School of Law and Social Sciences (SoLaSS)

Course Descriptions

Note: UU100 and UU114 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 200-level courses. UU200 and UU204 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 300-level courses. Only approved programmes may be exempt from this requirement.

 


COJ01            Introduction to Law                                                       


Prerequisites: Admission into the Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces participants to the various kinds of laws that exist in USP member countries, and how they are made, applied and enforced in these countries. The course starts by considering principles of justice and professionalism for court actors. It provides a historical introduction to the development of laws in USP member countries then moves to examine the laws of the State. The course concludes by considering the rules of custom that exist in countries of the region and how they relate to the laws of the State.


COJ02            Courts & Their Processes                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into the Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an overview of different types of actions and procedures that may be found in Pacific courts. It then focuses in more detail on civil courts and procedure and criminal courts and procedure. The section on civil courts in this course is designed to offer a basic introduction to the composition, jurisdiction and operation of civil courts.  The section on criminal courts in this course is designed to offer a basic introduction to the composition, jurisdiction and operation of criminal courts.


COJ03            Criminal Law                                                                     


Prerequisites: COJ01 and COJ02

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: O at C

This course is designed to offer a basic introduction to criminal liability and sentences. It covers the elements of some important offences and defences, the ways in which a person may commit an offence, the range of sentence options, and the principles and process of sentencing.


COJ04            Civil Law                                                                             


Prerequisites: COJ01 and COJ02

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: O at C

This course refreshes students’ knowledge of civil law and increases students understanding of the law of contracts and the law of torts. Students are also introduced to legal principles relating to remedies in contracts and torts and reasoning processes for determining disputes in contracts and torts.


DG100           Introduction to Leadership, Governance & Human Rights


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B and P at C

The course explores how modern concepts of leadership and governance differ from traditional South Pacific notions. It asks what is expected of modern leaders, what is meant by good governance, and what are human rights and where do they come from? The course explores the links between leadership, governance and human rights on the one hand, and “development” on the other. The course introduces the use of a “gender lens” as an analytical tool.


DG101           Principles of Good Leadership & Governance


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B and P at C                                               Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores several themes regarding leadership and governance introduced in DG100. In particular, it analyses principles of ethical leadership and examines two important theories of leadership: transformational leadership and adaptive leadership. The course considers how negotiation and dispute resolution skills expand a person’s leadership capacity. It analyses patterns of leadership in the South Pacific. Regarding governance, the course examines transparency and accountability, two key aspects of good governance. It also considers how corruption undermines good governance and looks at causes and cures. The components of a good governance regime are proposed whether for a small organisation, a business or a national government.


DG102           Laws, Legal Systems & Access to Justice


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B and P at C

In this course, students will learn how to navigate legal systems and how to assist others to do so. The course will consider the sources of modern theories of law and justice and the role of laws. It will analyse how laws are made and how out-dated or deficient laws can be improved. The role of formal and informal courts will be examined. The functions of the police, legal aid, judiciary, lawyers, prosecution, and the corrections services will be analysed. Analysis of case studies of litigants and ‘victims’ of crime.


DG200           Human Rights at Local, National, Regional & International


Prerequisites: DG100

Semester 1: B and P at C                                               Semester 2: Not offered

This course considers, from the perspective of a Pacific Island person, the extent to which that person’s human rights are protected and promoted. The course analyses the strengths and limitations of human rights protections at local, national, regional and international levels. Particular attention is given to United Nations human rights mechanisms, and several UN treaties are examined to assess their relevance for Pacific Islanders. Topics considered include women’s rights, the rights of those with disabilities and children’s rights. Also considered are human rights and education, HIV AIDS, and climate change. The course asks whether a human rights culture exists in the South Pacific.


DG201           Introduction to the Role & Challenges of Human Rights Defenders


Prerequisites: DG100

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course deals with “Human rights defender” who, individually or with others, act to protect human rights. It looks at the dangers that human rights defenders face in their fight for justice. The 12 topics in this course try to define who human rights defenders are, the support and protection they have from the State, protective documents e.g. the UN Declaration, the six special procedures and special rapporteur on human rights defenders, business and human rights and the shrinking democratic working space of HRDs. The course also looks at the Pacific experience of human rights defenders in the last 20 years.


DG202           Corruption & Anti-Corruption in Pacific Island Countries


Prerequisites: DG101

Semester 1: B at C                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Systemic corruption has undermined good governance and development in the Pacific. We need the (future) leaders of the Pacific to understand corruption in a holistic manner. This course is designed to teach students about what corruption is, what causes corruption, the effects of corruption to the wider society and particularly to the vulnerable groups, anti-corruption laws and policies in the Pacific Island Countries, and what leaders and individuals could do to address corruption. While the course will address global issues relating to corruption, it will strongly focus on Pacific Island Countries.


DG301           Leadership, Governance & Human Rights Internship


Prerequisites: DG200 and admission in the Diploma in Leadership, Governance and Human Rights

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B and P at C

This course is a structured and supervised course that provides students with opportunities to apply, in real-life situations, the knowledge, skills and perspectives gained from studying other Diploma courses. Students will be expected to carry out a project in a workplace of their choice, such as an NGO, faith-based organisation, school, local government authority or agency. The course lecturer may assist students to seek for placement. Through practical work or project experience, students will apply knowledge and skills gained from other Diploma courses to broaden their work capacity and experience.


DG302           Building Resilience Among Human Rights Defenders


Prerequisites: DG201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The increasingly shrinking space for civil society means that the environments that human rights defenders work in have become more challenging. Mass surveillance and stricter laws on civil society are all threats to the vital work and livelihood of a human rights defender. For human rights defenders to be able to continue their work safely and effectively, building resilience to these external pressures is key. It allows a human rights defender and their organisation to anticipate, prepare for, respond and adapt to changes and disruptions so that they can survive and thrive. This 300 level course will aim to empower individuals/activist/human rights defenders with skills to build long-term resilience.


DG400           Advanced Research Methodology                          


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Diploma

Semester 1: O at C                                     Semester 2: O at C

This course introduces participants to the rationale of and different approaches to research. Students acquire the necessary basic technical skills to conduct independent research and also gain practical experience in the use of these skills. The main content of the course is a practical approach to the conduct of social science research projects. A major portion of the course assessment will be the practical research including data collection and analysis, and research proposals write up. It provides students with the knowledge and skill to conduct surveys and in-depth studies. Students will be taught basic statistics and will also gain hands-on experience with computer software and statistical packages.

All students registering in Postgraduate programmes are required, in their first semester of studies, to complete 14.5hours of Information Research Skills conducted by the Library.


DG403           Public Financial Management                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                          Semester 2: Not offered

Management of the financial activities of governments, whether with respect to the management of budgets, management of government business enterprises, prudent supervision of government financial enterprises, or management of provident funds or other trust funds held on behalf of the public, is a key area needing improvement in governance. Instances of grand corruption usually take place through these avenues. Students will be taught the principles of good budgeting systems and public financial management. They will also examine the issues involved in budgetary and financial management reform, and what is involved in the effective prudential supervision of financial institutions including the banking system, provident funds and stabilisation and other trust funds.


DG404           Ethics of Governance                                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course introduces basic ethics concepts and relates themes to the challenges of governance. Accordingly the course will look at the concept of ethics, ethics in relation to morality, ethics in relation to law, and ethics as expressed in concepts of justice, fairness, rights and social contract.


DG405           Special Topic in Governance in the Pacific 


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not Offered

This course is offered to cater for the academic needs and development interests of individual students. Course content will vary with individual circumstances, for example a course a) relate to intended thesis work, b) comprising components from more than one course, c) offered by more than one discipline, d) with a significant experimental component, or e) taken at the discretion of another department or school, in each a student covers topics for which he/she does not have the normal prerequisites.


DG406           Theories of Governance


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The course introduces graduate students to the major current theories of governance and explores the relationships between these theories and actual practice. On the basis of this sound conceptual framework students will be better equipped to assess governance practices in the real world. The course has two sections, the first looking at the possibility of governance theory, the second looking at current governance themes. The first section examines current theories of governance, governance and the state (institution building), governance and society (deliberative policy networks and the possibilities of self-governance and co-governance), and governance as communication. The second part of the course, on current themes, examines the ideas of governance for human development, digital governance, multi-level governance, governance and dispute resolution; governance of small states, and the measurement of governance using indicators.


DG407           Conflict & Justice                                                          


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

In the contemporary world there are numerous conflicts including openly violent conflicts which generally have negative consequences for the people in these very difficult circumstances. In addition to gross violation of human rights including loss of lives, livelihoods and property, there is displacement of large numbers of people who may end up as refugees. Conflict is often seen as emerging from the failure of the state and its institutions to address perceived and real issues regarding unfair treatment and injustices. These may arise out of social exclusion, differential treatment based on ethnicity (`race’, culture, and religion), competition over natural resources and/or the distribution of the earnings from such resources as well as the environmental and social consequences of the exploitation of such resources, and competition over political power. This course will examine a range of conflict situations, their causes and consequences with a particular reference to conflicts in Oceania, and will assess the processes adopted to resolve conflicts in the short and longer terms, and their outcomes and ask the question if social justice has been achieved. Institutional arrangements for peace building, reconciliation and long term stability will be examined.


DG408           Public Policy Implementation & Appraisal


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines processes of policy planning, implementation, and evaluation. Given the importance of successful policy implementation in the Pacific region, it is highly desirable that graduates of the governance programme have a thorough understanding of the processes of policy development, the challenges of successful policy implementation, and techniques of policy implementation evaluation.


DG410           Development Theories & Alternatives                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines issues related to development and change within the context of a group of diverse societies often referred to as the Third World. In it we will research the impact of colonialism and its legacies on these societies, the changing character and meaning of development, and the nature of relationships between class and race as well as between tradition and modernity. We will also examine the politics of identity and indigenousness, the significance of democracy for developing civil society and human rights, and the role of state institutions in fostering development and change to help draw together these themes and to ensure that we grasp the connections between them. We will derive some of our early examples from Fiji. Its relatively small size will make our study more manageable, although the issues raised remain international in their scope and complex in their depth.


