. The accounting data inputs into an organisation`s Accounting Information System (AIS) will be evaluated. Such data includes both traditional financial reports and specialist reports prepared by the AIS.


MBA433       Management of Information Systems


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                    Trimester 2: F at L                                    Trimester 3: Not offered

Through the use of a range of software packages, the course examines the manner in which information is used for business-decision making. Methodologies and approaches for making the most effective use of information and information technology are presented and practised. As decision support systems (DSS) are becoming a major management tool, two such systems, knowledge based DSS and expert systems, are evaluated.


MBA434       South Pacific Business Environment


Prerequisites: MBA439

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                 Trimester 3: F at L

The course covers key issues relating to the South Pacific business environment. Corporate social responsibility, regionalism, utilisation of natural resources, impacts of culture on business problems, labour relations, government support for business privatisation and the consequences of foreign investment will be considered. The relationships of business, culture and the natural environment, commercial law, as well as the ethics of various viewpoints and practices constitute major themes.


MBA435       Organisational Behaviour                           


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                            Trimester 2: F at L                            Trimester 3: Not offered

The study of organisational behaviour is concerned with the causes of behaviour and the application of this knowledge to understanding the human aspects of organisational systems and their management. The focus is on individuals, on groups, and on organisations as a whole.


MBA436       Finance                                                              


Prerequisites: MBA432

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: F at L                            Trimester 3: Not offered

The focus of this course is the role of finance, as a function of management, in maximising the value of the firm. Course participants will be expected to acquire the necessary conceptual insights, and analytical skills to perform the finance function in rapidly changing business environments, within and across countries. The course will be designed to strike a balance among three interrelated areas, viz., macro finance, investments, focusing on decision-making for choosing securities for the portfolio; and managerial or business finance, involving the management of the finance function at the level of a firm. Thus, the course will cover such topics as the essential concepts in finance, financial analysis, working capital management, short-term financing decisions and strategic long-term financing decisions including mergers, divestitures and leveraged buy-out.


MBA437       Marketing                                                         


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: F at L                            Trimester 3: F at L

Principles of marketing are discussed with reference to South Pacific products and services. Topics include: the role of marketing in the organisation and society; the marketing environment; customer markets and buyer behaviour; marketing research; market segmentation and positioning; the marketing-mix; product life cycle; marketing planning and implementation; and the ethical consequences of marketing actions. The marketing function is regarded as a key ingredient in management and strategic planning. Continuous reference is made to both the domestic and international marketplace.


MBA438       Operations & Quality Management


Prerequisites: MBA431

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: F at L                           Trimester 3: Not offered

While operations management originally developed in manufacturing organisation, theory and method have been expanded to cover operations in service organisations. Key business functions include product design, resource allocation, location and layout of facilities, scheduling activities, materials and inventory management, process integration, technology selection, capacity planning and work force improvement. Quality management and the philosophy underlying this commitment receive particular emphasis.


MBA439       Business Economics                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: F at L                                           Trimester 2: Not offered                 Trimester 3: F at L

This course provides an overview of the main principles, theories and techniques of economics and their relevance to the management of enterprises in market economies. It includes a review of the fundamentals of business economics, how markets work in a free enterprise economy, the role of governments in regulating and managing the economy, the economics of government/business/consumer relations, the economics of firms and industries, enterprise economics and economic techniques to assist management decision-making including the basics of cost-benefit analysis. The course also introduces students to the study of financial markets and the role of stock exchanges and the different equity and borrowing sources of funds for firms.


MBA440       Strategic Management                                


Prerequisites: MBA431, MBA432, MBA433, MBA435, MBA437, MBA438, MBA439

Trimester 1: Not offered                                Trimester 2: Not offered                 Trimester 3: F at L

This course commences with a review of the available models in strategic management. Then students choose a specific organisation in the Pacific Region and analyse each and every step of the strategic management process of the organisation on a group basis under the guidance of the concerned faculty member. Students will analyse the political, economic, social, and technological environments in the Region and their impact. They will examine the direction of the organisation, its vision and mission, goals and objective in the context, organisational strengths and weaknesses and the changing external environment. They will critically examine the past, present and possible future strategies, at corporate as well as at different functional levels, and evaluate their effectiveness. Then they will cross-examine the structure of the organisation to ensure successful implementation of the planned strategies to achieve the set objectives. In-depth analysis of the live case and stage-wise presentation for continuous improvement are the hall marks of this course.


