School of Pacific Arts, Communication, and Education (SPACE)

Course Descriptions

Note: UU100 and UU114 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 200-level courses. UU200 and UU204 must be passed, in addition to prerequisite requirements,  before students progress to the 300-level courses. Only approved programmes may be exempt from this requirement.

 

Note: From 2019, course codes beginning with LL are replaced by new codes as follows:

CM     Cook Islands Māori

CN      Chinese

FJ       Fijian

FR      French

HN     Hindi

LN      Linguistics

LT       Literature

NU     Vagahau Niue

RT      Rotuman

TG      Tongan and Niuafo’ou

VA     Vanuatu Language Studies


AL400       Research Methodologies in the Humanities & Social Sciences


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1:     O at C (for Linguistics, Pacific Studies, Gender Studies, Education, Law, History, Psychology)

Semester 2:     O at C (for Linguistics, Fijian Language Studies, Pacific Studies, Gender Studies, Education, Law, Sociology, Social Policy & Administration)

This mandatory entry level postgraduate diploma course in the SPACE and SOLASS provides students with a blended generic and discipline-based training in research design and methodologies. It is a prerequisite course for students undertaking independent research at the postgraduate level in the humanities and social sciences and related discipline areas. The course delivers training in a range of generic transferable research skills, linking them to relevant research, pedagogical, epistemological and scholarship issues at the discipline level.

All students registering in Postgraduate programmes are required, in their first semester of studies, to complete 14.5 hours of Information Research Skills conducted by the Library.


CM101 (LL196)                   Conversational Cook Islands Māori


Prerequisites: None

Semester 1: F at CI                                                          Semester 2: F at CI

This course provides an introduction to Cook Islands Māori language and culture. It provides an overview of the basic pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary needed to understand and contribute to basic conversations, as well as providing an insight into the customs and culture of the Cook Islands. While focusing primarily on conversational language, attention will also be given to reading and writing in the language. The course is aimed at complete beginners, or those with very limited proficiency in the language.


CM111          Cook Islands Māori 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate programme AND proficiency in Cook Island Māori

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in Cook Islands Māori, and develops their awareness of the phonological, orthographic, lexical and morphosyntactic elements of the language. Students will develop an understanding of the historical and social context in which Cook Islands Māori is spoken, the different varieties of Māori spoken across the Cook Islands, and the extent to which the language has changed over time. Through the use of archival and online research, students will survey the tools and resources that currently exist in the language, and will learn to create contemporary materials using print-based and digital technologies.


CM211          Cook Islands Māori 2


Prerequisites: CM111

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2:  Not offered

This course seeks to build on the knowledge and skills gained in CM111 in a contemporary context, and has applications of immediate relevance to a range of work-related contexts. It seeks to enrich students’ Cook Islands Māori vocabulary and grammar, enabling them to interpret and produce texts of greater complexity and richness, and helping them to understand the relevance of purpose, audience and focus. It tackles elements of language knowledge that enable students to move from concrete to abstract concepts, from restricted to elaborate language, and from surface-level to deep critical engagement with texts.


CM212          The Teaching of Cook Islands Māori


Prerequisites: CM111

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Cook Islands Māori and its educational use across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way the language is taught in schools across the Cook Islands. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of Cook Islands Māori language and culture, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


CM311                                  Cook Islands Māori Texts & Translation                                       


Prerequisites: CM211 or CM212

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2:  Not offered

This course provides an advanced level study of Cook Islands Māori language and culture, focusing particularly on the practical work of generating new and complex texts in Cook Islands Māori about contemporary topics of local, national and global significance. It also provides a thorough grounding in the skills required for effective communication, the creation of new texts, and the translation of texts. These are transferable skills that can be applied in a range of sectors.


CM331          Cook Islands Māori Epistemology, Values, Ethics


Prerequisites: At least one 200 level course and proficiency in Cook Islands Māori

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2:  Not offered

This course extends and applies knowledge and skills previously developed in the programme to explore matters of epistemology and culturally-appropriate research methodologies. The course utilizes significant Cook Islands Māori language texts to explore Māori ways of knowing and knowledge production. At the end of the course, students will submit a bilingual text in Cook Islands Māori and English presenting the outcomes of a mini research project, informed by Cook Islands Māori epistemology and utilising Cook Islands Māori research methodologies.


CN101                                   Chinese Language 1


Prerequisites: Not to be taken by students with prior knowledge of Chinese

Semester 1: F at L, LTK, E & CI and O at C                 Semester 2: F at L, LTK, E & CI and O at C

The aim of this course is to introduce students to Chinese language studies. It is primarily designed to train students in conversational Chinese, but will involve other aspects of the language, such as vocabulary, grammar, listening, reading and writing. Students will be encouraged to draw on ideas they have been taught in other subjects. By the end of the course, they will develop the basic requirements for daily communication in Chinese.


CN201                                   Chinese Language 2                              


Prerequisites: CN101

Semester 1: F at L, LTK, E & CI and O at C                Semester 2: F at L, LTK, E & CI and O at C

This course builds on CN101 (LL181) and enables students to communicate with increasing confidence in the Chinese language. Students will be asked to speak about more intricate matters, such as their personal interests and travel plans. After learning the basic strokes, strokes orders and character composition rules, they will be able to recognise and to write complex characters. Chinese social customs and common expressions will be explained in class.


CN301                                   Chinese Language 3                              


Prerequisites: CN201

Semester 1: F at L, LTK, E & CI                                     Semester 2: F at L, LTK, E & CI

This advanced course will enable students to communicate in greater depth. By using an advanced range of vocabulary, students are expected to talk about more complicated topics, such as interests, plans and travelling. After learning the basic strokes, stroke orders and character composition rules, students will be able to recognise and write more complex characters. Chinese social customs, usual usage and common expressions will also be covered. On completion of this course, there will be opportunities to be assessed for the internationally – recognised Chinese proficiency test, HSK.


CN302                                   Chinese for Business                            


Prerequisites: CN201

Semester 1: F at L, LTK, E & CI                                     Semester 2: F at L, LTK, E & CI

Designed for students nearing graduation, this course introduces a broader range of topics and text types related to business. It provides students with knowledge and skills in Business Chinese and enables them to use Chinese with more confidence to fulfil more challenging tasks, emphasising the acquisition of skills and self-awareness, and the development of personal values. Each part of the course allows students to explore in context cultural aspects of Chinese at an advanced level and understand the way to behave in commercial situations. On completion, there will be opportunities to be assessed for the internationally-recognised Business Chinese Test, BST.


ED100           Social Science Education for Teaching in Primary School                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                                   Semester 2: Not offered

This course serves as an introduction to the basic concepts of the social sciences and will help prepare students teach social studies at primary and early secondary levels. The course uses a problem-solving approach in both content organisation and pedagogy, and the ‘problems’ identified for study will be derived from three major themes – Economy, Environment, and Society – underpinned by Culture. Knowledge and skills necessary for addressing selected problem situations will be sourced from the Social Sciences and Humanities, as well as Pacific Knowledge Systems, as appropriate. Students will be expected to develop skills in problem-solving and decision making.


ED103           Understanding Children & Childhood                                            


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                        Semester 2: O at C

This is the foundation course in the BEDECEC programme. This course is designed to prepare students understand and appreciate the changing perspectives of children and childhood from medieval to the contemporary time in varying socio-cultural contexts. It also assists teachers to understand their responsibilities as Early Childhood Education and Care practitioners in regards to the impact of these changes on ECEC philosophies/theories and practices. The course also provides relevant knowledge and skills for students to effectively respond to young children’s behaviour in any environment, whether they it be home or in early childhood education and care settings. This course has an embedded professional practice/observations within ECEC settings as well as in the mainstream early years’ school as a major part of assessment.


ED115           Numeracy Education for Teaching in Primary School                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: B at C

One of the aims of school mathematics is to develop students’ number sense, which concerns a level of comfortableness and familiarity with numbers. Number sense and flexible thinking about numbers are critical for meaningful and efficient mathematical computations. This course aims to create consciousness of these traits in teachers. It will help them to develop activities and strategies that build upon and promote number sense, and the ability to work flexibly with numbers. Developing teaching strategies that capitalise on the number knowledge that students bring to the learning situation and providing further activities in classifying, patterning and subitising will be important tasks. The course lays an important foundation for working with and teaching mathematics.


ED116           Science Education for Teaching in Primary School                                            


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Offered only as in country project

Semester 2: Offered only as in country project

The main focus of this course is on developing primary school teachers’ science content knowledge so that they can include science in their pupils’ work and also promote it through any curricular areas at the primary level. Specifically, this course aims at further developing teachers’ understanding of the following fundamental science concepts: 1. Particle theory of matter; 2. Changes: chemical and physical; 3. The cell, variation and classification; 4. Food, environment and human health; 5. Waves: light and sound; 6. Energy and forces; 7. Electricity and magnetism. Teachers who enrol in this course will learn about how to use inquiry strategies to understand these concepts.


ED150           Introduction to Teaching                                                                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                                   Semester 2: Not offered

This is the first course in the Certificate in Teaching program. It will introduce beginning teachers to key ideas in teaching and learning. The ideas will include the reasons for becoming a teacher, the role of a teacher, the aims of the schools, good teachers and the importance of being a reflective teacher. Questions such as: What makes a good teacher will invite discussions, reflections and assessments. Attention will also be given to different perceptions and categories of learning. Linking the teacher and student as well as teaching will be important. Activities will point towards the development of objectives and lesson planning in preparation for microteaching sessions.


ED152           Human Development: A Lifespan Approach                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                                   Semester 2: Not offered

This is a common core course for all teacher education undergraduate programmes. The course introduces students to the scientific study of human development across lifespan. The content focus on biological processes and underlying cognitive and emotional development from conception to old age. Developmental issues for individuals with special needs and disabilities are also included in this course plus the Pacific perspectives/views of human growth and development.


ED152FR       Le développement humain-Une approche sur toute une vie


Prérequis: Etre admis en preimier cycle universitaire

Semester 1: O at E                                                                   Semester 2: Not offered

Ce cours fait partie du tronc commun pour tous les programmes en sciences de l’éducation. Le cours représente une introduction à l’étude scientifique du développement humain au long de la vie. Le contenu est centré sur les processus sociaux, cognitifs et biologiques qui sont à la base du développement cognitif et émotionnel des individus, de la conception jusqu’à la vieillesse. Le cours prend aussi en considération les défis du développement des personnes handicapées ou à besoins spécifiques.


ED153           Education, Schooling & Society                                


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                        Semester 2: O at C

This is a common core course for all teacher education undergraduate programmes. The principal aim of this course is to establish a foundation by introducing students to a wider understanding of issues related to education, schooling and the society we live in. In the Pacific, education in the form of schooling has influenced the lives of people, thus the focus of the course is on issues that have a marked effect on society. As a common core course, ED153 Education and Society will be taken by all teacher trainees and is useful for those who intend to work in Pacific schools and educational contexts. The course provides the necessary background knowledge to understand the Pacific region and its peoples, their ways of learning, knowing and doing.