DG411           Governance & Governments in the South Pacific


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

A “state” can be defined in various ways and the broadest definition includes the regime in power and public institutions including three branches of a government: judiciary; executive; and parliament. Structures and quality of these three public institutions are crucial to determine the governance of the state. Of course, structure and quality of other institutions such as local governments, political parties, civil society organisations and private corporate sectors as well as traditional institutions (e.g. chiefly system) and informal systems (e.g. social capital) are also important in determining the characteristics of governance of a state.


DG413           Special Topic in Development Studies 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is offered to cater for the academic needs and development interests of individual students. Course content will vary with individual circumstances, for example a course a) relating to intended thesis work, b) comprising components from more than one course, c) offered by more than one discipline, d) with a significant experiential component, or e) taken at the discretion of another department or school, in which a student covers topics for which he or she does not have the normal prerequisites.


DG414           Special Topic in Development Studies 2


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is offered to cater for the academic needs and development interests of individual students. Course content will vary with individual circumstances, for example a course a) relating to intended thesis work, b) comprising components from more than one course, c) offered by more than one discipline, d) with a significant experiential component, or e) taken at the discretion of another department or school, in which a student covers topics for which he or she does not have the normal prerequisites.


DG415           Urbanisation, Development & Urban Planning


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is based on an interdisciplinary approach to theoretical development issues concerning urbanisation, and the dynamics of Third World urban development. It is designed to help students undertake scientific inquiry and research on emerging urban issues particularly in the context of Pacific Islands. The course deals with contemporary urban development issues including urban infrastructure and basic services, and issues of urban employment and the environment. Considerable attention is also given to urban planning/development policies and strategies within the broader framework of sustainable development.


DG416           Development Internship                                            


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Development Internship is a structured supervised educational course that provides students practical experience working in selected international and regional organisations, government ministries and departments, parliaments, NGOs and civil society organisations. The course is designed to enable students both to demonstrate and to enhance their development knowledge and skills through placement experience and project work.


DG417           NGOs, Civil Society & Development                       


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

People-centred development, incorporating greater popular participation, is now recognised as an important development strategy. Civil society organisations (CSOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with their participatory approaches and grassroots connections have emerged as important catalysts for change and development. This course examines the nature of and processes involved in the deepening of democracy through civil society organisations.


DG421           Development & Change in the Contemporary Pacific               


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

Starting from an understanding of ‘development’ as a deeply contested social, political and economic project, the course explores tensions around development issues and paradigms in the Pacific context. It investigates the central question of what development means in the contemporary Pacific. Pacific conceptions of the “good life” are juxtaposed against those that underpin the dominant development orthodoxies of neo-liberalism and economic growth. The course highlights the agency of Pacific people and communities, and the emergence of a diverse and dynamic range of hybrid forms of development in the Pacific. These perspectives challenge enduring deficit framings of Pacific development.


DG422           Environmental Change & Green Development


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                                  Semester 2: Not offered

This course is multidisciplinary in nature. It is designed to provide students with knowledge about contemporary debates on environment-development and climate change. The course focuses on environmental and climate change and their impacts at different levels: global, regional, national and local. Greenhouse gases, global warming, sea level rise, and their consequences will be critically examined. Responses to environmental challenges with a mix of more sustainable development initiatives such as renewable energy resources and green technologies will be discussed. The course will also cover green-politics/eco-politics, environmental movements, green development and environmental migration. The course will have special focus on the Small Islands Developing States (SIDS) and Pacific Island Countries (PICs).


DG600F         Development Studies & Governance SRP (Full-Time)


A Supervised Research Project (SRP) is a small thesis of 30,000 words, taken as part of a Master’s degree along with two Development Studies/Governance 400 level courses.


DG600P        Development Studies & Governance SRP (Part-Time)


A Supervised Research Project (SRP) is a small thesis of 30,000 words, taken as part of a Master`s degree along with two Development Studies/Governance 400 level courses.


DG700F         Development Studies & Governance Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)


A Master`s thesis is a major study of 50,000 words on a subject developed in conjunction with the supervisor. In it the student will need to demonstrate mastery of research skills and ability to present and argue a thesis.


DG700P        Development Studies & Governance Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)


A Master`s thesis is a major study of 50,000 words on a subject developed in conjunction with the supervisor. In it the student will demonstrate mastery of research skills and the ability to present and argue a thesis.


DG750F         Development Studies & Governance DRP (Full-Time)



DG750P        Development Studies & Governance DRP (Part-Time)



DG800F         Development Studies & Governance PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

DG800P        Development Studies & Governance PhD Thesis (Part-Time)

DOJ01           Professionalism and Communication in Court Practice


Prerequisites: COJ01, COJ02, COJ03 and COJ04

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course will introduce students to principles of professionalism in the courts, and in particular, access to justice, public service and judicial ethics. As effective communication is a vital aspect of professionalism this course will induct students in the general principles and practices of effective communication using plain language, and in the use of special language in the courts, law and justice.


DOJ02           Judicial Administration                                                 


Prerequisites: COJ01, COJ02, COJ03 and COJ04

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Students in this course will learn how to apply basic principles of management to administering court business. The course will be organized around four themes: organisation, including administering court calendars and diaries; time: including managing personal workload and setting and managing time standards; people: including handling public inquiries, administering litigants and managing public relations; and staff:  including administering court personnel and teamwork.


GN400           Contemporary Feminism, Theory, Methods & Debates for Gender Research


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores current issues and debates regarding feminist theory, methodology and epistemology and applying it to gender-related topics of study. The goal is to provide an introductory framework for gendered research using a feminist perspective and methodology. The course is to assist the prospective postgraduate researcher in engaging with contemporary feminist theory, research methods, and methodology (ies). Active student participation is required on all components of coursework.


GN401           Gender, Global Change & Development in a Comparative Perspective


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course examines the emergence in the 1970s of the field of women, gender and development, its research agenda and theoretical and policy debates. The feminist critique of development practice is examined as well as the social, political and economic aspects of gender relations. The course is to assist the prospective postgraduate researcher in engaging with contemporary global gender issues in the context of development. Active student participation is required on all components of coursework.


GN402           Gender and Environment


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1:B at C                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course will provide a forum for the critical examination and understanding of the way the category of gender plays out in environmental issues, with a focus on the Pacific Island Countries. It will explore how the environment shapes gender roles, norms and relations, and how these in turn affect the use, management and conservation of its resources, as well as social responses to climate change. It will consider how gender inequalities and issues of women’s empowerment shine through, examine ecofeminist theory, and highlight the relationship between gender justice and environmental justice. The course will teach students to apply a gender lens in the analysis of environment-related issues in the region. Active student participation will be required on all components of coursework.


HY101           Pacific Islands Prehistory


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

HY101 covers Pacific history from the earliest times to about 1800. It surveys the original exploration and colonisation of the Pacific Ocean by the ancestors of the Micronesians, Melanesians and Polynesians, and the ways that they developed their societies. We will consider the environmental impact of islanders on their new homes, the development of sailing and navigation, the growth of warfare and chiefdoms, and finish with a survey of traditional Pacific societies.


HY102           20th Century World History                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course analyses causes, effects and impacts of events in the twentieth century and examines several of the most important changes ending with the aftermath of the Cold War.


HY201           Pacific History: Colonial Worlds to Independence


Prerequisites: HY101 and HY102

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course covers the history of European administrations in the Pacific through to independence. An additional theme is the involvement and response of Pacific Islanders to these changing circumstances.


HY202           Pacific History: Pre-colonial Power Struggle in Polynesia


Prerequisites: HY101 and HY102

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course examines the motivations and behavior of Polynesian leaders in their struggle to maintain power and control. What worked and what failed in their experiments to create modern governments? What are the lessons for leaders of the modern Pacific?


HY206           Modern East Asian History


Prerequisites: HY101 and HY102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

The course complements other History and related courses by providing background knowledge of a region with historical association with the Pacific and whose impact and importance to the Pacific Islands has been intensifying. The course examines how Asian societies have responded to the forces of modernity since ca. 1840s and what lessons can be learnt from their experiences.


HY207           Pacific History: Melanesian Worlds


Prerequisites: HY101 and HY102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course explores the histories of Melanesian worlds, from Papua New Guinea to Vanuatu, the Solomon Islands and New Caledonia. It examines how Melanesian societies have evolved differently, in their relations with one another, their environment and foreign intruders. The course also discusses core values and issues that Melanesian communities have shared, particularly issues of land ownership and political organisation. Ultimately, the course will ask students to question what it means to be Melanesian.


HY302           Special Topic: History of Fiji


Prerequisites: Two 200 Level HY or PL courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course examines the history of Fiji from 1870 to 1970 and the social and political arrangements immediately before and after British annexation. This story ends with the events leading to independence in 1970.


HY303           Special Topic: USA in Asia Pacific Region


Prerequisites: Two 200 Level HY or PL courses

Semester 1: O at C                                                                Semester 2: Not offered

HY303 examines the gradual involvement of the USA in the Pacific Islands, beginning with fur traders and whaling through to annexations, nuclear testing and the granting of independence to Micronesia. It is a study of the USA as a colonial power.


HY304           Pacific History: Protest & Identity


Prerequisites: Two 200 Level HY or PL courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: O at C

The course examines the way Pacific Island histories have been recorded. It is a parallel study of decolonisation, a literate revolution and the changing historiography of the Pacific.


HY305           British Empire & Commonwealth


Prerequisites: Two 200 Level HY or PL courses

Semester 1: B at C                                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course looks at a range of motivations that informed the policy behind Britain’s imperial expansion. Through case studies from the British Empire and the Commonwealth, the course examines historians’ interpretations and the effects on societies under the British control.


HY401           Reading & Viewing in Pacific History                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

HY401 examines the history of how the Pacific and its peoples have been represented in the past by artists, writers, anthropologists, photographers and filmmakers. From the art of early European voyages to recent films by Islanders, emphasis is given to representations that emerged from encounters. Students in this course will be required to reflect on both the history and theory of ‘viewing’ and ‘representing’


HY402           Migration & Culture                                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course examines contemporary diasporic patterns of Pacific Islanders in the Pacific region through field research with a particular emphasis on the concept and reality of identity, relocated communities, status of minority groups and representation in the host community.This course has a fieldtrip component. Students will be required to pay fees to fund the fieldtrip.