MBA441       International Marketing                              


Prerequisites: MBA437

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

While drawing on the basic knowledge acquired by students through MBA437, this course examines major issues related to analysing international markets and developing international marketing strategies. The focus is hands-on learning of how companies interested in entering the global marketplace: (a) analyse, identify and assess marketing opportunities abroad, (b) decide whether to go international, (c) decide which particular market, (d) decide how to enter the chosen market(s), (e) develop a marketing programme for the target market(s), and design an effective organisational structure and control system for successful implementation of the international marketing programme. Course material is applicable to the whole spectrum of firms` situations – from the beginning internationalists through to multinational corporations.


MBA442       Services Marketing & Management


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course is for MBA students interested in a senior management career in the services sector. It integrates many different functions of management (operations, marketing, HRM and strategic planning) with an orientation towards practical application. The course will be service business case and practical exercise oriented with strong emphasis on application of theory and principles to real life situations. It will combine group work with individual work and provide an opportunity to analyse and study local organisations, with a view to improving the quality of service provided. This course should be appropriate for people in almost any sector of the economy: private, public or not-for-profit. Quality service should be integral to virtually any successful commercial, governmental or charitable organisation.


MBA443       E-Marketing for Managers                                                                


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Trimester 1: Not offered                                 Trimester 2: Not offered                Trimester 3: Not offered

This course will review and evaluate e-business and e-marketing theory and practice. Students will apply the theory through the development of a website for the prime purpose of marketing a product or service or idea online. Although students are not expected to have background in website creation, the final outcome is contingent upon the technical skills each student will acquire and bring to their team project of building an E-commerce website. The student will learn the basic technical skills necessary to design and create a website.


MG101          Introduction to Management                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into the Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course aims to help students understand important management concepts and theories, covering the basic management functions and other important issues from a practical perspective. It provides a comprehensive and integrated introduction to the process of management in both functional and behavioural aspects. In particular, the course targets the development of human skills, personal, interpersonal and group skills by using a wide range of teaching methods that encourage student participation during tutorials. It is therefore imperative for students to read the prescribed text and other relevant materials from the library and the internet, in order to be able to participate effectively.


MG106          Introduction to Human Resource Management


Prerequisites: Admission into the Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

This course introduces students to the basic concepts of human resource management, employment relations, the emerging HRM trends as well as management of human resources in the public sector. It is important to remember that there is no single right way to manage people. As such, the major aim of this course is to stimulate students to think about vital issues relating to human resource management and how it should be organised at workplace. The topics covered in this course are organised around four themes: the human resource management and environment, acquiring and preparing human resources, developing employees, and compensating and managing human resources. All these issues will be examined in the context of global changes taking place in the field of human resource management and the impact of such changes on the public and private sectors in the South Pacific Region.


MG201          Organisational Behaviour                                          


Prerequisites: MG101 or MG106

Semester 1: P at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

MG201 introduces fundamental concepts in the field of organisational behaviour (OB). Managers worldwide fully appreciate the significance of OB and how, as a field of study, it assists them in dealing with the challenges facing 21st century organisations through a solid understanding of human behaviour at work-both of self and others. It is also true that OB is a very interesting and relevant subject because almost all of us are interested in human behaviour and expect to work in some organisation at least part of our adult lives. Organisations fail or succeed, decline or prosper because of people, i.e. because of what people do or do not do every day on the job. Therefore, OB is concerned with the study of what people do in an organisation and how that behaviour affects the performance of the organisation. It is now also recognised that effective organisational behaviour is the foundation, and the effective management and leadership of organisations requires thoughtful application of competencies related to the behaviour of people at work.


MG202          Operations Management                                           


Prerequisites: MG101 or MG106

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

This course is intended to introduce students to the field of Operations Management (OM) and create an appreciation of the significance of OM decisions. Some of these decision areas include workforce, process, capacity, quality and inventory. Students will learn to examine the effectiveness of operations systems in both manufacturing and services, identify operations problems and propose solutions for improvements.