ED153FR       Education et socié té                                                   


Prérequis: Etre admis en preimier cycle universitaire

Semester 1: Not offered                                                         Semester 2: O at E

Ce cours fait partie du tronc commun pour tous les programmes en sciences de l’éducation. L’objectif principal du cours est de fournir aux étudiants les notions de base pour une meilleure compréhension des problématiques qui relient l’éducation, l’école et la société actuelle. Dans le Pacifique, l’introduction de l’éducation scolaire a influencé la vie de tous les jours et le cours se concentre donc sur l’impact de l’éducation sur la société. Faisant partie du tronc commun, le cours est obligatoire pour tous les enseignants stagiaires et il est utile pour ceux qui ont l’intention de travailler dans les écoles du Pacifique et dans des milieux d’enseignement. Le cours couvre les connaissances nécessaires pour comprendre la région et ses habitants, leurs croyances et leurs coutumes et la façon dont ils apprennent en société.


ED154           Introduction to Assessment & Evaluation                                                                          


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  Not offered                                                        Semester 2: P at C

This is an introductory course in educational assessment. It introduces students to assessment, its purposes and roles. Students will have the opportunities to: (i) explore the purposes of assessing student performance, (2) develop and evaluate learning objectives, (3) plan for formative and summative assessment tasks, (4) develop various assessing tools and techniques, (5) interpret assessment data and (6) investigate Pacific ways of doing assessment.


ED158           Introduction to Non-Formal Education                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

This course enables students to develop an ideological base for non-formal education practices. It also examines terms and concepts in relation to current programmes in non-formal education in the South Pacific and the decision-making process of government and non-government organisations.


ED170           English Language for Teachers                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

This is an introductory course in language and literacy that helps teachers become more aware of language, what it is, and how it works in society. The course looks at social and cultural patterns of language and the changes in language over decades. It also introduces teacher trainees and untrained teachers to designing lessons on the teaching of language in the 21st century and how to innovate teaching strategies for reading, writing, listening and speaking so that they are aware of the important skills needed for teaching in these key areas of language learning.


ED180           Human Movement and Culture in the Pacific     


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  B at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores the unique sports, games, dances, and movement experiences used to celebrate the various cultures of the Pacific Island Countries. Students will compare the historical and cultural meanings in each of the various movement types and will be able to teach games and dances from the Pacific. In addition, they will be able to celebrate the richness of Pacific culture and history through physical activity, and incorporate these into quality physical education lessons. This course will also enable students to lead and sustain a range of Pacific Island movement experiences whilst maintaining the appropriate levels of cultural sensitivity and authenticity.


ED183           Swimming & Aquatic Safety                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  B at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course teaches students the techniques of survival and competitive swimming strokes and basic aquatic rescue skills. The course requires students to demonstrate various water rescue skills necessary for supervising young people in open and closed water aquatic environments. The course also requires students to plan and deliver relevant and meaningful aquatic experiences using appropriate pedagogies. The course features a strong practical component and students are expected to participate in practical activities in a pool (where possible) and open water activities including canoeing and snorkelling.


ED184           Outdoor Education and Leisure                                                                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  B at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course will explore experiential learning theory from practical and applied perspectives in outdoor recreation and leisure activities. Students will plan a series of outdoor adventure activities that nurture high quality learning experiences for school-aged students. Specifically, students will explore both the hard and soft skills affiliated with outdoor education and the multiple domains of learning impacted by these tasks. Students will be required to participate in a field trip and apply theoretical and practical experience to create a series of adventure activities and an outdoor education experience for school aged students.


ED191           Educational Decision-Making & Problem-Solving                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

This introductory course on educational leadership examines decision-making and problem-solving at system-level and school-level in developing countries with a special focus on the small island developing states in the Pacific. The primary aim of this course is to develop knowledge and skills in sound decision-making and problem-solving. This course will help you to acquire suitable knowledge, skills and values to professionally lead and manage educational organisations in a variety of settings in the region and beyond to achieve better educational outcomes.


ED192           Educational Project Planning                                    


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: B at C

This is an introductory course in educational project planning which examines the formulation, appraisal, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of educational projects, programmes and plans. The course also provides for small-scale, school based and community based formal and non-formal education projects. These may be of relevance to you if you are a teacher, a community worker or even a concerned citizen. All educational projects must be seen as policy experiments that help continuous development.


ED204           Social Competence & Emotional Health in Young Children


Prerequisites: ED103

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

Social competence and emotional health are important aspects of young children’s growth and development. This course allows students to have in depth knowledge and skills of social competence and emotional health so they can support young children achieve the recognisable milestones needed and also able to offer psychosocial support in times of emergencies. This course includes an analytic and reflective professional experience with young children as a major part of assessment.


ED205           Programme Planning & Curriculum Integration in Early Childhood Education & Care


Prerequisites: ED103

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the importance of programme planning including the theory and practice of curriculum and curriculum integration in ECEC. Planning will focus on curriculum integration using the trans-disciplinary approach through inquiry-based learning. Students will learn the suitability of a theme and then choose a topic that will transcend across all areas of curriculum, anticipates the needs of children involved, plan for first-hand experience, support children’s investigation and representations and document and evaluate the learning that is occurring. This course includes an analytic professional experience with young children in early childhood settings and early years mainstream school.


ED206           Creative Arts in Early Childhood Education & Care


Prerequisites: ED103

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

In this course students will examine the importance of creative arts in the learning development of young children particularly in relation to the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. Creative arts in the form of arts, crafts, drama, music and movement are explored in detail where knowledge, skills, interests, and talents of the children are tapped and further developed for future sustainability. This course includes an analytic embedded early childhood professional experience within early childhood centres and in the early Years 1, 2 and 3 in the mainstream schools as a major part of assessment.


ED209           Educating Individuals with Vision Impairments                                                 


Prerequisites: ED152

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: P at C

This course is a core course in the Bachelor of Education (Special and Inclusive Education). People with vision impairments are numerous in the Pacific and their conditions are quite often undetected until it is too late to help them to achieve their potential or to save their sight. Children’s vision problems are often undetected, which causes them to have difficulties accessing the curriculum, leading to school failure. Identification procedures and educational programming/strategies for working with these students are also addressed in ED209.


ED210           Educating Individuals with Behaviour Disorders                                               


Prerequisites: ED152

Semester 1:  P at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course will focus on students with emotional and behavioural disorders. Teaching strategies and technologies used for specific behavioural areas such as ADD and ADHD, shy, withdrawn, conduct disorders, autism, emotionally disturbed and some mental health conditions encountered in children in general in Pacific Island Countries will be discussed. Influences that affect students’ behaviour such as parenting style, child abuse, and issues affecting family functioning will be examined also. Issues that affect Pacific people such as advocacy, lack of awareness, reporting procedures for child abuse, child counselling, facilities available which are currently in place to cater for this group, as well as professional ethics, confidentiality and networking will also be covered.


ED215           Mathematics Education Primary 1


Prerequisites: ED115

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course extends teachers’ understanding of the nature of mathematics, helps them assess the way mathematics is typically taught, compares learning and doing mathematics, and inculcates the notion of thinking and working mathematically. The algebraic processes introduce the disposition to use mathematics to solve problems and tasks in a logical manner that is based on mathematical principles. The topics in the course are important for primary teachers as they enable reflection on current methods of teaching mathematics, and add sufficient depth to their mathematical knowledge as well as new teaching methods.


ED216           Science & Social Studies for Primary Teachers


Prerequisites: ED116 or equivalent

Semester 1: O at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course has two components: science and social studies. It is assumed that most students would have taught science and social studies in primary schools in the Pacific region. Each of the two course components comprise five study units with each unit focusing on how concepts that are fundamental to understanding both science and social studies could be effectively learnt and taught in the Pacific classroom. The Science component focuses on: the nature of science, science as inquiry, constructivism and learning science, the living environment, science and technology, and interdisciplinary teaching science. The Social Studies component focuses on Society and learning, governance, change, conflict resolution, and cultural differences.


ED217           Literacy Processes


Prerequisites: ED170

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course builds on ED170 (Language for Techers) and it describes the various meanings of literacy in different cultural contexts. Students are expected to develop strategic activities to promote language literacy across the curriculum.   It aims to develop and enhance teachers’ abilities in designing and conducting effective procedures to promote literacy in their classrooms. This course covers literacy in L1 and L2 developments, reading, writing, listening and oral language processes, language across the curriculum, grammar and language structure, library, genres, cross cultural issues and monitoring literacy. Intervention programs in reading and writing for children with learning difficulties are also learnt in this course.


ED250           Curriculum & Pedagogy 1                                           


Prerequisites: ED152, ED153 and All 100 level core courses from subject majors

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course is based on the principle of constructivism and covers four modules: The Effective Teacher, Teaching Contexts and Challenges, Strategies for Effective Teaching and Learning, and Teachers as Professionals. Using a mixed-mode teaching approach, this course aims to enhance the foundational pedagogical knowledge, technological skills, and good attributes that will guide teachers towards a successful and rewarding period of practice teaching. Students also learn a variety of generic teaching skills such as planning, instruction, assessment and classroom management.


ED250FR       Elements de didactique 1


Prérequis: ED152 et ED153

Semester 1:  O at E                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

Renforcer les connaissances pédagogiques de base, les compétences technologiques et les vertus qui mènent vers une carrière réussie et enrichissante dans l’enseignement. Les étudiants vont également développer leurs compétences pédagogiques générales comme la planification, l’instruction, l’évaluation et la gestion de classe.


ED252           Educational Psychology & the Teaching–Learning Process


Prerequisites: ED152

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

This course aims to provide a theoretical and practical framework within which learners may identify the different theories  describing the underlying psychological processes of teaching and learning. In particular, the knowledge that student teachers attain in this course may equip them with an understanding of how the psychological processes of teaching and learning may apply to the classroom contexts in the South Pacific.


ED252FR       Psychopédagogie et le processus d’enseignement- apprentissage


Prérequis: ED152

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

Ce cours permet aux étudiants de se familiariser avec l’étude du processus d’apprentissage chez les humains dans différents milieux éducatifs. Son objectif est d’équiper les étudiants avec les notions nécessaires pour comprendre les questions, les problèmes et les recherches sous-jacents aux différents aspects de la psychopédagogie. Le cours inclut une analyse des aspects psychopédagogiques dans l’éducation des enfants préscolaires et des personnes aux besoins spécifiques.


ED254           Evaluation in Schools


Prerequisites: ED154

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

This course provides opportunities for developing practice-based theories and models of teaching and evaluation. It adopts a unique approach for developing practical knowledge strategies in teacher practices with special reference to classroom teaching, organising and monitoring learning, and to reviewing institutional curricula. The course emphasises teachers as practitioner-researchers of their own everyday practices, including organising and monitoring learning. Attention is drawn towards the role of teaching as a reflective practice in action. This course includes the process and use of readily available data for decision making.


ED255           Introduction to Curriculum Development


Prerequisites: ED152 and ED153

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

This courses introduces students to curriculum theory and practice and provides the learning opportunity to develop an awareness and understanding of the processes of curriculum planning, development, implementation, assessment, evaluation and change. This course will help students to understand the concept and role of curriculum in education. It also provides foundational skills in curriculum mapping, identifying curriculum gaps, designing and evaluating the curriculum.