HY404           Special Topic


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This is a seminar-based course. Students are to examine various types of historical sources and to work on research projects. The focus changes according to student interest and staff expertise, for example, past topics include the Miss Hibiscus festival, church history, and race and racism.


HY600F         History SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                                                                                        

HY600P         History SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                                

HY700F         History Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                          

HY700P         History Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                         

HY750F         History DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                                

HY750P         History DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                               

HY800F         History PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                                   

HY800P         History PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                                  

LW110          Law & Society                                                           


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L & E and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course considers, among other things, the question of what is law and the difference between law, justice, ethics and morality. It also looks at the different types of legal systems including the criminal and civil justice systems. The question of who decides law and justice issues, the sources of law and the historical development of law in the South Pacific is also considered as well as current issues for law and lawmakers.


LW111          Courts & Dispute Resolution 1                            


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L & E and O at C***                              Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces first-year students to the skills essential to the practice of law: analysis, writing, and oral advocacy. Study of the court structure, process and personnel, the nature of legal reasoning and the doctrine of precedent establish the framework through which students will learn to draft clear and concise predictive legal analysis using grammatical English. Students enrolled in face-to-face mode will also begin to develop oral advocacy skills through presentations in tutorials.


LW112          Legislation


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: F at L & E and O at C***

This course considers how Parliaments work as law-making bodies. It looks at the history of Parliaments in the South Pacific and the operation of South Pacific, United Kingdom and other statutes. Other matters to be considered include the Constitution and statutes as sources of law; types of legislation; reporting legislation; introduction to the rules concerning statutory interpretation; legal language.


LW113          Courts & Dispute Resolution 2


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: F at L & E and O at C***

This course builds on the skills developed in LW111 Courts and Dispute Resolution I and introduces students to legal research. The nature of legal reasoning will be examined in greater depth, particularly with respect to the determination of issues and the resolution of legal complexities. The focus writing exercises will shift from predictive to persuasive legal analysis, with continued emphasis on the importance of grammatical English expression. Finally, students enrolled in face- to-face mode will continue to develop their oral advocacy skills through the presentation of longer, and more formal arguments in court settings.


LW201          Law of Contract 1                                                    


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at L & E and O at C***                              Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to be the first of two courses on the law of contract. The second is the second semester course LW202 Law of Contract II. The course commences with an introduction to contract law and a consideration of its place within the legal systems of the USP region, including an examination of contract and customary law. This is followed by an examination of the requirements that are necessary to the formation of a contract. The course also deals with contractual terms and considers the relationship between the law of contract and the doctrine of estoppel.


LW202          Law of Contract 2                                                    


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L & E and O at C***

This course is the second of two courses in contract law and follows LW201 Law of Contract I.  This course examines the circumstances in which a contract may be set aside by the courts. This includes where one of the parties to the contract is under a disability, and the doctrines of mistake, undue influence, unconscionability and illegality. This course also considers the way in which a valid contract is discharged and remedies for breach of contract are also examined.


LW203          Torts 1                                                                         


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at L & E and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to be the first of two courses on the law of torts and to precede LW204.This course examines trespass to the person and related areas, principles of negligence including special topics, e.g. defective products, defective promises, employer`s liability to employees, statutory torts, general defences, assessment of damages, death in relation to tort, loss distribution.


LW204          Torts 2                                                                         


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L & E and O at C***

This course is designed to be the second of two courses on the law of torts and to follow LW203 Torts I. It examines in detail defamation, passing off (interference with intellectual property) nuisance and related topics. It also examines the law relating to the identification and quantification of different damages, and the use of equitable remedies such as injunctions.


LW205          Criminal Law & Procedure 1                                


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at L & E and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course commences with a general introduction to the theory and practice of criminal law, examining the sources of criminal law in the South Pacific, and the doctrines involved in establishing criminal liability. The course then proceeds to consider a number of discrete areas of substantive criminal law, including homicide (murder, provocation and manslaughter), assault and related offences, sexual offences, property offences (including white collar crime) and public order offences.


LW206          Criminal Law & Procedure 2                                


Prerequisites: Four 100 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 100 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L & E and O at C***

There are three major parts to the course. The first is an examination of the most commonly used criminal defences, including intoxication, self-defence, insanity, automatism, duress, coercion, mistake and also a number of general issues in defences. The second part of the course moves on to examining in detail a number of doctrines involved in criminal law, including participation in crime and preparatory offences. The third part of the course is concerned with criminal procedure and the criminal justice system as it operates within the South Pacific region, including sentencing.


LW300          Property Law 1                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E & L and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of general principles of property law. In particular the course considers the concept of property and its significance in society, the nature and range of interests and rights that people can have in relation to property, and the ways in which law is used to regulate, control and protect the acquisition, use and alienation of property. Consideration is given to personal property, including intellectual property and real property within the context of the laws and customs of the countries within the USP region. LW300 provides the foundation for LW301.


LW301          Property Law 2                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E & L and O at C***

This course concentrates on introduced land law. In particular, there will be considerations of freehold estates, perpetual estates, fixed term estates, inheritable estates, commoners` allotments, leasehold estates; the registration system for such estates; and the physical planning legislation that regulates the use of such land in many countries of the USP region.


LW302          Equity & Trusts                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the operation of equitable doctrines and trust law principles in common law systems with a focus on their application in the countries of the USP region. It covers the history of the equitable jurisdiction and their local application, concepts of equitable property, and the introduction to several of the major principles, doctrines and remedies of equity. It also provides the students with an understanding of different types of trusts; such as express, resulting and constructive trusts. Students are also introduced to the basic principles relating to the creation and winding up of trusts, trust administration, the rights, duties, powers and liabilities of a trustee and the rights and interests of trust beneficiaries.


LW303          Succession                                                                                                                      


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course deals with the principles of law of testate and intestate succession as applied in the countries of the South Pacific region. It examines topics such as the making of wills, including custom and privileged wills, and the formal and substantial requirements for wills. It also considers revocation, revival and republication of wills, the nature of testamentary gifts, the rules relating to the construction of wills, and the rules relating to the distribution of intestate property. The final part of the course is concerned with the legal requirements relating to the administration of deceased estates, the duties of personal representatives, the winding up of the estate, and family provision legislation.


LW304          Legal Drafting                                                                 


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E & L and O at C ***

This course begins with identifying and developing the basic skills to correct ambiguity and vagueness in drafting, draft in gender neutral language, and use grammatically correct, plain English with correct punctuation and tabulation. The course then introduces students to the various types of documents most commonly drafted by lawyers, and develops students’ skills and techniques to draft those documents. Through practice and feedback, students are given the opportunity to develop those drafting skills to standards required in legal practice in the context of specific types of documents. The course also teaches students various approaches to interpreting these legal documents.


LW305          Current Developments in Pacific Law                    


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E and O at C**

This course provides students with an opportunity to study and debate socio-legal developments in Pacific countries that are of current significance. It has a focus on law reform and prepares students to contribute to law reform initiatives in their own countries in the future.


LW306          Legal Ethics                                                                     


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E & L and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

Any person studying for a professional degree should have some knowledge of the ethical principles upon which the practice of all professions is based. Students of law in particular require an understanding not only of the organisation, nature, structure, practice and operation of the legal profession, but also an appreciation of the ethics which impact upon their work as lawyers` and their relationship with the community. The duties imposed on the lawyer can be seen as being grounded in ethics. These duties, to the court and to the client, will be considered in this course.


LW307          Evidence                                                                          


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                  Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims to provide an understanding of the law relating to the production of evidence in courts and tribunals of first instance in countries of the USP region. This course examines in detail the kinds of evidence, the onus and standard of proof, matters that do not need to be proved, matters that may be proved, matters that may not be proved, evidence which cannot be accepted without corroboration, and evidence which must be accepted with caution and the exclusionary rules and exceptions. This course also considers skills of advocacy relating to and the public policies that underlie the rules of evidence in relation to the production of evidence.


LW308          Constitutional Law


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E & L and O at C***                        Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the law relating to the constitutions of countries of the South Pacific. This course examines in some detail the provisions of written constitutions, relating both to government and to fundamental rights and freedoms, also to judicial remedies for contravention of the provisions of a written constitution. In addition this course considers legislation, principles of common law and equity and rules of customary law to the extent that they relate to the constitutions of countries of USP region.


LW309          Administrative Law                                                      


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses BA

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E & L and O at C***

This course provides an understanding of administrative law and its application in the countries of the South Pacific. The course examines in detail the principles of judicial review of decisions by public officials and institutions, in particular the principles of lack and excess of jurisdiction, abuse of power, error of law, unfairness, repugnancy and uncertainty. The course also examines the scope and availability of the remedies that can be provided by the courts.


LW310          Family Law                                                                      


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

The purpose of this course is to provide some understanding of the law relating to the family in countries of the USP Region. This course will examine in some detail marriage, dissolution of marriage, nullity of marriage, separation, legitimacy and legitimisation of children, custody, guardianship, maintenance and adoption of children, as provided under legislation, common law and equity and custom. The course will also consider the distribution of income and property between family members and the recognition of overseas orders and decrees relating to the family.


LW312          E-Commerce Law                                                                                                          


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is one which will normally be offered by an academic visitor or member of staff in the School covering an area of specialised interest which is not otherwise provided for in the curriculum.


LW314          Special Topic                                                                                                                  


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course permits a staff member or academic visitor to offer an elective on a topic related to their research interests. The subject-matter of the course may vary each semester.


LW317          Health Law & Ethics                                                                                                     


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course deals with the relationship between the law and those in the health-care professions. The relationship between the law and medicine also involves questions of ethics. Topic areas covered by the course include: consent to medical treatment, medical negligence, death and dying, access to medical records, confidentiality, abortion, surrogacy, expert medical witnesses and complaints against health care professionals and professional misconduct.


LW322          Intellectual Property Law                                           


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                  Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the major categories of intellectual property, namely copyright, patent, trademarks, designs, confidential information, trade secrets, character merchandising and passing off. It also considers the global nature of intellectual property and in particular examines the international agreements and conventions that govern intellectual property in the world today. The course provokes students to examine the law of intellectual property critically by focussing on some of the issues of relevance to the region today, such as the role of intellectual property in protecting traditional knowledge and culture and biological resources.