MG204          Management of Employment Relations                                       


Prerequisites: MG101 or MG106

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

At the core of employment relations are different views on how to manage relationships between an organisation, its employees and their representatives as well as parallel arguments on how governments should frame laws and policies to best encourage efficient and equitable employment relations within organisations. Thus, this course provides students with a robust introduction to the study and operation of employment relations. It is designed to provide students with a body of knowledge on employment relations theory, an understanding of the relationships between the major actors in an employment relations system, processes and outcomes.


MG206          Marketing Principles & Strategies                          


Prerequisites: MG101 or MG106

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

This course is an in depth survey of the principles of marketing. The course is based on an understanding of the importance of marketing to the success of any business endeavour. While strategy and planning considerations are covered, the emphasis is on buyer behaviour and the use of the marketing mix to reach that buyer successfully. Students will receive a working understanding of the concepts and procedures of marketing in today’s environment, and its inter-relationship with other business functions. Students whose primary interests lie in other fields will go away with the foundation to understand how marketing relates to their primary area of interest.


MG214          Principles of Public Sector Management              


Prerequisites: MG101 or MG106

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

 This course familiarizes students with key theories, concepts and areas underpinning public sector management and the role of government, while discussing topics like public policy making, strategic management, human resource management, accountability, and the more recent digital governance. The course focuses on the Traditional Public Administration and New Public Management (NPM) models, exploring how NPM gained prominence and how both models have influenced the design and implementation of various management systems and practices in the public sector. The course critically engages with the relevance of these concepts, models and changes in relation to the contexts of Pacific Island Countries and Territories


MG301          Management of Service Operations                      


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

This course explores the strategic, operational, marketing and financial issues related to the provision of a service that leads to a high level of customer satisfaction. It examines the ways by which human resources can be managed effectively to achieve this. The methodologies available for measuring, analysing and designing service systems are evaluated, along with the role that marketing has in attracting customers and shaping their expectations. The financial implications of providing a quality service are examined.


MG302          Human Resource Management                               


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: P at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course introduces the functional area of human resource management. It focuses on employer/employee strategies, policies and techniques. Topics cover the role of human resource function, employee planning and forecasting, recruitment and selection, employee development and employer employee relations, human resources information systems, performance management, career planning and development, compensation and benefits, employee health and safety, international human resource management and other important aspects in this field. Students are expected to gain broad knowledge of the theory and practice of human resource management. Emphasis is given to the acquisition of skills that have direct application to any sector, public, private or voluntary.


MG303          International Marketing                                             


Prerequisites: MG206 and any one 200 Level MG course or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The course introduces the multiple dimensions, environments, and strategies of international marketing. General topics include the changing character of the world economy, the globalisation of markets, regional regulatory agencies, the international financial system, and the variable impacts of politics and culture on contracts and trade agreements. Strategic topics include foreign market assessment, foreign market entry, responding to competition, product modification, pricing decisions, channel selection, and cross-cultural promotion. Case studies and the preparation of a product/service export plan integrate the general understanding with concrete and practical experience.


MG305          New Venture Creation                                                


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course, which explores the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed to create and manage new ventures, focuses on finding and developing opportunities for promising new enterprises with growth potential. It will also focus on the design and management of enterprise support services for nurturing new and existing businesses. Key objectives are to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to assess their own potential as entrepreneurs; assess the viability of new venture opportunities; and, prepare a detailed business plan (or project proposal).


MG309          Strategic Management                                               


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: P at C

The subject of Strategic Management primarily deals with the problems and processes of appropriately matching an organisation with its environment. It offers knowledge and tools for manoeuvring the environment for the strategic advantage of the organisation. Given such background this course intends to impart basic knowledge and skills in formulating, implementing and evaluating business strategies in the existing or potentially emergent environmental context. The overall objective of this course is to enable students to identify the problems confronting an organisation and make appropriate strategic decisions for improving its overall performance in order to enable the organisation to survive and compete in the global environment.


MG311          Total Quality Management                                       


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The importance of quality in managerial decision-making, especially in an increasingly competitive global environment, cannot be overemphasised. In this course we will examine quality problems from the perspective of the modern day manager in both public and private sector organisations. The main part of the course introduces the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM). Both the managerial and the statistical aspects of quality will be covered.


MG312          Organisation Development                                       


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: O at C

Organisation development is a planned change process to meet individual and organisational needs using behavioural and organisational science theories and techniques. The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and tools to help organisations develop a vision, to conduct a diagnosis of individual, team, and organisational problems, to make an intervention plan, and to evaluate an intervention. In order to meet this objective we will explore the nature of the planned change process and we will have an in-depth look at behavioural and organisational theories and techniques which can be used to stimulate individual, group and organisational development.