ED258           Adult Learning                                                               


Prerequisites: ED158

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

This course builds on the principles and conceptual understanding of non-formal education and focuses on the core learning principles that apply to adult learners. It aims to contribute to a deep understanding  of the psychology of adult learning and explores techniques used in facilitation of adult education programmes.


ED262           Inclusive Education & Diverse Learning Needs   


Prerequisites: ED152

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

The course focuses on Goal #4 (Quality Education) of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and will be underpinned by a right-based approach and the social model (informed by the medical model). The aim is to ensure that inclusive and equitable, quality education with opportunities for all is understood within the local Pacific Contexts. This includes examining the diverse developmental learning needs of learners along a continuum including children who experience learning difficulties, emotional and behavioral difficulties, sensory impairments, physical impairments and those who may be gifted and talented. Principles of inclusion are applied to educational practice in collaboration with families, professionals and community organisations.


ED286           Health, Wellness and Fitness


Prerequisites: At least one 100 level course

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: Not Offered

This course explores the health, wellness, and fitness related sciences and how these can be used to build health and physical literacy in young people. Students will assess principles of health and skill-related fitness in young people as well as assess health and physical literacy using established guidelines and protocols. Students also will apply principles of social, physical, psychological, and cognitive learning to improve the physical and health literacy of the young people they interact with. As part of their studies, students will examine trends in health data of Pacific Island populations and critique current public health interventions. This course will enable students to assess principles of health, wellness and skill-related fitness in young people, and critique Pacific Island public health interventions.


ED287           Sport Education and Coaching


Prerequisites Admission into undergraduate program

Semester 1:B at C                                                            Semester 2 Not offered

In this course students explore the Sports Education Model that they are expected to learn and perform in a diversity of sporting roles. Students are expected to apply their understandings of seasons, affiliation, sporting festivity, record keeping, practice design, and culminating events to promote participation of young people in organised sports. Students will also investigate the principles of Olympism and Values-based Education through sport. This course will also investigate case-studies of when sport has been used for peace-building and sustainable development. This course has a practical component where students plan, teach and evaluate a sport education lesson.


ED289           Teaching Games for Understanding (previously Physical & Leisure Education 2)


Prerequisites: Admission into undergraduate program 

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course investigates games-centred physical education pedagogies. Specifically, students of this course will explore the theoretical origins and applications of the Teaching Games for Understanding Model. Students undertaking this course will acquire a deep understanding of the Fundamental Rules of Games and application of the Games Classification System in both physical education and coaching contexts. Students are expected to be able to apply this knowledge in simulated teaching/coaching practises. Finally, students must be able to demonstrate how they will plan and teach games using improvised and/or limited equipment.


ED291           School Organisation & Management


Prerequisites: ED191

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course is designed to provide students  with the knowledge and capabilities of school organisation and management. It covers themes of educational leadership that deals with the nature of school administration, organising the work of atff members, instructional leadership, management, aligning the school with the community, accountability and the responsiveness of educational leaders.


ED292           Educational Planning & Development


Prerequisites: ED191 or ED192

Semester 1:  Not offered                                               Semester 2: O at C

The course builds on planning concepts learnt and skills developed in ED191 and ED192. It deals with educational planning and development processes at different levels (school, local, district, national) in educational context in Pacific Island countries. The course will provide students with the knowledge and skills on planning and development including; diagnosing, mapping, costing, feasibility testing, formulation, implementation and evaluation of plans and systems. An important feature of the course is to introduce educational change appropriate for developing contexts.


ED300           Practicum


Prerequisites:      All 100-level and all 200-level courses in your programme plus ED350 (Students in BEDECEC, BEDPRIM and BEDSIE programmes are exempted from ED350) Note: BEDECEC students must complete all the 300-level ECEC specific courses before they can do ED300

Semester 1:  O at C                                                         Semester 2: O at C

It is a course on school practicum for pre-service and in-service in BEDECEC, BEDSIE, BEDPRM, and BEDSEC. It is the capstone course for the undergraduate programmes. Students are expected to complete a 17-week school practicum in their respective programmes. The comprehensive practicum package provides the necessary teacher competencies, professional attributes, knowledge and skills that are needed in teachers in the 21st century. For preservice, the 17 weeks are spread over three blocks as per the new practicum structure. Year 1 (no practicum); Year 2 (three-week home-based practicum); Year 3 (three-week practicum); Year 4 (ED300: eleven-week practicum for preservice, and fourteen-week practicum for in-service).


ED300FR       Stage de pratique accompagnee


Prérequis: (Les étudiants inscrits en licence en éducation de la petite enfance, en enseignement du premierdegré ou en enseignement spécialisé et inclusif sont dispensés du cours ED350FR)

Semester 1:  O sur C                                                       Semester 2: O sur C

Ce cours est un stage pratique au sein de vraies écoles, à destination des enseignants en formation, tout comme des enseignants en service. C’est l’aboutissement de tous les programmes d’études de premier cycle en sciences de l’éducation. Les étudiants doivent effectuer un stage de 17 semaines en école. Le stage est conçu de façon à fournir les compétences, les attributs  professionnels, les connaissances et les habiletés nécessaires pour être un bon enseignant. Notez que le stage aura une nouvelle structure à partir de 2018 : les 17 semaines seront réparties en trois blocs, 3 semaines en 2e année, 3 semaines en 3e année, et 11 semaines en 4e année


ED302           Play Pedagogies in Early Childhood Education & Care


Prerequisites: All 200-level ECEC specific courses ED204, ED205 and ED206

Semester 1:  Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Play is important in young children’s growth and development. It provides an entry point for educators to critically define play and playful curriculum from the eyes of young children and from an educational play pedagogical perspective. Adults’ role in scaffolding young children’s play is vital in bridging young children’s learning from one level to the next. The course includes an analytic and a reflective embedded professional practice as a major part of assessment.


ED303           Health, Safety & Nutrition in Early Childhood


Prerequisites: Any 200 level ECEC course (ED204 or ED205 or ED206)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course explores the various factors that influence the development of physically and psychologically healthy and safe lifestyles, which are critical to the education of today’s infants, toddlers and young children, including those with special needs. The responsibility of the teachers, caregivers, parents and communities in developing healthy attitudes and lifestyles for the young through movement development, physical fitness, nutrition, hygiene and safety in the early childhood learning environment is emphasised. The course has a practical component assessment task in selected early childhood settings including the early years mainstream schools.


ED304           Families & Communities in Early Childhood Education and Care


Prerequisites: All 200-level ECEC specific courses ED204, ED205 and ED206

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the importance of families and communities in the learning development of young children. Partnership and the interconnections amongst relevant systems also play a vital role in the further development of young children for example the wellbeing of children in terms of health, safety and nutrition. The course explores why and how the world has changed and how educational settings such as ECEC could be a source of retaining sustainable practices that could be embedded in the learning journey. The ideas of social justice play a crucial role in children’s environment through better and inclusive policies that would enable things happen in more meaningful ways. Students are expected to engage in a mini analytical research with families and communities within their sociocultural context as a major part of assessment.


ED323           Educating Individuals with Physical/Multiple/Health Impairments


Prerequisites: Any 200 level Education courses

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: P at C

This course is a core course in the Bachelor of Education (Special Education), and will enable students to include children with physical, multiple and health impairments across the curriculum. Students will develop positive attitudes, knowledge, skills and strategies to enable them to work with this group as well as with their caregivers and promote awareness and advocacy in the PIN communities. Use and care of basic equipment for this group will be an area of focus.


ED325           Mathematics Education Primary 2


Prerequisites: ED215 or equivalent

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course focuses on strengthening teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge by analysing typical methods of teaching the major primary mathematics topics such as the systems of measurement, geometric figures and geometric motions, chance and data probability. Teachers will be encouraged to investigate students’ understanding of different contexts on which to build learning. The course will investigate new assessment practices in primary mathematics, provide practice in developing good resources, practise integrated teaching and manage multi-classes. The activities will add depth to teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge, enhance their understanding of students’ common mistakes, and increase their confidence in teaching mathematics.


ED327           Literacy Processes 2


Prerequisites: ED217

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This is the final language education course in the BED Primary program. It focuses on developing teachers’ understanding and skills in literacy processes in particular in English as a second language (ESL) context of the Pacific. Teachers who do this course are expected to be knowledgeable about the educational and language policies in their countries and be able to envisage creative patterns of teaching and learning in the English language at the primary school level.  It features literacy processes and the development of the major language skills in other subjects across the curriculum. The course also explore the processes of oral language development, reading, and writing and how these processes translate to teaching pedagogies. It examines inclusivity in literacy achievements, cultural, multiple and critical literacies in the development of teaching and learning  of language skills in primary schools.


ED328           Social Science Education 2


Prerequisites: ED216

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course focuses specifically on critical issues such as the impact of the outside world on Pacific cultures, environmental and cultural sustainability of Pacific Islands, gender issues, overpopulation of urban centres, crime, social justice and human rights. Students will use the problem-based approach to investigate major social and environmental issues facing Pacific societies and the world. Students will develop research and analytical skills, at the same time valuing participatory and group approaches to learning and problem solving.


ED336           Science Education Primary 2


Prerequisites: ED216

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course promotes the idea of epistemological pluralism and the notion of science as human enterprise particularly in Pacific Island cultures. It investigates the challenges of teaching and learning science in the non-Western classroom and highlights misconceptions that arise in science and learning science. In turn, the course provides opportunities for teachers to consider our traditional ways of explaining natural phenomena and processes such as traditional medicine, medicine, navigation, and fishing.


ED350           Curriculum & Pedagogy 2


Prerequisites: ED250 and ED252 (not to be taken by ECEC, Primary and SIE students)

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course is a core course and the second of two teaching-methods courses in the teacher education programmes. The course builds on the themes and content covered in ED250. It explores the unique nature of a variety of teaching areas or disciplines and emphasises appropriate pedagogical-content knowledge that will enable students to teach their specialised subject areas effectively. During teaching workshops in the different subject areas, students will practice ways to infuse new ideas into teaching and effectively ground practice in sound educational theories.


ED350FR       Eléments de didactique 2                                           


Prérequis: ED250. Pas disponible en option.

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at E

Pas disponible en option. Ce cours s’inscrit également dans le tronc fondamental et il est le dernier des deux cours sur les pratiques de l’enseignement. Le cours renforce les thèmes et les contenus abordés dans ED250. Il examine le caractère unique de plusieurs disciplines et met l’accent sur des connaissances pédagogiques adaptées au contenu pour permettre aux étudiants d’enseigner leur discipline. A travers des ateliers d’enseignements dans les différentes disciplines, les étudiants s’exerceront à élaborer des idées nouvelles pour la classe et à ancrer leur pratique d’enseignement dans des théories pédagogiques solides


ED354           Assessing  Student Learning


Prerequisites: ED252 OR ED154 OR ED254

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course focusses on assessments typically designed and used by the classroom teacher. It aims to help students understand the important role that assessment plays in classroom instruction and how teachers can teach better by putting assessments at the fore of learning. While emphasis is placed on assessing student achievement by writing quality assessments, including traditional-type classroom tests, this course provides an opportunity for students to design suitable and demanding assessments for the specialised fields of education. The course will also provide students with the necessary working skills for evaluating and improving the quality of assessment tasks by carefully applying the relevant approaches to establish and strengthen the reliability and validity of classroom assessments. Students will also learn ways to interpret and report assessment data.