LW324          European Union Law Relating to the Pacific                      


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of the legal and political systems of the European Union (EU) and its relations with Third Countries outside the EU. Students will be introduced to the classic EU law, consisting of constitutional law and internal market law. Moreover, EU`s role as a key player in a globalised setting will be discussed. Here, the course will focus on current EU involvement in the South Pacific and the relevant legal arrangements as part of EU`s external economic and development policies. In addition, current and future challenges for the South Pacific as well as regional integration developments will be discussed against the background of legal agreements such as PICTA, PACER and Economic Partnership Agreements with the EU.


LW330          Public International Law                                             


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E and O at C**

The aim for this course is to provide an understanding of the law relating to international and Regional relations between states, and relating to international institutions. The course examines in detail the sources of public international law, and the rights, powers and duties of states, Regional and international institutions and representatives.


LW331          Human Rights                                                                


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                  Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of international human rights law and aspects of the law relating to the rights and freedoms of individuals in countries of the USP Region. Individual rights are considered in the context of international and regional human rights institutions and conventions and the legislative provisions of the countries of the USP Region. Challenges to the formulation and adoption of universal models of rights are examined, particularly those relevant to the USP region. The course examines in some detail matters such as the right to life, issues of equality and non-discrimination, rights to liberty and freedom from unlawful arrest, search and questioning, and rights to freedoms of conscience, expression, movement, association and assembly. The course also looks at the means available for the protection of such rights and freedoms.


LW334          Serious Financial Crimes                                             


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: O at C

This course examines the complex webs which may be used as cover for the commission of serious financial crimes. The following represent some of the topic areas included in the course: The basic legal structure of incorporated bodies such as, companies, charities and trusts; company and related accounts and financial statements; operations of off-shore centres and tax havens; legal and financial aspects of money laundering; financing of major international criminal activities such as, human trafficking; narcotics trafficking and terrorism; internet and computer fraud; regional and global regulatory mechanisms and applicable laws and conventions.


LW340          Pacific Land Tenure                                                                                                      


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2:Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide some understanding of systems of land tenure in countries of USP region. This course will examine in some detail the rights and interests in land recognised under customary law in the countries. In addition this course will consider the extent to which such rights and interests can be registered and the effect of registration and non-registration.


LW341          Customary Law                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of the meaning and context of customary law in countries of the USP Region. The course begins with a consideration of some general aspects of customary law; such as the general nature and characteristics of customary law; the extent to which it is recognised by constitutions, statutes and cases in different countries of USP region; the ways in which customary law can be pleaded and proved, and the way in which conflicts about it can be resolved before the courts. Then the course examines the scope of recognition and application in Pacific Island countries of customary law in particular subject areas such as land, personal property, succession, contracts, torts, criminal matters, marriage, termination of marriage, legitimacy and adoption of children.


LW352          Regional Environmental Law                                    


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E and O at C**

The objectives of this course are to provide students with an understanding of the main environmental issues in South Pacific nations, the environmental law regimes in South Pacific nations, and the interaction between national and international environmental laws. This course builds upon the knowledge and skills gained in International Environmental Law, although it takes a national rather than international perspective. It addresses the mechanisms by which issues debated at the international level are translated into local action or legislation. Ways in which constitutional, administrative and judicial structures impact upon the implementation of environmental law will be examined. Where legislation is non-existent or largely ineffective, possible reforms will be discussed.


LW353          International Environmental Law                            


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The general aims of this course are to raise awareness of students with respect to global and Regional environmental law issues and to enhance critical thinking with respect to environmental law making, its implementation and enforcement on a global and Regional level. The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the nature of International Environmental Law and its main sources, the law of treaties and soft law instruments, the international environmental legal system and its main actors: states, international organisations and non-government organisations, the emergence and evolution of environmental principles which are shaping international environmental law and policy as well as ethics, the international and Regional environmental agreements and organisations to which Pacific Island Countries have become contracting Parties and how these influence domestic legal reform.


LW355          Law of the Sea                                                               


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                  Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the legal regime, which regulates the public aspects of marine spaces and marine resources. It covers aspects of international law and domestic laws of states which regulate such matters as claims to and delimitation of marine zones, functional uses of the seas and dispute settlement. Study will be in the context of the USP region and contemporary issues, which apply to the topic, will be examined.


LW356          Marine Law                                                                     


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This is a unique course because it combines elements of traditional law courses such as Law of the Sea, Maritime Law, Shipping Law and Admiralty Law into a single course. Therefore, it focuses on public aspects of the seas (such as baseline demarcation, maritime boundary and delimitation and jurisdiction of states over fishing, navigation, protection and preservation of the marine environment) with private aspects of the use of the seas (such as operation of ships, carriage of goods, marine insurance, admiralty jurisdiction etc). It also includes marine environmental protection, insurance and liability for pollution and marine casualties. Therefore, it provides a bird`s eye view of the law pertaining to the sea and its uses, especially within the Pacific region.


LW370          Company & Partnership Law 1                                 


Prerequisites:  Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                                Semester 2:  Not offered

This course is designed to provide an understanding of law relating to companies and partnership in the countries of the USP region. In addition, the course is aimed at developing a more focused ability to interpret and apply the law relating to companies and partnerships in the context of the South Pacific jurisdictions. The course examines in detail the nature and formation of registered companies and partnerships. The course also considers issues in capital and maintenance of capital and the management of companies and partnerships.


LW371          Company & Partnership Law 2                                                                                 


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the law relating to companies and partnerships in the countries of the USP Region. In particular, the course examines publicity, accounts and auditors of companies. The course also discusses members’ rights, corporate reconstruction and dissolution of companies. The course also considers in detail the rights, liabilities of members and dissolution of partnership. Finally, cooperatives and other arrangements for the conduct of business affairs in the countries of the USP Region will be discussed.


LW372          Commercial Law                                                            


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E and O at C**

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the laws relating to commercial transactions in countries of the USP region. In addition, the course aims to develop a more focused ability to interpret and apply the laws relating to commercial transactions in the context of the South Pacific jurisdictions. The course examines in detail the law relating to negotiable instruments, the sale of goods, agency, banking, insurance and reinsurance, commercial securities and intellectual property. Other aspects of the course include credit, consumer and security transactions.


LW373          Foreign Trade & Investment Law


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide an understanding of the law relating to foreign trade and investment in countries of the USP region. The course examines in detail the laws relating to the regulation of foreign trade, the financing of such trade, and the transport and insurance of overseas trade. In addition, the course considers the laws relating to investment from domestic and overseas sources and some of the main forms of investment in countries of the USP region.


LW374          Revenue & Taxation Law                                                                                           


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to provide an understanding of taxation and revenue law in countries of the USP Region. The course examines in some detail the principles and forms of direct taxation, particularly income tax, rent tax, turnover tax, value added tax, and the principal forms of indirect taxation, particularly customs duty, excise duty and licence fees. In addition, the course considers the impact of international treaties and agreements relating to taxation.


LW375          Labour Law                                                                                                                     


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The course is designed to provide an understanding of the employment relationship. This course examines in detail aspects of employment contracts as regulated by the common law and statutory provision. It primarily focuses upon the individual employment contract in the private sector. Work related issues such as occupational safety and health, equal employment opportunities and injuries at work are also considered. The context of employment in the Pacific, including Pacific labour history, industrial relations and the role of international organisations is also discussed.


LW390          Research Project                                                           


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

Restricted Enrolment

This course is only available to graduates. The purpose of this course is to enable selected graduates (with a GPA comprised between 3.0 and 3.5), seeking admission to USP postgraduate studies, to extend their research skills and their knowledge and understanding of an aspect of the law in countries of the USP region which is of particular interest to them. The students will work on research projects under the supervision of a member of staff. The research project must be approved by the Course Coordinator and a suitable supervisor from the School of Law academic staff must be available.


LW391          Law Clinic                                                                         


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: F at E and L                                                Semester 2: F at E and L

Restricted Enrolment

Law Clinic is conducted at the Community Legal Information  Centre at Emalus Campus, Port Vila and the Community Legal Information  Centre at Laucala Campus, Suva. The Centres provide legal  information and assistance to clients who cannot afford a private lawyer. However only legal information is provided and assistance in filling out or drafting Court documents,and not legal representation Students are trained in legal skills, professional practice and ethics and gain practical experience under supervision, to interview and take instructions from clients, correspond with  law firms,assist with drafting court documents, research and provide information on relevant laws to the public. ‘Law Clinic’ is NOT a substitute for the Professional Diploma in Legal Practice (PDLP), students whose home jurisdictions do not require completion of the PDLP. Student enrolment numbers will be capped to allow for supervision and/or work placement prospects. Students must meet a minimum GPA requirement of 2.5. Where enrolment numbers exceed supervisory capacity or available work placement allocation, final selection of students will be determined by their GPA.


LW392          Civil Procedure                                                                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not Offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to provide an understanding of law regulating civil procedure and alternative methods of dispute resolution. This course traces in detail the procedural steps that must be followed in the conduct of civil proceedings in all the courts of countries in USP region, from those procedures that must be taken before the commencement of proceedings to those that are taken for the enforcement of judgments. The course also looks briefly at special rules of procedure including judicial review and alternative methods for the resolution of disputes such as arbitration and mediation.


LW393          Advocacy Skills & Prosecutorial Practice                                                              


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Restricted Enrolment

This course aims to develop your skills of advocacy and provide you with knowledge and understanding of the components of good advocacy including the practical application of the rules of evidence and trial procedure and the principles of ethical and professional conduct that apply in the trial context. In this course students will examines various advocacy skills and ways of prosecuting offences. Areas included in the course are developing a Theory of the Case and analysis of evidence, making an effective Opening and Closing address, effectively conducting an Examination in Chief of your own witnesses, Cross examination of an opponent’s witness and Re examination of your witness. The course will also examine the rules relating to Rebuttal evidence and analyse the rules governing the Taking of Objections and meeting No Case Submissions. In addition prosecutorial practices including prosecutorial responsibilities, ethical obligations, disclosure and calling of witnesses and the decision to prosecute will be considered.