MG315          Employment Relations Theory & Policy                                        


Prerequisites: Any 2×200 level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 level TS course

Semester 1: P at C                                                           Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course examines the relationship between theory research and policy as operative in the field of HRM and employment relations. Further analysis of the policy dimension focuses on structure, processes and technical aspects of the development, implementation and evaluation of employment relations policy by unions, employer organisations, corporations and government. Specific attention is paid to practice in the Pacific region, but this is put in the comparative context of international best practice.


MG316          Comparative Employment Relations                     


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: P at C                                                           Semester 2: P at C

This course will provide a background and review of issues and themes in employment relations. It will explore the role, aims, history, and goals of unions, employer organisations and governments in the field of employment relations. The materials will be drawn from around the world, but special attention will be given to issues and developments of relevance in the South Pacific.


MG318          Managing Change in the Public Service                 


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

MG318 is about managing changes in the public sector and in particular its core component, which is largely known as the public service. It begins with an analysis of key theories in the literature of change management and proceeds to conduct an in-depth examination of the details of each stage of the process of change management, including: the need for change and the roles of change actors, strategies for change, approving changes and political and stakeholder feasibility, implementing change and overcoming resistance, evaluating change and taking corrective action, sustaining change through capacity building and leadership. In essence this course implicitly provides a practical dimension to the conceptual framework of change management by examining the changes that are integral to public sector reforms undertaken by several countries in the region recently that largely drew on the New Public Management (NPM) model.


MG319          Ethics and Professionalism in Public Service


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 level TS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides a balanced approach to the study of ethics and professionalism in the Public Service by initially discussing key traditional and contemporary theoretical insights on ethics and professionalism. This is followed by an in-depth discussion of ethical responsibilities of public managers, tools for ethical behaviour, ethical decision making and how to build an ethical and professional organisation. In essence, the course provides discussions on issues central to ethics like corruption, accountability and transparency in relation to the Pacific region.


MG321          International Business                                                


Prerequisites: Any two 200 Level MG courses or TS207 and one 200 Level TS course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course provides a broad introduction to international business in the contemporary world. Accordingly, the course covers a wide range of material touching on the international environment and on the operational issues encountered by firms doing business within that environment. It will seek to integrate and expand on the principles learned in core courses throughout the BCom programme. It will also focus on ethical issues in the international environment, seeking to show students how Multi National Corporation (MNC) actions impact on the rest of the world. Key objectives of this course are to equip with a systematic understanding of the fundamental aspects of the global business environment that influence business decisions and also have an advanced understanding of the different theories of international business.


MG401          Employment Relations                                                


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is intended for graduates with an interest in the management of HRM and employment relations. This course will be useful to those who wish to know about human resource management and employment relations. Issues globally and from the South Pacific region will be examined.


MG402          Employment Relations Dispute Resolution Systems


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is about resolution of conflicts, grievances and employment disputes at the organisation level as well as via Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) system such as conciliation, mediation and arbitration. The focus will be ADR globally and in the Pacific.


MG403          Management Development in Small Business   


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

Small businesses have become an engine of growth in the modern economy. Small business management practices differ based on differences in the management practices adopted by managers across different geographical regions. This course will provide insights to students on the need to develop sound managerial skills of employees so that these businesses can compete in heavily concentrated markets. Further, it will help students to think critically about existing small business management practices used by managers in different geographical settings, with a focus on the Pacific Island Countries and comparing it with best small business management practices globally. Finally, in light of the current global, economic and technological developments, this course is intended to prepare existing and future small business managers to deal with potential uncertainties in managing small businesses in their local context.


MG404          Human Behaviour in the Context of Work & Organisations


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course analyses the determinants, consequences and implications of human behaviour within organisations, examining in particular the place of the individual in the workplace, interpersonal relations, group structures and processes, inter-group relations and the impact of technology and organisation structures. The emphasis at the 400-level will be on understanding conceptual frameworks that attempt to integrate the distinct components of organisational behaviour into a whole entity of interrelated activities. It is hoped that through the process of conceptualisation and concept application in the area of human behaviour in the work place, a greater appreciation of the interrelationships of work behaviour and the work environment will develop in due course.