ED354FR       Evaluation et mesure de la performance des eleves


Prérequis: ED252FR ou ED154FR ou ED254FR

Semester 1: O sur E                                                         Semester 2: Not offered

pas disponibleCe cours se concentre sur les évaluations conçues et mises en place par l’enseignant dans la classe. Le but du cours est de faire comprendre aux étudiants le rôle majeur de l’évaluation dans le processus d’enseignement-apprentissage et la façon dont ils peuvent mieux enseigner en mettant l’évaluation au coeur de l’apprentissage. Bien que l’accent soit mis sur la rédaction d’outils d’évaluation de qualité pour évaluer la réussite des élèves, y compris les traditionnels contrôles pour toute la classe, les étudiants auront l’occasion de concevoir des évaluations exigeantes et adaptées aux différents domaines éducatifs. Le cours fournira aux étudiants les compétences professionnelles nécessaires pour mesurer et améliorer la qualité des activités d’évaluation en utilisant des approches pertinentes afin de déterminer et de renforcer la fiabilité et la validité des outils d’évaluation dans la classe. Enfin, les étudiants apprendront comment analyser et présenter les données relatives à l’évaluation.


ED357           Literacy & Numeracy Across the Years and Across the Curriculum


Prerequisite: Any 200 level Education course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course looks at the importance of literacy and numeracy across the years, and how it will enable students have a clear understanding of the nature of literacy and numeracy. It features language and literacy as social constructs and addresses theories and its importance in student learning. It also emphasizes that numeracy encompasses not only mathematical concepts and skills (e.g. numerical, spatial, graphical, statistical and algebraic), but also mathematical thinking, general thinking skills, problem solving strategies and the context within which these concepts and skills are to be applied. In addition, it explores what it means to be literate, numerate, and how crucial literacy and numeracy to learning and teaching in any subject across the curriculum and across the years. The course also examines ways of implementing interactive approaches to develop student’s competency in literacy and numeracy across the years/curriculum, including the challenges.


ED358           Community Education


Prerequisites: ED158 or ED258

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course is based on the philosophy of ‘education for change’. It’s purpose is the development of skills and knowledge required to facilitate  community-based projects and programmes in pacific communities. An important focus of the course is the development of projects  and activities in consultation with communities and particpants. The course aims to enhance learning and to empower people to contribute to society as they participate in the assessment of needs, and in the process of planning and implementation of community projects and programmes.


ED359           Educational Research


Prerequisites: Any 200 level Education course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This specialised course is designed for prospective students and senior undergraduate students with a strong interest in Educational Research. The course aims to introduce the beginning researcher to concepts and principles of educational research. Students will be introduced to both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research. The course also focuses on the ethical application of the research process to Education. The major themes of the course are basic research concepts, designs for qualitative and quantitative methodologies, data analysis techniques, and critiques of research. The course will be particularly useful for students who plan to continue with postgraduate studies in Education.


ED359FR       Méthodologie de la recherche en éducation


Prérequis: deux cours de 2e année en sciences de l’éducation

Semester 1: O at E                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

Ce cours spécialisé a été conçu pour les futurs étudiants et les étudiants en dernière année de licence ayant un fort intérêt pour la recherche pédagogique. Le but de ce cours est de faire découvrir au chercheur débutant les concepts et les principes de la recherche en éducation. Les étudiants suivront à la fois l’approche de recherche qualitative et l’approche quantitative. Le cours prend également en considération la conduite éthique de la recherche pédagogique. Les thèmes majeurs du cours sont : les concepts de recherche de base ; les modèles des méthodologies qualitatives et quantitatives ; l’analyse de données et les techniques d’interprétation ; la revue de littérature. Le cours sera particulièrement utile pour les étudiants qui prévoient de continuer leurs études et de faire un master en sciences de l’éducation.


ED362           Inclusive Quality Education


Prerequisite: Any 200 level Education course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course focuses on developing inclusive quality education with a specific focus on the Pacific Region. It is concerned with critically analysing Sustainable Development Goal # 4, understanding child development as it relates to diverse learning needs, communicating inclusively and developing a variety of strategies that would result in quality learning outcomes for students with diverse learning needs including the development of individual education plans where necessary.  Upon completion of this course, teachers should be able to: communicate inclusively and recommend practical  ways of working with children with diverse learning needs in a Pacific context.


ED363           Developing Inclusive School Communities


Prerequisites:  Any 200 level Education course

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This is a core course for BEd (Special and Inclusive Education). It focuses on developing inclusive school communities with a specific focus on the Pacific Region. It is concerned with inclusion in action and new developments in inclusion and inclusive education. The course aims to explore key concepts such as: developing teaching and learning environments for children with varying learning needs, planning for learning and teaching for all children and the development of individual education plans.  Upon completion of this course, teachers should be able to: effectively develop strategies for working with children of varying educational needs.


ED386           Inclusive Movement Performance


Prerequisites:    Admission in to undergraduate programme

Semester 1:Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered B at C

An inclusive approach to human movement performance is the focus of this course. It allows students to exercise social justice principles in their teaching. The course requires students to be able to diagnose, intervene, and evaluate a range of movement competencies in young people for example, gymnastics and athletics. In addition, students also analyse the relevant literature associated with Adaptive Physical Education (APE) and apply inclusive concepts to Pacific Islands context. Students will also learn how to demonstrate effective pedagogical intervention and advocacy strategies for students with diverse learning needs.


ED387           Teaching Physical Education in the Pacific


Prerequisites:   Admission in to undergraduate programme

Semester 1:Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course requires students to investigate the Physical Education Curriculum of any Pacific Island countries against the backdrop of the UNESCO Quality Physical Education Guidelines for Policymakers. Students select a physical education curriculum from  the Pacific and use it for planning, sequencing, and teaching physical education lesson. The course also assists students to apply the pedagogical content knowledge of the course including health and physical literacy, inclusive practices, and Pacific Islands’ movement cultures in the applied components of this course.


ED391           Educational  Leadership & Supervision


Prerequisites: ED291

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the roles that education leaders are required to play as curriculum advisors, education officers and school leaders. It provides a better understanding of the educational administrator as a leader in the school and the school system as well as their communities. It also develops an awareness of the role of educational supervision in instructional improvement and school development. To achieve this, theories of supervision and approaches to supervisory processes are explored.


ED401           Learning & Teaching in Higher Education


Prerequisites: Admission to PGCTT programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

In this course participants will review dominant learning theories, emerging models and trends in learning and knowledge building. They will be engaged in designing learning outcomes, teaching and learning activities and assessment with special emphasis to Pacific contexts and inclusive education for the courses they teach. Participants will form collaborative groups as a community of practice to engage in curriculum review using learning tools and technologies, and develop skills to enhance pedagogical practices for multi-modal deliveries along the e-learning continuum. During the course, participants will create personal reflection e-portfolios that will be continually assessed as feedback for improvement.


ED402           Curriculum Design, Development & Evaluation in Higher Education Contexts


Prerequisites: ED401

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

This course provides participants with an understanding of curriculum design, development and evaluation in HE. They will examine select theories and models of curriculum development, design and assessment, and learning theories. Core topics include curriculum mapping, diversity pedagogies, constructive alignment – from formulation of effective learning outcomes to selection of content, developing positive learning experiences, and approaches to evaluation. Participants will engage in comparative analysis of teaching for the traditional classroom and pedagogical considerations in the shift to design, development and evaluation of blended and online teaching contexts.


ED403           Innovations in Learning Technologies & Professional Practice


Prerequisites: ED401 and ED402

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: O at C

This course provides a greater understanding of the pedagogical foundation required to facilitate a technology-mediated learning environment. Course participants will explore various learning technologies and how technological innovations are changing pedagogical practice in higher education. They will be supported to develop course material utilising Open Educational Resources and e-facilitation techniques for the Pacific learning contexts. They will gain experience in using a selection of online methodologies and approaches and review online good practices. Participants will continue to develop their activity-reflection e-portfolios for formative and summative assessment towards continuous professional development.


ED421           Advanced Studies in Early Childhood Education & Care


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an opportunity for students to undertake advanced study to further enhance their professional knowledge and skills in related areas of early childhood education and care. Students learn about current research, policy, curriculum and assessment practice and engage critically in theoretical debates of working with young children in relation to the UN Conventions of the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). The course also provides an opportunity for students to rethink and reflect critically on the development of a learning model that embrace both Western and Pacific ideas of Early Childhood Education and Care in this modern era.


ED451           Culture & Education                                                    


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course will involve explorations of the relationships between education (as institution and process), and cultural values and influences, with specific references to Pacific Island societies. Current works from the Pacific and around the world will be examined and students will be expected to make their own contributions to the available body of knowledge through their own research activities. A number of themes will be studied and would include: Pacific educational ideas and their relationships to education; school education and indigenous education; role of culture in teaching and learning; cultural universals as markers of change and reform; cultural gaps; teachers as agents of cultural transmission; cultural literacy and schooling; and education and cultural identity. Consideration of the Regional Strategy for Culture and Education (2010) and its implications for education in Pacific Islands schools and higher education institutions will also be considered.


ED454           Advanced Educational Measurement & Evaluation


Prerequisites: ED354 and ED359

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course aims to help students recognise the importance of establishing a sound culture of assessment that supports the long-term development of learners as well as the organisation and its stakeholders. Developing, implementing, and evaluating effective assessment strategies is one of the recurring themes of this course. The course also deals with fundamental measurement and evaluation ideas with respect to student learning as well as other issues in educational assessment.


ED455           Advanced Curriculum Studies


Prerequisites: ED350 or ED355 or ED359

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The purpose of this course is to enable students to re-think curriculum development in Pacific Island Nations, identify and explain significant issues in the current curriculum debate globally as well as regionally. Students will be expected to reflect critically upon current curriculum development processes and structures, develop the competency to define their own curricular positions and make decisions about curriculum-related issues in their own countries. They should learn to theorise their own education and recognise theoretical underpinnings in selected curriculum reform projects in the Pacific region. An important feature of the course is the emphasis given to national as well as regional curriculum initiatives and the need to re-think the school curriculum in terms of curriculum concerns for a more culturally inclusive and gender sensitive curriculum.


ED456           Studies in Science Education


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course is designed to meet the needs of Pacific Island Science Educators. It provides opportunities for science teachers, science learners, advisors, curriculum developers and administrators in primary, secondary, technical and tertiary education institutions to explore contemporary issues and research in science education in some depth. The issues will centre around the science teacher, the science learner, the science classroom and the science curriculum. The course will have an international perspective, but it will also look at problems and issues that are of particular concern in the South Pacific. The course provides students with opportunities to develop skills in reviewing Science Education literature and evaluating research studies. Students enrolled in this course are encouraged to pursue particular research and explore possible thesis topics.


ED457           Advanced Study of Education in Small Island States


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course will provide opportunities for students to study the following four general themes: recent research on the nature of the relationships between education and development; the extent to which educational directions form and are influenced by the development process; the influence on education of major economic, social and political issues in the region; and, selected issues and current problems related to education. The whole course is set against the context of small island states of the Pacific region.