LW395          Special Topic                                                                  


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course permits a staff member or academic visitor to offer an elective on a topic related to their research interests. The subject-matter of the course may vary each semester.


LW395A       Special Topic International Fisheries Law                                                             


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at E and O at C**

The course examines the sources and scope of international regulation of fisheries, with particular reference to the Pacific region, and the mechanisms of enforcement


LW395C        Special Topic International Criminal Law                                                                            


Prerequisites: Four 200 Level LW Courses (LLB) / three 200 Level LW Courses (BA)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course examines: the nature and structure of international criminal law and its relationship to domestic criminal law;  the history and operation of international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court; the elements of genocide, crimes against humanity , and war crimes; and issues relating to responsibility for international crimes.


LW400          Advanced Pacific Legal System                                


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2:  O at C

This course will explores in depth the evolution of the legal systems that exist in South Pacific countries today as well as certain of the major issues, problems and themes affecting the operation of these systems today. This is a core course for students undertaking the LLM degree by a combination of coursework and supervised research project.


LW402          Advanced Equity & Trusts                                         


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW302

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW302, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level


LW403          Advanced Succession                                                                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW303

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW303, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW407          Advanced Evidence                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW307

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW307, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level


LW410          Advanced Family Law                                                  


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW310

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW310, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW412          Advanced E-Commerce Law                                                                                                    


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM  Restrictions: LW312

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW312, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level


LW414          Advanced Special Topic                                                                                              


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW314, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW417          Advanced Health Law & Ethics                                                                                


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW317

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW317, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW422          Advanced Intellectual Property Law                      


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM Restrictions: LW322

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW322, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW424          Advanced European Union Law Relating to the Pacific                                    


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW324

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW324, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW430          Advanced Public International Law


Prerequisites: Admissions to LLM Restrictions: LW330

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW330, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level


LW431          Advanced Human Rights


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW331

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW331, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW434          Advanced Serious Financial Crimes


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM. Restrictions: LW334

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW334, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW440          Advanced Pacific Land Tenure                                                         


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW340

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW340, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW441          Advanced Customary Law                                          


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW341

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW341, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW452          Advanced Regional Environmental Law                


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM or MEL Restrictions: LW352

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW352, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW453          Advanced International Environmental Law


Prerequisites: Admissions to LLM or MEL Restrictions: LW353

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW353, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW455          Advanced Law of the Sea                                           


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM or MEL Restrictions: LW355

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW355, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW456          Advanced Marine Law                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW356

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2:Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW356, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level


LW470          Advanced Company & Partnership Law 1


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM Restrictions: LW370

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: F at E and O at C**                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW370, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW471          Advanced Company & Partnership Law 2                                                            


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW371

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW371, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW472          Advanced Commercial Law                                       


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM. Restrictions: LW372

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered        Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW372, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW473          Advanced Foreign Trade & Investment Law


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM. Restrictions: LW373

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW373, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW474          Advanced Revenue & Taxation Law                                                                       


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM. Restrictions: LW374

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW374, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW475          Advanced Labour Law                                                                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to the LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW375

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW375, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW490          Advanced Research Project                                       


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW390

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW390, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW492          Advanced Civil Procedure                                                                                          


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM. Restrictions: LW392

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW392, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW493          Advanced Advocacy Skills & Prosecutorial Practice


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW393

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course follows the subject matter of LW393, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW495          Advanced Special Topic                                              


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL.

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW395, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW495A       Advanced Special Topic International Fisheries Law                


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW395A

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered              Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW395A, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW495C        Advanced Special Topic International Criminal Law                 


Prerequisites: Admission to LLM or MEL. Restrictions: LW395C

Enrolment in PG law courses are restricted to students that have NOT already completed the undergraduate offering of the exact same course.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course follows the subject matter of LW395C, but assessment is tailored to postgraduate study and marked at postgraduate level.


LW600F        Law SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                                      


This is the minor thesis enrolment for full time students who have been admitted to the LLM by a combination of coursework and minor thesis.


LW600P        Law SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                                     


This is the minor thesis enrolment for part time students who have been admitted to the LLM by a combination of coursework and minor thesis.


LW700F        Law Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                               


This is the major thesis enrolment for full time students who have been admitted to the LLM by thesis only.


LW700P        Law Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                              


This is the major thesis enrolment for part time students who have been admitted to the LLM by thesis only.

LW750F        Law DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                                      



LW750P        Law DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                                    



LW800F        Law PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                                        


This is the enrolment course for students admitted to PhD study in law on a full time basis


LW800P        Law PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                                       


This is the enrolment course for students admitted to PhD study in law on a part time basis.


LWD01          Criminal Litigation Skills & Practice


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

Introduction to criminal litigation, what the Judge expects from a criminal advocate, the criminal prosecutor, rights of persons detained/arrested, police procedure, bail applications, drafting criminal charges, plea in mitigation, sentencing/alternatives to prison sentence, appealing a sentence, submissions, opinion writing, advocacy, court room practice, the defended trial process, elements of an offence, developing a case theory, examination in chief, cross examination, re-examination, opening speeches, no case to answer, closing speeches.


LWD02          Civil Litigation Skills & Practice


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

This module introduces the trainees to the litigation process starting with the preparation and filing of suits, the court rules on preparing papers and documents, the answer, and various defendant`s pleadings such as the motion to set-aside default judgements, discovery, interrogatories, request for production of documents, and preparation of pre-trial and trial paperwork and documents.


LWD03          Wills & Estates Skills & Practice                               


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

In this module the trainees receive hands on experience in dealing with law relating to wills, probates, inheritance and property management including negotiation in respect of disputes over assets in a deceased estate. They learn to take instructions from clients, draft wills and other testamentary documents and interpretation of clauses, and to draw documents for obtaining different types of grants in estates. Administration, winding up and accounting to the beneficiaries regarding estate matters is also dealt with.


LWD04          Conveyancing Skills & Practice                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

This module deals with transactions in buying, selling, transferring and leasing land and gives the trainees hands on experience in drawing all necessary documents for these transactions and handling client funds, managing client files, and dealing with appropriate registration authorities.


LWD05          Business Law, Skills & Practice                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

This module introduces trainees to the practical applications of business law such as the formation of the different business media (sole traders, partnerships and companies), drafting and interpreting of partnership agreement, Articles of Association and Memorandum of Association and related issues such as the fiduciary aspect of the stock exchange, consumer protection, bankruptcy, trust accounting and bills of exchange.


LWD06          Family Law & Human Rights, Skills & Practice


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at SAM                                 Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

Law relating marriage, separation, custody and access, divorce, matrimonial property, maintenance, domestic application of international law and application orders.


LWD07          Ethics & Professionalism & Work Skills


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

In this module trainees will learn about; 1. The rules of Professional responsibility of their jurisdictions 2. Their duties as individual lawyers to evaluate the appropriateness of their conduct in all professional situations 3. How they can apply rules of professional conduct in various professional contexts 4. Their professional responsibilities in specific professional callings and responsibilities.


LWD08          Practice Placement                                                       


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLP

Semester 1: F at L and B at E & SI                               Semester 2: F at L and B at SI

In this module trainees spend four weeks on placement in a legal environment. Placements will take place in private legal practice, national or local government departments, in industry and commerce, the courts, law enforcement agencies or non-governmental organisations. Placement is usually discussed with the trainee to avail the trainee of the best training and learning environment. They handle client files under the supervision of a practising lawyer who is required to oversee their work and write reports on them. This module exposes the trainees to real life in practice.


LWD11          Back to Basics                                                                


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

This module provides a formal introduction to the system of legislative drafting. It outlines the responsibilities of a Legislative Drafter, the importance of grammar and how to compose and express legislative sentences.


LWD12          Working Within Limits                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

This module contains descriptive matters on legislative practices and procedures. The module also provides an understanding of the constraints imposed on legislative drafters by practices arising from the way legislation is interpreted.


LWD13          Making the Right Expression                                    


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

The aim of this module is to provide students with the fundamental knowledge and skills on how to write legislative sentences to create particular legal rules (legislative syntax) and the pitfalls that should be avoided.


LWD14          Putting on the Style, Getting Organised


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

This module is designed to provide an understanding that legislation is more than a set of random legislative sentences and that the proposer`s requirements must be converted into a complete instrument that is effectively organised and structured in accordance with the legislative practice that is conventional in the student’s particular jurisdiction.

                                       


LWD15          Topping & Tailing


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

In this module students will look in detail at the technical features of legislation such as writing definitions and those things that are typically covered in preliminary and final provisions.


LWD16          Particular Cases                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

This module covers particular types of legislative provisions that are typical in Commonwealth legislation. Detailed consideration is given to legislative amendments and repeals, penal provisions, delegated powers to legislate and the drafting of subsidiary legislation.


LWD17          Drafting Workshop                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission to PDLD

30 weeks: O at C

This is a practical module that applies skills to the drafting of legislative instruments.


PL100            Politics & Government                                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and B at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

The course is designed to introduce students to the study of politics and government. Students will be encouraged to consider why politics has been so central to the lives and passions of humanity since the beginning of time. Understanding the main theories, ideologies and methodologies of politics and political science will allow students to understand contemporary politics. In addition, students will gain useful background information and techniques, which can be applied throughout the social sciences. Students will be strongly encouraged to research political systems, governments and political events in the South Pacific region.


PL101            Politics of Development                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

The course introduces students to ‘development’, both as a contested idea, and as a way forward to a more humane society. It examines the origins and dimensions of economic inequalities between and within states, competing theories of development and the influences they have had in shaping thinking and policy making at national, regional and global levels, and the interplay of internal and external actors and interests in the politics of development. Using case studies that include development success stories, the course examines a number of specific development challenges, including: poverty and ethnic, class and gender inequalities; identity politics; authoritarianism and military rule; democratisation and human rights; population growth and health crises; and the politics of environmental and natural resource management.


PL200            Pacific in a Changing World Order                          


Prerequisites: PL100 and PL101

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores the relationship between the Pacific island states and the wider world. It looks at how changes in that wider world, both material and conceptual, have influenced developments in the region from the period of European exploration to the present. It discusses the political impact of the ‘two waves of globalisation’ and examines the experience of Pacific island peoples and governments in asserting their interests globally and regionally.