MG405          Management in the Context of Development


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is crucial for addressing poverty and other development problems. The practice of development management typically involves complex interactions between governmental, nongovernmental organisations, donors, and public members, which can be difficult to navigate. This course explores theoretical and empirical underpinnings of development management, challenges and prospects associated with its practice in developing and transitional countries, including Pacific Island countries. The course covers development management and how it is linked to the attitudes and perceptions of various stakeholders, including government officials, public sector managers, aid workers, donors, and members of the public.


MG406          Special Topic in Management                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This is a special topic course with no specific subject matter. The  course may be offered depending on the availability of staffing and demand by students. The course content will depend on the chosen title from time to time. More details will be available when a course is offered.


MG409          Commercialisation, Corporatisation & Privatisation


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to introduce the concepts associated with deregulation in the region with particular emphasis on commercialisation, corporatisation and privatisation. It will consider the various steps and options in the privatisation process including commercialisation, corporatisation, liquidation, divestiture and the eventual privatisation in Fiji and the rest of the South Pacific region. There are three main phases in this process, the first being commercialisation, which is concerned with making an organisation or operation more commercially oriented but still operated under the government structure. The second phase is corporatisation, which is the creation of a separate entity with its own board of directors and management structure outside the civil service. The government is the sole or majority shareholder. Privatisation, the third phase, is the process of selling majority ownership to the private sector.


MG410          Consumer Behaviour                                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The main objective of this course is to train and prepare students with what they, as a marketer, need to know to understand the role of meeting the consumer`s needs and wants in the development of marketing strategy. This will also make them understand what it means to be a consumers in a market-oriented society. This course is suggested for any business and non-business majors who may at some point of their career find themselves in a marketing related position. One goal of this course is to inform students of what is expected of them upon entering the working world and how to move up within the ranks. Students may expect to leave with a limited set of experiences directly related to customers and a fairly good knowledge of the commonalties shared by all customers.


MG411          Project Management                                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

The course involves the concepts, tools and techniques of project management from its planning to scheduling to implementation to commissioning and finally to reviewing. Each stage will demonstrate the importance of human resources, finance, materials and equipment etc. to complete a project in due time and within allocated budget. Clashing of time and cost will be part of discussion as time – cost trade-off is a very important issue in project management. Due importance will be given to project management information systems, reporting systems and computerisation as they emerge as the latest issues in project management. Features of software packages such as MS Project and Primavera, and how these packages help in controlling and scheduling of complex projects, will be discussed.


MG412          Supply Chain Management                                       


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course covers the concepts, principles and practices of the developing field of supply chain management. This includes the arrangement of information, goods, services, funds and business relationships within and between organisations. Strategic management thinking in supply chain terms has moved away from optimising the purchasing of goods and services to focusing on how a company can manage all aspects of supply activity to create a sustainable competitive advantage. This includes management of information flows; effective inventory policies; alliances and cooperative arrangements; configuration of logistics networks; optimising the transportation cost and the coordination of product and supply chain design. Latest software to help the effective management of supply chain will also be part of the course.


MG413          Decision Making                                                            


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This is a course for anyone faced with the task of managing in this millennium when the impact of globalisation on businesses, both small and large, is challenging the problem solving skills of managers. Today`s business students are learning the latest tools for analysing their specialised fields of study. These techniques and the frantic pace of work have created a dynamic, constantly changing work environment that challenges individuals to adapt continually and learn new methods of accomplishing objectives. But the business landscape painted by the changing workplace does not absolve managers of the need to acquire, practice, and utilise a set of managerial skills as the mantle of leadership and decision-making is passed from one team member to another.


MG451          Governance & Public Sector Management


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B at C*

This course offers relevant concepts and issues on governance, civil society, public sector reform areas, and public management practices and techniques. It also scrutinises ongoing reform processes in Fiji and the South Pacific as well as in the contemporary world to evaluate institutional and systemic reform frameworks from local, regional and global perspectives.


MG452          Advanced Human Resource Management


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This advanced course on HR looks at the current discourse in HRM, International HRM (IHRM) and Strategic International HRM (STHRM). It also looks at how organisations manage employment relations effectively.