ED461           Education for Sustainable Development


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course will focus on the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (DESD) and its relationship to new sustainable development goals (SDGs), MDGs, UNDL, and EFA. Students will examine the values and ideals underlying these global instruments, as well as their goals and target dates, together with the reasons why these initiatives were set up, their similarities and differences. Special focus is given to DESD and students will conduct research on how Pacific communities conceptualise the main ideas, issues and solutions associated with ESD and critically analyse the implications of their findings for the successful implementation of the Pacific ESD Framework (2006) in students’ home countries. The work of monitoring and evaluation of ESD related activities will also be examined. Other topics will include: research in and for ESD; the role of USP in ESD promotion and advocacy; climate change education and ESD; and the work of UNESCO’s Global Monitoring and Evaluation Group (MEEG).


ED466           Studies in Mathematics Education                         


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course provides an opportunity to investigate questions and concerns about mathematics as a school subject and mathematics education. It will consider the theories, practices and developmental trends in mathematics learning and the mathematics curricula, including the interconnection between curriculum development and various mathematics education issues. Questions about curriculum relevance and issues of equity and social  justice – to do with ethnicity, culture, gender, language and technology – as they arise in mathematics education will be critically examined. Ethnomathematical research and the examination of mathematical knowledge and practices in Pacific societies, both traditional and modern, and how they affect classroom learning will be vigorously pursued.


ED468           Gender & Education


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides a forum for the critical examination and understanding of the different structures, activities and perspectives related to gender and education. It will look at the nature of contemporary gender relations and the construction of gender and gendered identities by educational theories, policies and provisions from various perspectives. How ‘gendering’ has changed over time, how it varies between cultures and social classes in different societies including those of the region, and the implications of these changes in the function and provision of education should create enriching discourse. Education will cover both formal and informal. The topics are relevant to both men and women, and society as a whole.


ED491           Advanced Studies in Educational Leadership


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

The course aims to examine various leadership theories and models, and organisational cultures to give deeper insights into how these impact all dimensions of the schools especially the core business which is learning and teaching. Also, the course explores leadership within educational communities, the change process and the concept of partnership among various stakeholders such as educational administrators, teachers, parents and students, and community members as a means of creating more effective and efficient educational communities of inquiry. The exploration of various concepts theories and models of leadership will enable students to develop their own professional ideas about quality educational leadership to meet the contemporary changes in the educational landscape.


ED492           Advanced Studies in Educational Planning & Development


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course aims to examine various planning theories and models that would give deeper insights into how these could positively impact educational development and in turn improve the core business which is the quality of learning and teaching. Also, the course explores the planning process and the importance of the concept of partnership among various stakeholders such as educational administrators, teachers, parents and students, and community members as a means of creating more effective and efficient educational plans. This demonstrates that it is preferred that planning is a team effort. The course will demonstrate that in educational planning the process is as important as the product that is, the plan.


ED493           Advanced Studies in Educational Policy


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces policy studies in education as a discipline of enquiry and area of practice to educators including educational leaders, planners, policy makers and practitioners. The educational enterprise is dynamically complex and is increasingly becoming a matter of public interest and debate. Therefore, an appreciation and understanding of the educational policy process is useful to the planners themselves, as well as educators generally. The course deals with relevant theoretical perspectives, research bases and practical experiences in various aspects of educational policy process.


ED600F         Education SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                            

ED600P         Education SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                          

ED700F         Education Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                     

ED700P         Education Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                    

ED750F         Education DRP (Full-Time)

ED750P         Education DRP (Part-Time)                                                                 

ED800F         Education PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                              

ED800P         Education PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                                                            

EDP01           Pacific Principles in Educational Leadership        


Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Certificate in Education Policy & Planning

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered                                                            Course Does Not Follow Semester Structure

                                                                                              (F and B at SI, E, NI, CI, TU, K, TON, RMI, NA, and SAM)

This  course  presents  the  latest  research  on  educational  leadership  in  the  Pacific,  with  focus  on  school leadership for improvement.  Students will explore Pacific conceptualisations of leadership in an educational context, focusing on the values, philosophies that guide leadership practices in Pacific schooling, including the Pacific Principles’ Framework. Students address the local needs and challenges within their context and how they can best support school principals. Students will be encouraged to appreciate the diverse cultural and social relationships that are held by school principals in unique island communities.


EDP02           Educational Policy Studies in the Pacific               


Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Certificate in Education Policy and Planning

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

                                                                                              Course Does Not Follow Semester Structure (F and B at E & SI)

This course introduces students to Policy formulation drawing on international theories and current practices from Ministries of Education in the Pacific. The course will explore dialectical approaches to understanding educational policy framework used by the national Ministries of Education. The course will include approaches to drafting a school policy, strategies for monitoring a school policy and implementing such a policy in the school context. The course will draw on examples from school policies around the region. Also, the course will highlight emerging policy frameworks evident around the region that are based on indigenous Pacific epistemologies.


EDP03           Educational Planning in the Pacific                                                                         


Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Certificate in Education Policy and Planning

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

                                                                                              Course Does Not Follow Semester Structure (F and B at E & SI)

The course introduces students to the dimensions of educational planning at ministerial and education system wide level, drawing on examples of national education plans across the region. Through a case study approach, students will be encouraged to examine current processes for planning used by national ministries of education, including the use of EMIS and available data for formulating education plans.


EDP04           Financing Education in the Pacific                                                                           


Prerequisites: Admission to Professional Certificate in Education Policy and Planning

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

                                                                                              Course Does Not Follow Semester Structure (F and B at E & SI)

This course provides students with knowledge necessary for successful planning and management of educational finances within a school system and an education system. Students will be presented with learning opportunities for refining their skills in managing finances, developing their competency in budgeting and allocating resources, and enriching their conceptual understanding of fiscal stewardship and responsibility. A particular emphasis is placed on managing and utilizing statistical school data in supporting financial planning.


EDP05           Planning Professional Development                                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Certificate in School Leadership

Semester 1: F at RMI                                                      Semester 2: Not offered

This course encourages school leaders to take responsibility for the development and managing of teachers’ professional learning. It also provides opportunities for them to improve their practice in the application of: professional standards, evaluate training needs, planning for professional development and planning professional development activities.


EDP06           School Leadership                                                                                                        


Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Certificate in School Leadership

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Not offered

This course encourages school leaders to acquire skills and knowledge of school leadership; ethical leadership; visionary leadership; and school leaders as agents of change. It also provides opportunities for them to improve their practice. With an improved understanding of school leadership, they are encouraged to apply lessons learnt in their pratice to improving schools.


EDP07           School Management                                                                                                   


Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Certificate in School Leadership

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: F at RMI

This course encourages school leaders to explore the following topics: School Management, Resource Management, Operational Management and Disaster and Risk Management. It also provides opportunities for them to apply the knowledge gained in managing their schools.


EDP08           Enhancing Learning & Teaching Environment                            


Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Certificate in School Leadership

Semester 1: F at RMI                                                      Semester 2: Not offered

This course encourages school leaders to explore the following topics: Beginning teacher; Learners and learning; Conducive learning environment; and Curriculum Instruction. It also provides opportunities for them to apply learning from the course to their school context to improve learning environment.


EDP09           Community Partnership                                                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Certificate in School Leadership

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course explores the following topics: Understanding School Community Dynamics, Inclusive collaboration, Community Involvement and Learning community. It also provides opportunities for school leaders to apply the knowledge from the course to building stronger community partnerships.


FJ101 (LL166)                      Fijian for Beginners                              


Prerequisites: Not to be taken by students with prior knowledge of Fijian.

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is an introduction to Fijian language and culture. It provides the student with basic working information on the language (speaking, understanding, reading, writing) in order to interact and communicate with other speakers while gaining an understanding of the cultural perspectives and practices of the Fijian-speaking culture.


FJ111 (LL161)                      Fijian Language Studies 1 – Vakadidike Vosa Vakaviti 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate programme AND a working knowledge of Fijian

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the study of the Fijian language, its major divisions and varieties and the pivotal concepts of its grammar, as well as its relationship to other Austronesian languages. The successful student will, by the end of the course, be familiar with the broad area of Fijian language studies and be equipped with basic linguistic terminology and analytic skills.


FJ121 (LL162)                      Fijian Orature/Literature 1 – Umavosa Maroroi Vakaviti 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate programme AND a working knowledge of Fijian

Semester 1:Not offered                                                 Semester 2: F at L and O at C

This course proceeds from the study of the Fijian language to an introduction to the verbal arts of Fijian society. It also includes a critical history of printed literature which has been adapted/translated from oral sources or translated from or into other literatures, and which have shaped Fijian imagination.


FJ211 (LL261)                      Fijian Language Studies 2


Prerequisites: FJ111

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2:  Not offered

This course builds on the work of FJ111. The successful student will, by the end of the course, have mastered the main currents of grammatical discourse and analysis and gained a thorough appreciation of the Fijian language, studied both in its own contexts and in the wider context of Austronesian languages.


FJ212 (LL215)                      The Teaching of Fijian


Prerequisites: FJ111

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Fijian and its educational use across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers of Fijian, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way the language is taught in schools across Fiji. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of Fijian language and culture, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


FJ221 (LL262)                      Fijian Orature/Literature 2                


Prerequisites: FJ121

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2:  F at L and O at C

This course develops the concerns of FJ121 and further explores various critical issues regarding the provenance and interpretation of inscribed oral texts. It includes a detailed appreciation of different types of narrative and of poetry within the different vanua repertoires as well as in library and archival collections. The course is intended to create a broader appreciation of the extent of Fijian orature/literature, a mastery of recording methods and analytical skills within the contexts of literature and culture studies.


FJ311 (LL361)                      Fijian Language Studies 3 (Vakadidike Vosa Vakaviti 3)          


Prerequisites: FJ211

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on the work of LL261. The successful student will, by the end of the course, have mastered the main currents of grammatical discourse and analysis, and gained a thorough appreciation of the Fijian language, studied both in its own contexts and in the wider context of Austronesian languages.


FJ321 (LL362)                      Orality, Literacy & Culture                 


Prerequisites: FJ221

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C

This course builds on FJ221, studies in Fijian orature and literature in Fijian, in its various formations and contexts. FJ321 invites students to specialise in selected verbal icons and institutions of Fijian culture, and challenges them to delve more deeply into the cultural symbols and metaphors that underpin ritual, ceremonial and cultural behaviour. The course will also examine issues in Fijian literacy.


FJ411                  Tuvavosa. Information Structure                       


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme; Proficiency in the Fijian Language

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not Offered

In this course students will analyse the structure of phrases, clauses, sentences and linkages in a Fijian dialect they are fluent in. Beyond the language data analysis, students will also examine what the purposes are of the different structures in the different oral genres. In other words, students will find out the function of the information structure of the verbless sentences and noun phrases.


FJ412                  iBalebale ni Yaca. Names and Naming                                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme; Proficiency in the Fijian Language

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                            Semester 2: Not Offered

FJ412 is designed to find meaning and history in names of people and places, and any changes that may have taken place in the culture of naming. Students will learn of an important source of story, journeys, events and relationships through names. The opportunity to study names relevant to a person and information in names will be presented. The researched background and history to names and naming traditions will further the sense and understanding of self, place and relationships.