PL201            International Politics                                                    


Prerequisites: PL100 and PL101

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores issues and debates in contemporary international politics. It introduces students to some fundamental concepts and ideas of international politics, including the nation state, sovereignty, diplomacy and international law. The course also examines key theoretical approaches to studying international politics and how these may help explain some contemporary global problems and processes – namely conflict, cooperation and globalisation. Issues examined in this course include terrorism, humanitarian intervention and nuclear proliferation.


PL202            Political Ideologies                                                       


Prerequisites: PL100 and PL101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

A study of political ideologies is essential in analysing the content of political thought and practice. Political ideologies provide a framework for understanding various ideas, doctrines, and theories advanced by political theorists as well as their impact on political parties and their policies. Current political ideologies emerged out of economic, social and political struggles that came to define the contours of the modern world. Although most ideologies originated in the west, opinions as to their impact and relevance to the rest of the world have been divided. This is an introductory level course on the historical development and the impact of traditional and contemporary ideologies on political movements, parties and governments.


PL203            Governance & Development in the Pacific


Prerequisites: PL100 and PL101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

Governance and development in the Pacific introduces students to current political thinking, developments and practice in the Melanesian sub-region while also highlighting similar trends and practice in Polynesia and Micronesia. As one of the political hotspots and volatile regions of the world, the Pacific presents a fascinating case for understanding the forces of politics, regional cooperation and development in third world and small islands contexts. Although the course concentrates on issues predominantly experienced by Melanesian countries, comparative analysis and case studies from the three subregions will be used to contextualise contemporary governance and development issues in the Pacific more generally.


PL300            Parties, Electoral Politics & Democracy: Case Studies


Prerequisites: Two 200 level PL courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course begins by looking at political parties and electoral systems in the context of different political systems globally. How did the idea behind party and electoral politics emerge? The course also focuses on overall factors that influence party and electoral politics in different political systems. A crucial and interesting component of the course is the study of party and electoral politics in the Pacific region. Although party politics and elections were not part of the indigenous political systems in the Pacific, through colonisation they have become a crucial aspect of determining political leadership in the modern systems of government. While party politics was adopted prior to independence in Fiji, Vanuatu and the Cook Islands, other countries such as Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea and Samoa have also adopted party politics and elections because of the parliamentary nature of their government systems. The course also focuses on: how the notion of party politics and elections as a means of strengthening democracy have been localised to suit the realities in each island country in the Pacific; the nature of party formation and electoral politics in the Pacific; strengths and weaknesses of party and electoral politics in the Pacific; and an analysis of the future of party and electoral politics in the Pacific.


PL302            International Politics of Asia-Pacific                       


Prerequisites: Two 200 level PL courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C*

This course examines the international politics of Asia and the Pacific Rim (North East Asia, South East Asia and the South Pacific). Among other things, this course examines the impact of US hegemony in Asia and the Pacific, the rise of China as a regional and global power, the prospects for peaceful reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula, Japan’s role in the region, the future of Taiwan, the threat of nuclear proliferation and the role of regional cooperation.


PL305            Politics of Human Rights                                            


Prerequisites: Two 200 level PL courses

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

Human Rights continue to be a contested and debated phenomenon in the international arena. This course introduces students to some of the key political debates relating to human rights (primarily focusing on universalism and cultural relativism) while also addressing key concerns regarding the applicability of human rights norms in regions such as Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, Europe and the Pacific. Aspects of international law regarding the acceptance of international instruments in an era of an increasing tension between realist and liberal internationalist approaches to world affairs will be discussed in relation to Pacific Island states as will the proposed development of a regional mechanism for human rights. Human rights as a concept and practical reality will be deconstructed as students are encouraged to explore the various generations of rights and assess their applicability and relevance to individuals, groups, states and regions.


PL307            Political Leadership                                                      


Prerequisites: Two 200 level PL courses

Semester 1: F at L and O at C*                                     Semester 2: Not offered

Political leadership, which is part of the world politics programme, is specifically designed to introduce students to current thinking, research and practice in a number of areas of political leadership in both industrialised countries and Pacific Island states. In this course, our view of leadership is filtered through leadership theories, which will be used to explain the behaviour of leaders in contemporary society. In addition, students will come to understand how leaders operate within their governments, and will gain an appreciation of how leaders deal with patronage, responsibility, and accountability. Throughout the course students will be strongly encouraged to research leaders and leadership systems in the South Pacific region.


PL400            Regional Diplomacy in the Pacific Islands


Prerequisites: Admission into Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

The Pacific Islands region has one of the world’s most extensive networks of regional organisations and regional regimes. These promote regional cooperation between Pacific Island countries, and shape the region’s relations with the outside world. The first half of this course examines developments in regional cooperation in the Pacific Islands from its colonial origins to the Pacific Plan. The second part applies several key theoretical perspectives to analysing regionalism in the Pacific. These include regionalism as collective diplomacy, regionalism as a response to globalisation; and regionalism as an approach to building security and order.


PL401            Pacific Islands Foreign Policy                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Foreign policy analysis is a specialised field of study that overlaps with the study of international politics and domestic political systems. This course analyses the foreign policy focus of Pacific islands states including Papua New Guinea in the post-colonial period. The course analyses the internal as well as external factors that contribute to the formulation of foreign policy in the Pacific Island states, Australia and New Zealand, as major neighbours of most Pacific Island countries play a major role in shaping Pacific Islands’ foreign policy – this is a major focus of the course. Also studied are the roles of global powers such as the United States of America, China, India and Japan. Taiwan is also welcomed by a number of Pacific Island countries such as the Solomon Islands and Kiribati and this is also a focus of this course. Guest lecturers who are diplomats from the various High Commissions and Embassies in Fiji contribute important and interesting perspectives to this course.


PL402            Intervention & Peace Building                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will provide students with an advanced understanding of the politics, norms, and challenges of intervention and peace-building at the global and regional levels. It will explore the effects of these twin practices on intervening and intervened-in states and societies, and on international peace and stability. It will discuss the key debates about the impact of intervention and peace-building on sovereignty and international relations and examine the utility of externally led peace-building, with reference to such experiences as Solomon Islands and Iraq.


PL403            Pacific Politics                                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The content of this course varies from year to year. Eligibility and restrictions for the course will depend on the content of the course offered.


PL409            Diplomacy, Negotiations & Statecraft                   


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is in three parts. The first part is a general exploration of diplomacy and diplomatic practice as an institution of international society. It examines such questions as what is diplomacy. What is its changing role and significance in the international system? What are the challenges posed for diplomacy by the changing world order of globalisation, terrorism, new media, and changing power relationships within and between the great powers? The second part explores the experience and challenges for Pacific diplomacy in this changing world order. It begins with an exploration of small state diplomacy more generally. It then moves to a consideration of Pacific diplomacy in key engagements such as the Pacific at the United Nations, collective diplomacy in relation to security, development, sovereignty and resource management. It asks whether and how Pacific diplomacy is effective and what resources and strategies it can best employ. The third part introduces diplomatic and negotiation skills through practical workshops on negotiation and diplomatic writing.


PL410            World Politics & International Relations


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims to identify key issues, institutions and ideas that shape the environment in which diplomacy and international relations are conducted. It will assess some of the key trends and transformations in contemporary world politics, such as the impact of economic globalisation, the role of global and regional institutions (the United Nations, the European Union), the rise of China and other emerging economies, and the impact of new global issues and challenges (such as environmental issues and human rights). The course will explore some major debates such as the future of sovereignty and the sovereign state system, and assess the prospects for peaceful cooperation or inter-state rivalry and conflict. Although this will be a ‘generic’ course in world politics, it will seek to focus on those global themes that are most relevant to the Pacific.


PL411            Research Essay in Diplomacy & International Affairs


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: F at L

This course is a 100 per cent research-based course. It is a core course for students pursuing a master’s degree in Diplomacy and International Affairs.

PL600F          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs SRP (Full-Time)

PL600P          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs SRP (Part-Time)

PL700F          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs Master of Arts (Full-Time)

PL700P          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs Master of Arts (Part-Time)

PL750F          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs SRP (Full-Time)

PL750P          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs SRP (Part-Time)

PL800F          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs PhD Thesis (Full-Time)

PL800P          Politics, Diplomacy & International Affairs PhD Thesis (Part-Time)

PP101            Contemporary Issues in Pacific Policing


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course will address the political and legal relationship between police agencies and other government departments, police relationships with youth and vulnerable groups, community policing, and the increasing requirement for human resource deployment in a limited or resource constrained environment. Participants will also be introduced to emerging global issues such as terrorism, transnational and cross border crimes and how these can affect regional security and governance. A learning environment will be provided for participants to consider the nature of future developments in policing, standards of police professionalism ethical procedures relating to interaction with civilians.


PP201            Comparative & International Policing                    


Prerequisites: At least one 100 level course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course is designed to familiarize students with models of structure, strategies and interventions employed in various policing contexts. Course participants will be presented with various international organizational, managerial and tactical options with relevance – either for adaptation or as reference points – to the Pacific region. International policing models will be discussed from the standpoint of relevance to their specific organisational framework. International modifications to policing practices will also be examined to expose students to the concept of organisational changes within the policing context and the variables informing such strategic shifts.


PP202            Police & Society in the Pacific                                   


Prerequisites: At least one 100 level course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Police and Society in the Pacific is designed to expose students to issues impacting the relationship between police and the public, while charting the development of policing in specific Pacific contexts over time. The course provides a context for students to examine the most suitable strategies to action policing within Pacific communities. It highlights the need for careful negotiation of traditional practices and contemporary policing initiatives in an attempt to ensure balance between culture and context. The course also looks specifically at the adaptation of community policing practices within the Pacific region.


PP300            Action Research in a Police Context                       


Prerequisites: At least one 200 level course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course will expose students to formal processes of inquiry. It is designed to introduce participants to philosophies and methodologies specific to formulating an action plan intended to address an identified problem within the workplace. Students will be exposed to key areas relating to action research and provided with an opportunity to undertake activities geared towards demonstrating an understanding of the action research process.