MG453          Public Policy & Public Sector Leadership


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines public policy and leadership. It takes an explicitly comparative and historical approach. This includes: (i) an understanding of the processes of public policy; (ii) an understanding of recent developments in public policy; (iii) a look at e-government policy developments across the world; and (iv)understanding decision making in policy.


MG600F        Management SRP (Full-Time)


This course is equivalent to two management postgraduate units.


MG600P       Management SRP (Part-Time)


This course is equivalent to two management postgraduate units.


MG700F        Management Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)


This thesis allows students with ability to undertake original research and interest in a specific area of management to undertake the research and complete the thesis.


MG700P       Management Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)


This thesis allows students with ability to undertake original research and interest in a specific area of management to undertake the research and complete the thesis.


MG750F        Management DRP (Full-Time)


MG750P       Management DRP (Part-Time)


MG800F        Management PhD Thesis (Full-Time)


This thesis allows students with ability to undertake original research and interest in a specific area of management to undertake the research and complete the thesis at a PhD level.


MG800P       Management PhD Thesis (Part-Time)


This thesis allows students with ability to undertake original research and interest in a specific area of management to undertake the research and complete the thesis at a PhD level.


TS106            Introduction to Tourism                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                             Semester 2: P at C

This course introduces students to basic concepts in the study of tourism and provides a framework for an understanding of its nature, characteristics and significance in economies and societies worldwide and in Pacific countries in particular. The course applies an interdisciplinary approach drawing on economics and other social sciences. It provides an integrated view of tourism, both as a self-contained subject and as a background for further study.


TS107            Tourism in the South Pacific                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B and P at C*                                             Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

This course will examine the development of tourism in the South Pacific region, particularly after the Second World War, and up to the present phase of moderate to mass tourism. The aim of this course is to enable students to understand the enormous social and economic pressure faced by South Pacific societies and by their governments and how tourism is seen as a panacea to sustain future economic and social development. The vulnerabilities of the South Pacific countries to the vagaries of the changes in the macro-environment will also be discussed in the tourism context. Additionally the course will examine tourism development plans of national governments and explore the extent to which these plans show (or do not show) attention to social, cultural and environmental impacts of tourism.


TS108            Dimensions of Hospitality                                          


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                             Semester 2: P at C

This course provides students with a liberal and reflective orientation to the study of hospitality. To explain the field of hospitality, the course will draw from a number of disciplines and fields of enquiry. It exposes students to insights into the study of hospitality that encompass both the private and commercial provision of hospitality and the hospitality industry. It orients students to the hospitality industry and management issues that confront it.


TS109            Food and Beverage Services & Cost Control


Prerequisites: TS108 or one of the core 100 level Food and Nutrition Courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

Apart from accommodation, the food and beverage department is a large revenue earner in a hotel. Restaurants, bars, nightclubs and other food service operations are an important sector of the hospitality industry. This course provides students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary for the effective management of food service operations. It presents the basic service principles, which focus on the importance of delivering customer-oriented services that meet or exceed the expectations of guests. It also provides an understanding of food service costs and operating controls and a framework on which to build further studies in food and beverage management. This is an elective course for Food and Nutritional Science students.


TS207            Marketing for Tourism & Hospitality                     


Prerequisites: TS106 or MG101

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                             Semester 2: P at C

An introduction to the marketing of tourism and hospitality goods and services in the South Pacific; identifying target markets and estimating demand; packaging, branding, pricing, promoting, advertising and distribution; consumer and industrial buying behaviour; marketing strategy and planning; marketing research and the marketing environment; implications for society. The course examines how marketing facilitates exchange between individuals or consumers and organisations in order to satisfy the goals of both parties within the tourism and hospitality sector.


TS208            Operational Issues for Hospitality                          


Prerequisites: TS106 or TS108 or MG101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

This course provides students with an integrative and systems orientation approach to the study of hospitality operations management. The course blends technical, professional and personal development using the tools needed for effective performance in the workplace such as Micros Opera and room Master Property Management Systems. It will also develop the knowledge and skills needed for the effective management of the rooms division department of a hotel or resort and will include the following: reservations, guest registration, service quality, cashiering, revenue management, night audit and housekeeping. This course is a recommended elective for double major tourism management and/or management students.