FJ413                  Na Veisau ni Vosa.  Language and Change                             


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme; Proficiency in the Fijian Language

Semester 1: Not Offered                                                     Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course explores phonological changes in Fijian and also in historically related languages. Using Natural Phonology, the process and causes for historical and synchronic sound change will be investigated to explain differences between the Fijian sound system, dialectal varieties and in informal oral talk. An understanding of sound change is essential in appreciating language differences, teaching language, writing and decision making regarding language.


FJ421                  Mata kei na Sevu. Relationships and Governance               


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme; Proficiency in the Fijian Language

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                            Semester 2: Not Offered

Every iTaukei Fijian belongs to an indigenous entity of place and chiefdom in Fiji. This belonging is the epitome of being an itaukei. Essentially, in that itaukei space of belonging, is a role, its responsibilities, its relationships, its connectedness with the environment and also to the ancestral world. Alongside these are the assigned knowledge, skills and forms of expression relevant to such position in the itaukei space, so too are there the sanctions and taboos of the itaukei Fijian world. As itaukei Fijians embody these knowledge, one is well equipped to relate with others, value people and the environment and practise traditional governance.


FJ422                   Sau kei na Mana. Of chiefs, chiefdoms and sacred spaces                       


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme; Proficiency in the Fijian Language

Semester 1: Not offered                                                      Semester 2: B at L and O at C

Chiefly leadership is a vital component of itaukei Fijian vanua or chiefdom. This course will examine paramountcy in being a title holder as well as the challenges of chiefly leadership in Fiji today. As an inherited position in a culture based on tradition, there is little that one can learn about chiefs in the education system as the title is bestowed by the people of the chiefdom. It is therefore dependent on the chiefs’ leadership style and the support of the people for a chiefdom to attain mana in the sau of a vanua. Until then sautu or wellbeing remains merely in itukuni or folktales.


FR101                                    Introduction to the French Language


Prerequisites: Not to be taken by students with prior knowledge of French

Semester 1: F at L                                               Semester 2: F at L

 This course provides a basic introduction to French language and culture. It enables students to listen, speak, read and write French in a range of simple situations, to a level equivalent to A1 on the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Students will learn elementary pronunciation and spelling, vocabulary, grammar structures and rules. They will be able to understand and use expressions and simple sentences to greet and meet someone, to introduce themselves and to ask about others. Students will learn about the metropolitan French cultural staples (social relations, places and history) but also about the wider francophone world, with a focus on French speaking countries of the Pacific.


FR201                                    Intermediate French Studies


Prerequisites: FR101

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

By the end of this course, the student will be expected to understand normal spoken and printed colloquial French, as presented in broadcast/recorded and published materials on a wide variety of subjects drawn from the francophone media. They will be able to express intention, justify choices, talk about feelings and emotions, etc. Simple literary texts will also be studied. Speaking and writing skills will be continuously exercised.


FR301                                    Advanced French


Prerequisites: FR201

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course is an advanced language course that will provide knowledge and skills in French to understand the main points of clear standard speech on familiar subjects in work, school and leisure. It will enable students to manage in most situations that occur when travelling in a region where the language is spoken, to produce a cohesive text on familiar or professional subjects, to narrate an event, an experience, a dream or a goal, and to outline reasons or explanations. At the end of the course, there will be opportunities to sit for an internationally-recognised Diploma in French (DELF).


FR302                                    French for Business                              


Prerequisites: FR201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course is a language course designed for students nearing graduation, which will provide them with knowledge and skills in Business French. The course will focus on the capacity to communicate and negotiate in a corporate environment. Students will learn about French culture in business. On completion, students will have knowledge in French and advanced understanding of the way to behave in a commercial situation, and there will be opportunities to sit for an internationally- recognised Diploma in French (DELF).


HN101                                  Conversational Hindi                                                    


Prerequisites: Not to be taken by students with prior knowledge of Fiji Hindi

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course provides an introduction to conversational Hindi. It enables students to interact and communicate with the Hindi speaking community, both in Fiji and beyond. With the emergence of India as a thriving economic powerhouse, an ability to converse in Hindi opens up new opportunities for employment and travel. Meanwhile, Hindi is one of the major vernacular languages of Fiji, so this course presents the chance to communicate more widely, make new friends or watch Bollywood movies without the subtitles!


HN102                                  Unlocking Standard Hindi                                                                                 


Prerequisites: Admission into UG programme AND oral proficiency in Hindi

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is for students who speak Hindi with confidence in their daily lives, but who are ‘locked out’ of written texts by the Devanagari script. Using some simple techniques, online tools and lots of practice, you will become fluent readers and writers of Hindi, thereby unlocking a whole world of new texts. Whether you are interested in learning to read and write Hindi for employment purposes, to learn more about your history and culture, or to write your own blog, HN102 can help you. The course will also improve your speaking and listening skills in Standard Hindi.


HN111                                  Introduction to Hindi Language Studies


Prerequisites: Admission into UG programme AND a working knowledge of Hindi and the Devanagari script

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

The course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in Hindi, and develops their awareness of the phonological, orthographic, lexical and morphosyntactic elements of the language. Students will develop an understanding of the historical and social context in which Hindi is spoken, and the extent to which the language has changed over time.


HN121                                  Introduction to Hindi Literature       


Prerequisites: Admission into UG programme AND a working knowledge of Hindi and the Devanagari script

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course will introduce students to the major genres of Hindi literature and how these genres developed overtime from the golden classics (Adikaal) to the neo-modern Hindi writings (Adhunik Kaal). Students will learn about the evolution of various literary devices such as ras, chhand and alankaar, and literary theories such as chayawaad, pragativaad etc. Works of selected eminent writers will be analysed, preparing students to become efficient readers and critical thinkers while enjoying the aesthetics of Hindi literature. The course will expose students to essential audio-video content relevant for studying Hindi literature in the 21st century and show the emerging trends in literature from India and other parts of the world, especially the South Pacific.


HN211                                  Varieties of Hindi                                  


Prerequisites: HN111 or HN121

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

There are two components to this course: a more advanced study of the Hindi language, and the use of Hindi according to the mode of communication and the relationship between the user and the audience. The latter will deal with the characteristics of Hindi used for different purposes, such as formal and informal communication, instructions, administration, sports commentary, journalistic reportage, advertising, political speeches, religious functions. The course will also examine the relationship between standard Hindi and Fiji Hindi.


HN212                                  The Teaching of Hindi


Prerequisites: HN111 or HN121

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Hindi and its educational use across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way the language is taught in schools across Fiji. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of Hindi, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


HN221                                  Hindi Prose Fiction                                


Prerequisites: HN111 or HN121

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and P at C

The course examines Hindi prose fiction as a distinctive body of writing. It traces its origin and milieu and engages in the study of the language, cultural concerns and aesthetic values of representative texts. Students will evaluate the literary and cultural traditions, pervasive tendencies, narrative form and critical systems of Hindi prose fiction.


HN321                                  Culture, Literature & Language        


Prerequisites: One of HN211, HN212, HN221

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course is intended to offer an in-depth study of Indian culture and is not designed exclusively for students of literature and language. The course will involve explorations of the relationships between language, literature and cultural values and influences, with specific reference to Fiji Island societies. Comparisons will be made between cultural value inherent in the language(s) used and the influences from other cultures both within and outside Fiji.


HN331                                  Cultural Studies                                                             


Prerequisites: One of HN211, HN212, HN221

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

The course will introduce the field of cultural studies in Hindi, including Fiji-Hindi texts, define its overlapping subject matter, and encourage students to work on one or two major areas of study such as history of cultural studies, gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, popular culture, identity politics, global culture, post-colonialism, pedagogy, discourse and textuality, and research on language, culture and aesthetics.


JN101            Introduction to Journalism


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course is offered as an elective to all students. The course is a conceptual and a practical introduction to journalism which surveys the media in the South Pacific. It will focus on the practical skills of news writing for print and online media. It will be conducted through a combination of lectures and extensive practical workshops and assignments for the training newspaper Wansolwara and its website. Emphasis will be placed on writing news in plain and clear English.


JN103            Media Law & Ethics


Prerequisites: JN101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course is offered as an elective to all students. The course examines the rights, responsibilities and moral obligations of journalists. Students will be familiarised with the laws of defamation, contempt of Parliament and the courts, conventions of court reporting, privacy, breach of confidentiality, and human rights. The course will also examine media ethical concepts, including the role of ethical codes, and fairness and balance in the media. The course will be delivered through formal lectures, group discussion and weekly reading.


JN201            Print & Online Journalism


Prerequisites: JN103

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course will teach skills in page making and layout, photo editing and captioning, and Internet publishing. Classes will include lectures, workshops, and current affairs news forums. Lecture topics will include texts and images, the history and development of press photography, cropping the photograph, image processing, computing, and online journalism. Students will also be assigned subediting work on the training newspaper Wansolwara.


JN202            Radio Broadcasting


Prerequisites: JN103

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course will teach skills in radio broadcast equipment use, interviewing, writing scripts, writing news bulletins, programming and presentations. Classes will include lectures, workshops, and current affairs news forums. Lecture topics will include the impact of radio on society, broadcasting in the South Pacific and internationally, propaganda versus news, new technologies, press freedom, and ethics. Students will also be assigned reporting and production work on Radio Pasifik.


JN203            Television Journalism


Prerequisites: JN103

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L

The course distinguishes the process involved in writing for television as distinct from other media. It puts stress on teaching visual language skills. Workshops will include video scripting, camera techniques, sound and lighting, location issues, editing with Final Cut Pro, and producing TV news, news features, and documentaries. The focus of the course is journalistic as well as technical. Lecture topics will include the history and development of television/cinema in the Pacific and internationally.


JN301            International Journalism


Prerequisites: JN201, JN202 and JN203

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The main theme throughout this course is international journalism with a special emphasis on the role of the media in the Pacific and the Pacific Rim. Students will learn the various theories of how media function in various countries. Topics will include press freedom, development journalism, international journalism ethics, war reporting, public diplomacy, comparative journalism, and news media ownership and control internationally and in the South Pacific.


JN302            Journalism Research


Prerequisites: JN201, JN202 and JN203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Students are introduced to scientific methods of researching stories using statistics, archival sources and written materials. The main aim is to learn how to obtain information through the use of databases and the Internet. Students will also be introduced to more specialised areas of journalism such as government, health and the arts. They will learn to interpret data, obtain statistically valid poll data and report on it. Assignments will be published in the Wansolwara.


JN303            Journalism Production


Prerequisites: JN201, JN202 and JN203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: F at L

In this course students will learn to demonstrate their ability to take responsibility as journalists and to professionally put into practice their journalism skills developed during the double major.


JN700F          Pacific Media Studies Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                             

JN700P          Pacific Media Studies Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                      



LN111                                    Introduction to Language Studies


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course introduces the key foundations of Linguistics – the scientific study of language and languages. We all use language every day, and yet many people know far less about language and languages than they think they do. This course helps students appreciate the almost infinite variety in language, and shows them how the languages they speak fit into their society and culture. It also explores how languages are acquired, learnt and taught. LN111 will appeal to anyone with an interest in language and communication.