PP301            Police Leadership & Command Management


Prerequisites: PP202

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course will expose students to theoretical and operational models of police leadership and command structures. It will provide a context for the discussion of ideas specific to resource coordination and responses to a range of policing functions. Emphasis is placed on a wide range of leadership and command issues including but not limited to the examination of perspectives relating to the multifaceted role of police commanders, various leadership contexts in policing, resource planning and management, crime demographics and issues of security.


PP302            Ethical Dimensions in Policing                                  


Prerequisites: PP202

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course will expose students to theoretical and professional notions about ethics within policing. Building upon introductory principles examined in PP101, students will develop an understanding of a broad spectrum of expectations and standards specific to police professionalism, codes of conduct and ethical practices. The course will explore the nuances of policing in a democracy, while also examining ideas of ethics as a requirement of professional practice and the mechanisms necessary for monitoring acceptable ethical policing practices.


PP404            Border Management & the Security Context      


Prerequisites: Entry to programme

Trimester 1: O at C                      Trimester 2: Not offered                    Trimester 3: Not offered

This course will present advanced-level investigative and interior enforcement aspects of immigration and border security. It will examine key legislation and policies that govern international border control and immigration, and how these can impact the various aspects of border management. Participants will explore issues of modernization and the use of intelligence within the border security and immigration context. The course will also prepare participants to critically evaluate the formulation and implementation of immigration and border security policy that involve the complex integration of various factors.


PP405            Ethical Issues in Leadership & Command             


Prerequisites: Entry to programme

Trimester 1: Not offered            Trimester 2: O at C                              Trimester 3: Not offered

Ethics are an important dimension of security provision and are critical to demonstrating transparency and accountability at the individual and organizational level. This unit is intended to explore issues relating to personal as well as professional conduct that influence individual’s decision making at different levels within the organization. Course participants will focus on the consequences of ethical leadership, unethical decision making and the adopting of an ethical organizational climate. They will also be exposed to ideas about dealing with ethical challenges such as misconduct and corrupt practices, while demonstrating adherence to organisational policy and ethical culpability in their operations.


PP406            Border Security Intelligence & the International Security Environment   


Prerequisites: Entry to programme

Trimester 1: Not offered             Trimester 2: Not offered                    Trimester 3: O at C

This course is intended to expose participants to theories and processes of intelligence–led practises to help them better understand the changing dynamics of border security in an international environment. It will focus on key concepts in border security intelligence, methodologies of intelligence gathering and analysis, the intelligence cycle, and analysis of applied intelligence in investigations and detections. A context will also be provided to explore distinguishing characteristics of an intelligence-led approach to border security and its impact on operations.


PP407            International Cooperation, Partnership & the Border Security Context                  


Prerequisites: Entry to programme

Trimester 1: O at C                      Trimester 2: Not offered                    Trimester 3: Not offered

This course will prepare participants to examine collaborations between security agencies as critical to border protection, peacekeeping and the preservation of law and order. It will expose participants to theories about international deployment, amalgamation and capability building initiatives within their own and other organizations. It will also explore the realities of international border security including its challenges, transformational capabilities, frameworks of cooperation, personnel reintegration and the role of international peace keeping bodies.


PS101            Introduction to Psychology


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the science of behaviour, what people do and why. It also looks at major approaches within the discipline of psychology ranging from how we perceive our surroundings and persons within it, to how we learn to think, feel and act. The course also aims to foster an appreciation of how the study of psychology may be useful to you in day-to-day situations.


PS102            Developmental Psychology


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

Developmental psychology covers life-span development from conception to end-of-life and aims to facilitate a better-informed understanding of oneself and those around us by drawing on Pacific and Euro-Western perspectives. Topics include cognitive and social development, social development, and the interplay between physiological characteristics and the environmental factors in development. Developmental psychology is relevant to a range of disciplines from psychology and education to human development.


PS103            Research Methods and Analysis for Social Sciences 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course introduces students to the basics of designing and developing research in the social sciences. The emphasis is on gaining an understanding of the main concepts and ethical considerations of research and gaining basic skills in research. The course offers an overview of qualitative and quantitative methods relevant to psychology and the social sciences. It is a core course for all psychology students, and a relevant course for students in a range of BA programmes.


PS107            Approaches to Social Psychology


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

Note: Formerly PS307

This course introduces students to the core topic areas in social psychology. It looks at how the social world differently impacts our thinking, relationships and actions. Students will be given a basic understanding of how scientific research is used to develop and evaluate social psychological theories. By learning how psychology explains human social behaviour, students can explore applications of this in resolving social issues relevant to the Pacific context.


PS203            Psychological Research Methods and Analysis 2


Prerequisites: PS103 and PS101

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course builds on previous knowledge and skills introduced in PS103 by developing students knowledge of quantitative methods. The course introduces basic inferential statistics and gives students a chance to practice analysing and interpreting psychological data. Students will continue to develop skills in developing research questions relevant to the Pacific and writing scientific reports. This course is a required for psychology major students and would be of use to students from other disciplines interested in post graduate research.


PS205            Cognitive Psychology


Prerequisites: PS103 and either PS101 or PS102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Cognitive processes are at the core of all psychological functioning. The course offers an overview of the various topics and main themes in cognitive psychology. Historical and philosophical antecedents of constructs and issues will be discussed, as well as practical implications of cognitive psychology theory and research.


PS206            Cross-cultural Psychology                                          


Prerequisites: PS103 and either PS101 or PS102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Cross-cultural psychology is the study of human behaviour across cultural groups. It considers the limitations of traditional mainstream psychological knowledge and covers a wide range of topics in psychology. The course considers both etic (universal principles) and emic (culture-specific) psychological knowledge and seeks to develop a better understanding of the main issues typically examined in cross-cultural psychological theory and research.


PS303            Psychological Research Methods and Analysis 3


Prerequisites: PS203

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course significantly expands on the quantitative background established in PS203. This course will provide the conceptual and analytical tools necessary to comprehend real world data sets, which are multivariate and complex. Students will learn about advanced quantitative research designs and analyses through examples from wider published research and collected datasets relevant to psychology in the Pacific context. This deeper understanding of quantitative methods will assist students entering a range of professional fields in identifying meaningful from meaningless/baseless claims, which is a necessary skill for combating misinformation in general.


PS304            Psychology of Personality and Individual Differences


Prerequisites: PS203, and either PS205 or PS206

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course examines the field of individual differences within psychological science. Specifically, the structure and development of our individual personality constructs and intelligence. The course provides an overview of the major paradigms used in personality theory and considers their practical and cultural implications. Students will also gain an introductory understanding of personality and intelligence testing, and how psychometric assessments can be used in a range of settings. The course is recommended for students of psychology and those interested in human resources, education, and counselling fields.


PS305            Psychology of Individual and Community Health


Prerequisites: PS203, PS205

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

The course draws on three sub-disciplines: health psychology (emphasising biopsychosocial causes of health and illness, epidemiology and risk factors; illness prevention, education, models of health behaviour and health promotion including implications for health care policy development and delivery); community psychology (ecological perspectives, empowerment and the social environment); and cross-cultural psychology (cultural influences on health beliefs and behaviours). The course emphasises the importance of the psychosocial ecology of people living in communities and the factors influencing health and illness. The course also includes important issues like health behaviour change (community health education), illness prevention strategies, and applications of non-clinical treatments.


PS306            Cognitive Neuropsychology                                      


Prerequisites: PS203, PS205

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Our behaviour and psychological processes are rooted in biological mechanisms common to all humans. Therefore, it is important to understand how the brain and nervous system work in order to support people living with traumatic bring injuries (such as sports concussions) and disease (such as Alzheimer’s and dementia). This course begins by teaching students about the brain’s structure and function, describing how ‘neurons’ (brain cells) communicate to produce ever-more complex behaviours and cognitive processes. The second half of the course discusses how impairments in the nervous system, both from developmental (e.g., Alzheimer’s, dementia) and environmental (e.g., traumatic head injuries) sources, contribute to neurocognitive disorders.


PS314            Applying Psychology in the Pacific                          


Prerequisites: PS203, PS205, or PS206

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2 B at C

The course aims to introduce students to the different areas of professional psychology (beyond counselling which is covered in its own course) and makes students aware of how they can use their psychological knowledge in the real world, especially in the Pacific context. Combined with this knowledge element, the course will allow students to pursue a practical project applying psychology to the Pacific and pitching solutions and interventions to a social or industry issue of their choice.  This course is recommended for students wishing to pursue a career in professional psychology or related fields.


PS402            Advanced Cross-cultural Psychology                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course utilises USP`s unique position in the South Pacific to generate a better understanding of theoretical and practical issues relating to cross-cultural psychology. It reviews major similarities and differences in behaviour across cultures, examines selected strategies relevant to cross-cultural research, and then considers research findings relevant to four areas: (i) organisation and work;(ii) communication and training; (iii) health behaviour; and (iv) national development and indigenous psychologies.


PS407            Clinical & Counselling Assessment                         


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course surveys several aspects of psychological assessment from an integrative scientist-practitioner model. Evidence based methods for developing and selecting psychometrically sound measures to study the mind and assess behavioural change are considered. Various categories of assessment will be covered including intelligence, educational, personality, career, and clinical diagnostic testing.  Students will apply knowledge of clinical and counselling assessment to the Pacific context based on cultural knowledge and critical evaluation of psychological research.


PS408            Clinical & Counselling Intervention                        


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course surveys several approaches to clinical and counselling intervention. The focus is on psychotherapy theory and core principles of evidence based practice for the treatment of diverse populations. Various theoretical orientations are analysed from an integrative scientist-practitioner model including psychodynamic, person-centered and cognitive-behavioral. Students will apply multicultural and ethical perspectives to issues affecting service delivery and intervention response in the Pacific region.


PS600F          Psychology SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                                        

PS600P          Psychology SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                                                                               

PS700F          Psychology Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                  

PS700P          Psychology Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                 

PS750F          Psychology DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                        

PS750P          Psychology DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                       

PS800F          Psychology PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                           

PS800P          Psychology PhD Thesis (Part-Time)  



SO100           Themes & Perspectives in Sociology


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme or approval of Head or nominee

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

In this course students will gain some initial understanding of the development and structure of society as viewed by sociologists, together with a preliminary understanding of sociological approaches and concepts (to be built on further in SO122 and SO200). There will be special, but not exclusive, attention to Pacific societies.