TS209            Food & Beverage Management                               


Prerequisites: TS109

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                             Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on the knowledge gained in first semester courses for the Hotel Management degree. It provides a detailed introduction to the complexities of food and beverage management. It is designed to prepare students to manage aspects of food and beverage operations effectively to improve the profitability and productivity of their operations and to enhance customer satisfaction. It examines different subject areas within the orbit of operational food and beverage management and relates these to the applications applied within the five main sectors of the catering industry: fast food and popular catering, hotels and quality restaurants, function catering, industrial catering and welfare catering.


TS213            International Tourism                                                 


Prerequisites: TS106

Semester 1: B and P at C                                             Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

This course examines international tourism with a view to providing students with knowledge and understanding of the scope and patterns of international tourism demand. It covers contemporary cross-cultural issues in international tourism, dimensions and trends, advanced analysis of tourist behaviour, socio-psychological determinants of tourist motivation and experiences, analysis of tourist-host and tourist-environment interactions. It also examines historic, cultural, economic and tourism characteristics of major international tourism source and destination regions.


TS216            Integrated Industry Learning for Tourism & Hospitality


Prerequisites: TS106 or TS108 and TS207

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

The course is for BComTHM (originally BATH) and BA/BCom Tourism Management/ Tourism Studies) double major and B.Com Hotel Management degree students only. The purpose of this course is to provide students in the BComTHM and BComTM degree programme with the opportunity to undertake individually, under supervision, a tourism or hospitality related placement for a minimum of six weeks. Recommended optional courses for double major Tourism Management students.NB: Recommended optional course for double major Tourism Management students. Due to COVID19 it is unlikely internships will be available at resorts and hotels. Students may be required to backtrack into the B.Com Tourism and Hospitality Management programme or undertake virtual internship assignment


TS218            Rooms Division Practical                                            


Prerequisites: TS208 & TS216

Semester 1: TBA                                                              Semester 2: TBA

This course builds on the knowledge gained in TS208 by providing students with a practical internship in the Rooms Division department of a hotel or resort. It is designed to develop the practical skills needed for the effective management of the rooms’ division department of a hotel or resort, including housekeeping, conferences and events and the use of such property management systems as Micros Opera and room Master. This course is a practical internship and for Certificate, Diploma and BCom Hotel Management students only. NB: Due to the impact of COVID-19 on resorts and hotels internships may not be available in 2022 and students may be required to undertake virtual internship assignments or backtrack into the Bachelor of Commerce Tourism and Hospitality Management.


TS302            Strategic Services Management in Hospitality


Prerequisites: TS207, TS208 or TS213, or two 200 Level MG courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

This advanced course investigates the strategic issues confronting managers operating in the hospitality and tourism industries. It aims to provide students with an integrated approach to exploring the way hospitality businesses are managed and operated. The course evaluates ways in which managers can link profit and growth to loyalty, satisfaction, and value in a range of hospitality business models. NB: Suitable optional courses for MG, IBM and HRM majors.


TS303            Food & Beverage Operations Practical                    


Prerequisites: TS209 and TS216

Semester 1: TBA                                                              Semester 2: TBA

This is a practical internship of six months in a hotel approved by the Student Industry Liaison Co-ordinator and the Course Co-ordinator. The internship entails at least 20 hours a week in the Food and Beverage Department. During this course, students are expected to cover the following areas of the Food and Beverage Department: Main Kitchen, Food and Beverage Administration, Food and Beverage for Conventions and Banquets. This course is a practical internship and for Certificate, Diploma and BCom Hotel Management students only.NB: Due to the impact of COVID-19 on resorts and hotels internships may not be available in 2022 and students may be required to undertake virtual internship assignments or backtrack into the Bachelor of Commerce Tourism and Hospitality Management.


TS304            Front Office & Sales Marketing Practical 


Prerequisites: TS207, TS208 and TS216

Semester 1: TBA                                                              Semester 2: TBA

This is a practical internship of six months in a hotel/resort or organisation approved by the Student Industry Liaison Co-ordinator and the Course Co-ordinator. The internship entails at least 20 hours a week in the Front Office and Sales and Marketing Departments. During this course, students are expected to cover the following areas of the Front Office and Sales and Marketing Departments: Front office-Reception, Reservations, PABX, Finance and Administration, and Sales and Marketing. This course is a practical internship and for Certificate, Diploma and BCom Hotel Management students only.TB: Due to the impact of COVID-19 on resorts and hotels internships may not be available in 2022 and students may be required to undertake virtual internship assignments or backtrack into the Bachelor of Commerce Tourism and Hospitality Management.