LN118 (                                 The Languages of the Pacific


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course delves into the immense multilingual complexity of the USP region. We begin with an introduction to the structure of different languages, learning how Pacific linguists work with language data. We then cover a geographical and historical overview of the languages of Melanesia, Polynesia and Micronesia, examining how so many languages have come to exist in the region, and considering what Linguistics can tell us about migration patterns and early settlers of the different islands. Finally, we look at the language situation across the Pacific today, looking briefly at topics such as language endangerment and official language status.


LN211                                   The Structure of English                      


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the description and analysis of the structure of English. It looks at the way sounds and words are formed (phonology and morphology), and then examines the way words are joined together as phrases, then clauses, and then sentences (syntax). It aims to reveal the patterns that underlie English, in ways that will be useful for anyone studying, using or teaching the language. LN211 will be of interest to those who use English on a daily basis, but want to know more about how it actually works!


LN212                                   The Teaching of Pacific Languages


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Pacific languages and their educational use across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way languages are taught across the region. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of one or more languages, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


LN213                                   Second Language Learning & Teaching


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L O at C

 This course provides trainee language teachers with the skills required to teach second languages effectively. It examines the principles of second language acquisition, before showing how these principles inform practical approaches to the teaching of reading, writing, listening and speaking. An integrated approach to skills teaching and assessment will be advocated, with a balance between meaning and form, and between fluency and accuracy. Topics and activities will draw on authentic examples, scenarios and materials from classrooms across the Pacific. The focal language will be English, but the principles and approaches can be applied to the teaching of any second language.


LN216                                   Language Use in the 21st Century Pacific


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course examines the way language is used in the Pacific region in the current, globalised era. In the first half of the course, we introduce different frameworks through which to understand multilingualism, and we use these to examine a range of linguistic data from speech, writing, music, street signs, graffiti, text messages and social media. In the second half, we consider how best to communicate messages of contemporary importance to a target audience, learning how to design multilingual posters, webpages, video clips and other resources. This course will appeal to students enrolled on a variety of programmes.


LN311                                   English in the Pacific                             


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines English specifically as it is used in the Pacific. It begins by tracing the spread of English – as a colonial language, a language of globalisation, and an international lingua franca. It considers different varieties of English, and discusses what is meant by ‘Pacific English’. It examines the role that English plays throughout our region, and considers the deep-rooted beliefs and attitudes that are held regarding this language. LN311 gives students from a variety of programmes a valuable opportunity to reflect critically on a language that is afforded such a high role and status in the region.


LN315 Corpus Linguistics and Language Technology                


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118__

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Computer-aided research of language material is increasingly popular in contemporary research. This course is an introduction to corpus linguistics, where a ‘corpus’ refers to a collection of electronic texts that represent a sample of a particular variety of use of language(s). You will explore various software applications for collecting, displaying and analysing linguistic information from corpora, examining practical examples that include large corpora such as the Australian National Corpus, smaller corpora of Pacific languages (Paradisec archive), web-based corpora, and specific app-based corpora such as Twitter. There will be a final project, which requires students to conduct research on text data and language.


LN316                                   Applied Linguistics                                


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                               Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the field of Applied Linguistics, which is an interdisciplinary area of research into a range of language-related issues. Issues covered may include translation, interpreting, discourse analysis, multilingualism, language revitalisation and maintenance, and language learning and teaching. These are real life applications of language in operation all around us in the Pacific, and the course will consider both theoretical and practical aspects of these endeavours. LN316 is a course that will be of interest to students who are interested in the way language interacts with real-world issues and problems in their own countries.


LN317                                   Qualitative Analysis of Texts           


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

 This course uses different frameworks, tools and techniques to analyse written, spoken and multimodal texts. We use qualitative analysis to identify the ‘stories-we-live-by’ and the ways these are constructed through different linguistic devices. This type of analysis illustrates the impact of language on the world around us, and demonstrates the power of the words we choose to use whenever we communicate.


LN318                      Selected Topics in Linguistics                        


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This is a project-based course that enables students to apply the skills and knowledge gained throughout their programme. Different topics may be the focus of the course in different semesters.


LN319                                   Language Documentation


Prerequisites: LN111 or LN118

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2:  B at L and O at C

This is a project-based course that covers methodologies and technologies used in language documentation. Students learn how to collect, record, organise, store and analyse primary linguistic data, and they discover the social dimensions of work with speakers of lesser-studied languages. The course features hands-on training in the form of an individual documentation project, where students gain useful skills (audio and video recording, transcribing, organising and archiving collected materials) that can be transferable in their professional lives.


LN411                                   Advanced Language Analysis


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course provides advanced training in the analysis of language, focusing on the phonological, morpho-syntactic and semantic elements of English and Pacific languages. English teachers will learn to apply these analytic techniques to practical classroom approaches that will transform the teaching of English pronunciation, grammar and vocabulary in the context of the Pacific region. Students intending to pursue a research degree in Descriptive Linguistics will learn to apply these analytic techniques to a detailed description of one or more Pacific languages.


LN413                                   Sociolinguistics


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is an introduction to sociolinguistics, that part of linguistics that studies the connection between language and society. Speakers of the same language do not all speak exactly the same way, and an individual speaker does not speak the same way all the time. Through a variety of readings, discussions, and assignments, we will explore language variation across regions, ethnicity, social class, gender, age, and more.  Students will learn how sociolinguistic research is conducted and will become familiar with the major findings of sociolinguistic research studies.


LN416                                   Language Acquisition & Multilingualism               


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at L and O at C

This course provides in-depth coverage of the way first and subsequent languages are acquired and learned, with specific reference to the Pacific context. The course addresses the acquisition of one or more languages in a non-school environment, as well as formal, classroom-based teaching and learning. Topics covered include the roles of input, motivation and explicit instruction within language learning, theoretical perspectives on bilingualism and multilingualism, models of bilingual and multilingual education, and different approaches to the teaching of vernaculars and languages of wider communication.


LN418                                   Integrating the Four Skills in English


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course covers both theoretical and practical approaches to the teaching and assessment of English as it is used in academic contexts. It takes an integrated approach to what have traditionally been labelled the ‘four skills’ of reading, writing, listening and speaking, and helps teachers teach beyond the test to foster active users of English. It moves teachers away from a surface-level understanding of ‘skills’ and enables them to prepare curricula and assessments that will foster meaningful and relevant use of the language.


LN419            Technologies, Texts & Techniques for English Language Teaching


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course is a very practical course that focuses on teaching strategies for the classroom. It provides hands-on experience working with innovative technologies to develop teachers’ skills in the use of new tools when preparing and developing the curriculum. It provides strategies for getting the most out of prescribed texts and text books, creating new texts based on learner needs, and transforming resource-poor teaching environments. It provides practical techniques for a range of elements that may include error correction, the promotion of fluency, and the integration of language and academic content from across the curriculum.


LN600F                                 Linguistics SRP (Full-Time)                                                                   

LN600P                                 Linguistics SRP (Part-Time)                                                                  

LN700F                                 Linguistics Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                            

LN700P                                 Linguistics Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                           

LN750F                                 Linguistics DRP (Full-Time)                                           

LN750P                                 Linguistics DRP (Part-Time)                                          

LN800F (LL                          Linguistics PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                              

LN800P                                 Linguistics PhD Thesis (Part-Time)    

LT102 (LL102)                     Contemporary Literary Criticism: Key Terms & Texts 1


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces students to the key terms and concepts of contemporary literary criticism. Some may be familiar (such as Character), while others may be new (such as Ideology), but all will be considered in new and exciting ways. Students will be shown how to employ these key terms and concepts as analytical tools for unlocking a variety of texts. They will be invited to adopt different perspectives and viewpoints on the same text. By the end of the course, they will have developed a sound critical approach through the art of sustained thinking, reading and interpretation.


LT104 (LL104)                     Islands 1: Real & Imaginary               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C

This introductory course takes as its focus texts and concepts relating to islands. Students will analyse a broad spectrum of material ranging from short stories, novels, diaries, memories, and histories to songs, images, plays, and films. The course is organised in two parts. The first is a survey of different types of islands, real as well as imagined, while the second accounts for the various character types that have become part of the familiar, often stereotyped, dramatis personae of island literature.


LT108 (LL108)                     Introduction to Children’s Literature                     


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

Students enrolled in this course will read and critically assess a selection of texts intended for non-adult readers. They will engage with a broad spectrum of narrative types and genres, including picture books, poetry, novels and graphic texts. This course demonstrates how children’s texts invite readers to take up positions that are never wholly innocent of ideology, ethics, contexts and cultural assumptions.


LT202 (LL202)                     Contemporary Literary Criticism: Key Terms & Texts 2


Prerequisites: LT102 or LT104

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C

Building on LT102, this course introduces students to more sophisticated key terms and concepts. Students will be shown how to employ these key terms as analytical tools for unlocking a variety of texts. They will be invited to adopt different perspectives and viewpoints on the same text. By the end of the course, they will have developed a more advanced critical approach through the art of sustained thinking, reading and interpretation.


LT204 (LL204)                     Islands 2: Myths & Metaphors


Prerequisites: LT102 or LT104

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

Building on LT104, this course explores the founding myths and governing metaphors of island literature. It examines the special role of islands in various imaginative, philosophical and historical accounts: islands as spaces inspiring narratives of fantastic voyages and encounters with fabulous creatures; islands as locations for projecting idyllic worlds and communities; islands as testing-grounds for utopian and dystopian projects. Students will explore the role of the castaway myth in conceptions of the sovereign European subject, and its complex presence in colonial and postcolonial texts.


LT231 (LL231)                     Film History & Theory


Prerequisites: At least one 100 Level course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This is a course in film history and theory. It introduces students to seminal moments in cinema history, to important theoretical approaches in film studies as well as to key figures and movies in world cinema. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of film history, theory and film aesthetics as well as an appreciation of cinema from different parts of the world.


LT305 (LL305)                     Others 1: Figures of Difference         


Prerequisites: LT202 or LT204

Semester 1: F at L and O at C                                       Semester 2: Not offered

This course analyses representations of difference through the figure of the other, focusing on gender, race, nationality, life and humanity. It investigates the ways in which different narrative forms present and engage with notions of otherness, from women to slaves, from vampires to ghosts. Through close readings of novels, short stories, plays, poems and films the course will present thorough literary and theoretical pictures of the way in which we engage with the fear, attraction and mystique that surround otherness.


LT306 (LL306)                     Others 2: Performances of Difference                    


Prerequisites: LT202 or LT204

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not Offered

Building on LT305, this course continues to analyse engagements with difference through the figure of the other, this time focusing on more challenging notions of space, social structures, politics, dystopias and ontological identity. The theoretical and literary texts engage with new differences caused or exacerbated by modern power struggles and advancement in technologies. This course reads the way in which society struggles to engage with otherness within itself, and the otherness that is thought to threaten from outside. In looking at different forms of the other it seeks to develop students’ critical understanding of concepts of identity and humanity


LT307 (LL307)                     Texts & Commodities                           


Prerequisites: LT202 or LT204

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L and O at C

Texts and commodities are closely interwoven entities. While cultural texts engage imaginatively with material worlds founded on the pursuit of commodities (such as sugar, slaves, spices, ivory, tea, oil and opium), they also circulate as commodities within a global marketplace. This course explores the relationship between texts and commodities in fiction and poetry from diverse commodity frontiers. Introducing students to new approaches in postcolonial, environmental and materialist criticism, it considers how different literary forms engage with the complex world history of various commodities.