SO122           Classical Sociological Theories & Methodologies


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

This course aims to show the underpinnings of classical sociological theories as well as the philosophical and methodological problems faced by sociologists in their attempts to understand and explain social phenomena. By critically examining the work of such key sociologists as Durkheim, Weber, Marx, and C. Wright Mills, the course attempts to generate greater understanding of researchable issues facing contemporary society as well as how to gather objective data on them. The course is a pre-requisite for higher level sociology courses.


SO200           Modern Social Theory                                                 


Prerequisites: SO100 or SO122

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course expands on the theoretical concepts and themes covered in SO100 and SO122  and gives special emphasis to the examination of the concept of modernity and its implications for social analysis and research. It traces the attempts made by 20th (and 21st)-century social thinkers to expand, refine and further develop the legacies of classical social theories and assesses their relevance in the contexts of the Pacific Island societies.


SO201           Society, Culture & Change in the Pacific


Prerequisites: SO100 or approval of Head or nominee

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

From sociological and anthropological perspectives this course critically examines ‘society’, ‘culture’, ‘tradition’ and ‘change’ as contested notions. It critically explores tensions and dynamics between perceptions and representations of the ‘traditional’, ‘modern’ and ‘western’ in relation to processes of change within Pacific Island societies. The course discusses Pacific Islander cosmologies, religious beliefs, ritual, space and place. It discusses how individual and communal agency and Pacific Island beliefs, histories and cultures interlink with wider national, regional and global processes in nation-building, national identity, religious nationalism, tourism, the environment, climate change and early and contemporary patterns of migration.


SO207           Families, Sexuality & Change in the Pacific


Prerequisites: SO100 or SO122

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

From sociological and anthropological perspectives this course critically examines vital and challenging contemporary issues in Pacific Island societies. These include marriage, family life and childhood; masculinities; gender violence; youth, authority and the culture of silence; youth mental health and suicide; alternative sexualities; HIV/AIDS; sex work; family health, consumerism and Non Communicable Diseases. Contested notions of ‘culture’ and ‘tradition’, tensions and dynamics between what is perceived as ‘traditional’ and ‘modern’, and the shifting power relations between sociocultural structures and practices are critically analysed. Individual and communal agency is critically analysed as interconnected with historically situated local, national, regional and global processes.


SO212           Race & Ethnicity


Prerequisites: SO100 or SO122

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

Ideas about race and ethnicity influence how we answer questions about who am I, who are we, how we treat difference.  We examine the how and why of this influence, and its consequences for living in diverse societies.  What shapes racial and ethnic relations? How are social inequalities and political conflicts organized along racial and/or ethnic lines?  How do other categories of difference (class, sexuality, gender, indigeneity) intersect with race and ethnicity? How can civic conflict be mitigated in the context of plurality and diversity? We examine these questions by focusing on race and ethnicity in Oceania and elsewhere.


SO300           Research Methods in Sociology


Prerequisites: SO200 and any other sociology 200 level course

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

In this course students will engage with: 1) Methodological approaches by which we manage the challenges of researching human interactions and actions, social structures and processes, and worldviews and perspectives; 2) Ethical questions in conducting sociological inquiry; 3) Processes by which research into socio-economic and political life is designed, developed and conducted; and 4) Qualitative and quantitative tools to analyse data collected in social research. By the end of the course, students will be able to apply research methodologies to design and conduct their own social research and critically evaluate the research they encounter in other social sciences and in the mass media.


SO301           Sociology of Public Policy & Administration


Prerequisites: SO200

Semester 1:Not offered                                                  Semester 2: O at C

This course examines the social dynamics and pressures that influence public policy and its administration. A theoretical introduction will deal with the role of the state in articulating and implementing public policies and their administration. It encourages students to select contemporary public policy issues and its administration in poverty, education, health, social welfare, economic development, gender, civil societies, and environment in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).”


SO303           Advanced Sociological Theory


Prerequisites: SO200

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

This course examines the moral, political and ideological implications of sociological theories.How are they linked to our social world? How can we use sociological theory to explain and improve the world we live in? Building on key theories examined in S0100, SO122 and S0200, this course will attempt to “liberate” sociological theory from its specialised, exclusivist and isolated tendencies and provide it a central place in public debates in relation to political, social, economic and ethical issues of our time. Students will explore in depth interventions made in such theoretical domains as Postmodernism, Postcolonial Theory, Jurgen Habermas, Critical Race Theory, Feminism, Queer Theory and the contributions made by Pacific sociologists.


SO304           Religion & Politics in Contemporary Society


Prerequisites: SO201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

SO304 traces the theoretical development of sociological and anthropological definitions and theories of religion. It links the centrality of religion in Pacific Island societies at everyday life and national political levels with wider interconnected regional and global processes. It discusses the increasing polarisation of progressive and fundamentalist views within and between the world religions; religion and social justice; secularisation, religion and the media, interreligious dialogue and reconciliation. Contested notions of ‘culture’ and ‘tradition’ and tensions and dynamics between what is perceived as ‘traditional’ and ‘modern’ are critically examined in relation to power relations in social and cultural processes. Contemporary individual and communal agency at local levels is critically analysed as interconnected with historically-situated local, national, regional and global processes.


SO311           Crime & Deviance


Prerequisites: Any 200 level course in SO, DG, SW, PP and LW

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

Popular discourses on crime and deviance often focus on ideas of good and evil individuals.  In this course, we critically question these discourses by looking at the socio-economic, cultural and political structures and processes in PICs which shape 1) how crime and deviance are defined and regulated by societies 2) why crimes and deviance are committed; and. 3) who are punished, how much and why.  We also examine the social and ethical implications of the answers to these questions in terms of both increasing safety and security, as well as reducing injustices in the criminal justice system in the PICs.


SO401           Sociological Theory                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The course will delve into the philosophical basis of the main currents in sociological theory and critically explore their relevance in providing an understanding of contemporary society and social problems. Additionally, the emergence of critical theory and its relationship to important aspects of the dominant sociological theories will be examined, together with a critical appraisal of postmodernism in current social thought.


SO408           Issues in Social & Public Policy                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores key issues, concepts, and theoretical elements of social and public policy process. The role of political-economic ideology, power and social position and their influence on social policy are considered. In addition, the role of the state and governments, interest groups, civil society and international actors will also be examined. The course also brings into focus, local Pacific examples of social and public policy debates and practices. The course requires students to apply knowledge and skills gained, in analysing a specific contemporary social/public policy issue in the Pacific.


SO409           Social Development                                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

Provision of human well-being and social needs is usually seen as a desirable goal of development. However, in many countries, contestations over the purposes, priorities and sequencing of development, have resulted in subordination of social development to economic growth imperatives. This course looks at competing paradigms, histories, and practices of development. It further critically analyses the causes, manifestations and effects of poverty and inequality, and their intersections with diversity, especially gender and ethnicity. It also considers appropriate action that various social sectors take in conjunction with larger global efforts to arrest the crises spawned by economic growth oriented development practices.


SO415           Contemporary Social Issues                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: O at C

While early 21st century has seen some progressive global responses in dealing with a myriad of human needs, the outcomes of contemporary development efforts continue to be a paradox of increasing economic prosperity for a few in the midst of multiple crisis of deepening inequality, environmental degradation, human rights abuses, and democratic deficits of governance institutions. Moreover, concern has increased over impacts of migration, tourism and tensions relating to race and ethnicity around the globe in recent years. This course examines these issues as well as the different policy and civic actions employed in confronting them.


SO600F         Sociology SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                            



SO600P         Sociology SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                         



SO700F         Sociology Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                     



SO700P         Sociology Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                   



SO750F         Sociology DRP (Full-Time)                                                                   



SO750P         Sociology DRP (Part-Time)                                                                                         



SO800F         Sociology PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                           



SO800P         Sociology PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                             

SW100          Introduction to Social & Community Work Practice


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

Students are introduced to social and community work theories and the fields of practice in social and community work practice. Students will be introduced to social work fields of practice across Oceania and globally.  These includes exploring models of practice used in social service agencies and related policies within government agencies, private sector, civil society organisations and non-governmental organisations.


SW101          Social Policy: An Introduction                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                  Semester 2: B at C

This course introduces social policy and underpinning theories at the global, regional, national and organizational levels as they relate to the UN Sustainable Development Goals and Pacific Regionalism.  Students will gain a basic understanding of political ideologies and how they shape policies, legislation and well-being.  They will also examine the implications of social policies and governance for different fields of practice as well as for project design and reporting.


SW200          Fieldwork Practice 1                                                    


Prerequisites: SW100

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

As a requirement of the social and community work practice component of the Social Work Major, students will work in an approved social and community work environment. The course aims to equip students with the practical skills and competencies required of professional social and community workers. Students will spend the maximum of 200 hours in a social and community work organisation supported by a Field educator and the Fieldwork Placement Coordinator.


SW201          Social & Community Work Practice 1


Prerequisites: SW100

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course critically analyses the skills and models of working with individuals, families and communities. An emphasis is placed on contextual and culturally appropriate ways of working with people in a variety of social and community work settings across Pacific Island nations.


SW300          Fieldwork Practice 2                                                    


Prerequisites: SW200

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

As a requirement of the social and community work practice component of the Social Work Major, students will work in an approved social and community work environment. The course aims to equip students with the practical skills and competencies required of professional social and community workers. Students will spend the maximum of 200 hours in a social and community work organisation supported by a Field educator and the Fieldwork Placement Coordinator.


SW301          Social & Community Work Practice 2                        


Prerequisites: SW201

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course allows students to critically apply theoretical knowledge on community development that draws on various social work models and methods of practice that follows professional and ethical standards.


SW312 (PS312)  Counselling Theory and Practice                                              


Prerequisites: Any SW 200 level or PS 200 level course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course aims to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in counselling by exploring relevant theoretical and practical themes. Students will learn about the various approaches to counselling and understand their strengths and weaknesses. In addition, students will learn the core skills of counselling and have a chance to reflect on how to develop these within their work. Finally, the course will discuss important issues in counselling practice including ethics, self-care and cultural perceptions with an emphasis on the application within Pacific notions of status and power and interpersonal communication.