TS309            Tourism Business Entrepreneurship                      


Prerequisites: TS207 and TS213

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                                   Semester 2: Not offered

This course is structured to explore the provision of tourist attractions, heritage sites, facilities, and tourism and hospitality services as potential entrepreneurial business activities. The components of the course address entrepreneurial ideas and concepts surrounding the development of a business plan for a resort/hotel or heritage site with accommodation, sustainable strategies (international, regional and local), and planning concepts in the tourism industry. The course incorporates practical applications from different industry sectors including (but not limited to) accommodation, tour operations, and facility management. The topics and projects will be focused on these areas with emphasis on practical industry application in the context of entrepreneurship. Suitable optional course for MG, IBM and HRM majors.


TS310            Tourism in Less Developed Countries                    


Prerequisites: TS213

Semester 1: F at L and B & P at C*                             Semester 2: Not offered

This course applies students` knowledge and understanding of development and organisation of tourism in the developing countries of the world and focuses on the opportunities, problems and issues in tourism in those countries. It covers tourism policies, tourism`s role in economic development, economic, social and environmental contexts in which tourism operates, gender issues in tourism development, educational and training needs in less developed countries, and ethics of tourism development. Tourism is examined worldwide with reference to various less developed countries at different stages of tourism development.


TS311            Sustainable Tourism Development                         


Prerequisites: TS207 and TS213

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and B & P at C*

This course aims to provide students in their third year with an understanding of both theory and practice in sustainable tourism development. The content includes the origins of sustainable concepts with particular focus on planning and managing tourism enterprises. Other areas of the course include ecotourism, visitor impact management, interpretation and education, economics, and marketing. Students will also explore issues concerning socio-cultural and environmental impacts and techniques for mitigating negative results of tourism development. Case studies are incorporated into each topic area for a comprehensive review of sustainable tourism projects in other areas of the world.


TS401            Current Issues in Tourism & Hospitality


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

An advanced study of concepts of tourism and hospitality, providing a framework for the understanding of its structure, nature, characteristics and significance; where students will develop a critical awareness of recent trends both globally and within the Asia/Pacific region. The course applies an interdisciplinary approach drawing on a variety of social science perspectives. The focus is placed on sustainable tourism in an international context and in Pacific countries in particular.


TS402            Advanced Tourism Planning & Development 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The overall aim of the course is to equip students with an understanding of the principles for sustainable tourism development, planning and management, especially in the context of natural areas, based on a comprehensive, co-ordinated and managed approach. The course comprises a critical examination of the interdisciplinary nature of tourism and of contemporary models and methods for tourism planning and development. The need for and scope of, tourism planning is critically reviewed, and the requirements for, and methods of, stakeholder participation in tourism planning are analysed.


TS403            Festival & Event Management                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the key components of the festival, events, meetings, incentive and conventions market. In this course students will develop conceptual and analytical skills in strategic planning as they relate to festival and event management and critically examine how events can be used to achieve strategic goals in destination management, image creation and development.


TS405            Entrepreneurship & Innovation in Tourism & Hospitality


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of small business management, the role of entrepreneurship in the tourism and hospitality industry, and launching new ventures in the tourism, hospitality, events and sport industries, with a focus on the Pacific context. The entrepreneur engages in a number of processes when conceptualising, developing and operating a new business venture. An understanding of these processes is essential to any potential entrepreneur who will be required to search for financial sources for the venture, select a suitable location and plan for the successful operation of the new business. The perspective is both Pacific and international.


TS413            Special Topic in Tourism Studies                             


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The topic of this course will cater for the advanced tourism interests of individual students. Course content will vary dependent on individual circumstances. Please contact the Head of School for further information.


TS600F          Tourism & Hospitality Management SRP (Full-time)

TS600P          Tourism & Hospitality Management SRP (Part-time)

TS700F          Tourism & Hospitality Management Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)

TS700P          Tourism & Hospitality Management Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)

TS750F          Tourism & Hospitality Management DRP (Full-Time)

TS750P          Tourism & Hospitality Management DRP (Part-Time)

TS800F          Tourism & Hospitality Management PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

TS800P          Tourism & Hospitality Management PhD Thesis (Part-Time)