LT331 (LL331)                     Creative Texts                                        


Prerequisites: At least one 200 level course

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

The aim of this course is to give students guided experience in the writing of short stories, poems, plays, screenplays, memoir, travel writing and other imaginative genres. It is intended as a practical exercise in creative skills and is not restricted to students of literature. Students from any department or school within the university may register.


LT401 (LL401)                     Studies in Pacific Literature in English                   


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at L

This course will trace the development of Pacific literature in English, from the post-war ventures in travel writing and drama, to the great prose works of the 1970s, to the experimental poetics and electronic literature of the twenty-first century. Literature from the Oceania region will be studied from a range of critical perspectives, and in its various historical contexts. The course will identify and analyse key themes in Pacific literature, including tradition and modernisation, diaspora and displacement, colonialism and independence, globalisation and climate change.


LT402 (LL402)                     Studies of Women Authors


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not Offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces texts by women authors, to be analysed in the critical context of contemporary feminist theory. From the canonical to the marginalised, these texts cover a range of genres, periods and cultural backgrounds. By the end of the course, you will have developed a general understanding of the history of women’s writing in English. You will also be able to identify the relevance of this literature in the Pacific today, analysing changes and continuities between the issues explored by earlier European women writers, and their later colonial and postcolonial counterparts.


LT403 (LL403)                     Creative Texts


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course is concerned with the production of creative texts in several genres, including short fiction, drama, travel essay and poetry.  Students will learn how to seek inspiration, select a theme, style and point of view, introduce crisis and complexity, structure the imagination, compose dialogue, harmonise character with voice, tone, rhythm and mood, identify a suitable form or narrative and generate variations through the control of pace and urgency.


LT406 (LL406)                     Studies in Literary Theory


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not Offered

This course explores major areas in the broad range of literary theory. The shape of the course will change periodically. It may include a historical survey or it may focus on a particular approach such as cultural studies, feminism, structuralism or deconstruction or it may trace a given problem through the work of several theorists and periods.  The course is intended to assist the prospective postgraduate researcher in locating a theoretical construct within which to work.


LT407 (LL407)                     Study of a Selected Author


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: F at L                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course concentrates on the study of a selected author from a particular literary period. The course moves from biography to major works and uses a broad based critical approach.


LT410 (LL410)                     Study of a Selected Genre


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course involves a detailed examination of a selected literary genre or sub-genre: postcolonial novel, narrative, satire, film script, tragedy, radio drama, sonnet, romance, epic, etc. Material may be drawn from a single tradition or from several cultural sources and may involve cross-cultural comparative study.


LT600F (LL600F)                 Literature SRP (Full-Time)                                                                    

LT600P (LL600P)                Literature SRP (Part-Time)                                                                   

LT700F (LL700F)                 Literature Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                             

LT700P (LL700P)                Literature Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                            

LT750F (LL750F)                 Literature DRP (Full-Time)                  

LT750P (LL750P)                Literature DRP (Part-Time)                                         

LT800F (LL800F)                 Literature PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                               

LT800P (LL800P)                Literature PhD Thesis (Part-Time)     

NU111           Vagahau Niue 1                                                             


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate programme AND proficiency in Vagahau Niue

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in Vagahau Niue, and develops their awareness of the phonological, orthographic, lexical and morphosyntactic elements of the language. Students will develop an understanding of the historical and social context in which Vagahau Niue is spoken, and the extent to which the language has changed over time. Through the use of archival and online research, students will survey the tools and resources that currently exist in the language, and will learn to create contemporary materials using print-based and digital technologies.


NU131           Taoga Niue                                                                      


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate programme AND proficiency in Vagahau Niue

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills of Taoga Niue, covering customs and traditions, cultural etiquette and protocols, environment, history, arts and crafts, Vagahau Niue, heritage assets (Museum, Archives, Genealogy & Library), and the cultural bridge with Niue diaspora abroad. Through the use of archival and online research, students will survey the tools and resources that currently exist, and will observe and practise these cultural etiquette and protocols in real life situations.


NU211           Vagahau Niue 2                                                             


Prerequisites: NU111

Semester 1: F at NI                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course seeks to build on the knowledge and skills gained in NU111, and has applications of immediate relevance to a range of work-related contexts. It seeks to enrich students’ Vagahau Niue vocabulary and grammar, enabling them to interpret and produce texts of greater complexity and richness, and helping them to understand the relevance of purpose, audience and focus. It tackles elements of language knowledge that enable students to move from concrete to abstract concepts, from restricted to elaborate language, and from surface-level to deep critical engagement with texts.


NU212           The Teaching of Vagahau Niue                                 


Prerequisites: NU111

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at NI

This course focuses on the teaching of Vagahau Niue and the educational use of this language across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way this language is taught. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of the language, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


NU311           Vagahau Niue Translation & Interpreting                                    


Prerequisites: NU111

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the practice of translation and interpreting between Vagahau Niue and English. It develops the knowledge and skills required to create, translate and interpret texts, focusing on strategies used when developing new terminology, dealing with cross-linguistic and cross-cultural differences, and preparing carefully-edited texts for publication.


NU331           Niue in its Contemporary Context                                                  


Prerequisites: NU111 or NU131

Semester 1:Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge of relevant Niue contemporary issues affecting the people and environment. It develops their awareness of the impact of issues such as depopulation, renewable energy, climate change, land matters, biodiversity, water and marine resources, health and well-being, and technological change. It considers these issues in conjunction with the promotion, strengthening and integration of taoga Niue cultural values, heritage, identity and language. Through the use of archival and online research, students will survey the resources that currently exist and will learn to create contemporary materials using print-based and digital technologies.


PA101           Pacific Ways of Seeing, Knowing & Doing            


Prerequisites: Admission into undergraduate programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Pacific epistemologies offer distinct ways of experiencing and understanding the world. In this course, students are introduced to Pacific ways of knowing and being. Students will through dialogic encounters be encouraged to bring their own cultural approaches to knowledge into the class, to prompt reflection and consideration of how an epistemology can inform an approach to cultural and arts practice, understanding of aesthetics and heritage management in the Pacific. This offers an entry point from which students can navigate their way through their programme of study and approach knowledge from a reflective standpoint.


PA102           Pacific Arts Practice 1 (Performing & Visual Arts Strands)      


Prerequisites: Admission into undergraduate programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course introduces vocabularies of the arts (strands: 1. dance and music; and 2. visual arts) in the contemporary Pacific, establishing a basis of technical knowledge for progression in the Performing Arts and Visual art streams. Through studio practices, students will advance their understanding of Pacific terminologies and their performing competence in learning, creating and performing music, dance; and visual arts. The course draws on Pacific traditions and global techniques to diversify understandings of artistic technique. It is expected that students entering this course will have some practical experience/training and interest in music or dance or visual arts and be willing to extend their existing knowledge through an engagement with the technical training.


PA103           Introduction to Pacific Heritage


Prerequisites: None

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to cultural and natural heritage in the Pacific.

Students will explore perspectives of indigenous/local groups with Western conceptions of ‘cultural’, ‘natural’, ‘tangible and ‘intangible’ heritage in the context of identity, personhood, knowledge systems, and sustainable development.  Coverage  includes  an investigation  into  contested  understandings of heritage, heritage as a human right, museums  and heritage  sites, memory  and history,  tangible  and intangible  heritage, conservation  and  preservation, traditional  institutions,  impacts of colonialism  and globalization, and contemporary issues in the management and safeguarding of Pacific heritage.


PA201           Pacific Heritage & Arts in Education 


Prerequisites: PA101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

Pacific epistemologies can be effectively applied within the teaching of cultural heritage and creative arts at school and in non-formal education contexts. Within this course, students apply knowledge and skills gained in first year courses to examine how pedagogic processes within the arts in formal and non-formal education can engage Pacific ways of knowing and being. This includes a consideration of multicultural, inclusive teaching practices and the instrumental use of the arts and heritage to support the development of learners in primary, secondary and special education contexts, as well as non-formal learning environments


PA202           Pacific Arts Practice 2 


Prerequisites: PA102

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This is the second course in the practical arts strand of the B.A Major. It adds on to the foundations established in PA101 and PA102. This course provides the essential bridge between art theory and studio practice for visual and performing arts students as well as those who are pursing the Arts as a teaching subject major in the Bachelor of Education (Secondary) programme.


PA203           Pacific Heritage Management 


Prerequisites: PA103

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines a range of heritage management approaches in Pacific including sacred places and spaces and the protection of, access to and management of heritage sites. It unpacks some of the tensions  between  western  and  indigenous  conceptions  of heritage,  cultural  rights,  indigenous  rights, collective ownership, intellectual property rights and cultural appropriation. An important component will be the examination of the applied dimension of Pacific heritage, including cultural identity and wellbeing, social capital and economic benefits through local community participation and heritage site assessments. Students will also gain an insight into responsive approaches based on shifting global and regional political, social, economic and environmental priorities.


PA301           Pacific Heritage & Arts in Community Development 


Prerequisites: PA201

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the role of Pacific arts and heritage activities in community development. Within this course, students extend their artistic and heritage practices and growing understanding of Pacific knowledge to community outreach programmes with a focus on sustainable development.  The potential role of heritage and arts initiatives will be examined across both urban and rural Pacific landscapes. The issue of inclusion will be of particular emphasis and students will be encouraged to consider the inclusion of special interest groups such as children, youth, women, the elderly and people with special needs.


PA302           Arts Production & Creative Practice Research  


Prerequisites: PA202

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an introduction to the role of creative practice, indigenous and other research methods in advancing our understandings of  cultural/indigenous knowledge  in  the  Pacific.  Students will engage with industry professionals to gain a sense of how they may further advance into an artistic career in the creative industries and broader cultural sector. Opportunities will be provided to examine compositional and choreographic strategies, rehearsal/studio approaches, interdisciplinary collaborative processes and artistic project organisation.  Students  will consolidate  their  skills  in  dance  and music;  or  visual  arts  through  the production and dissemination of live and digitally recorded; or exhibited work. This will extend their experience in publically presenting their own creative practices in the contemporary Pacific.


PA303           Contemporary Museology   


Prerequisites: PA203

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

The course introduces the role of museums as guardians of culture and contested sites of identity.  Students will examine social roles and responsibilities of museums and its extension into digital domains. The course seeks to provoke students into questioning what a museum is, what it does, and what a museum space can be. It does so by discussing the museum as source of information, educational institution, and venue for social advocacy. Hands-on practical training opportunities will include aspects of contemporary museum practice and students will curate, review and digitize an exhibition as part of a major project.


PA304           Heritage & Arts Internship   


Prerequisites: PA301

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

As a requirement of the work practice component of the BA major in Pacific Studies, Heritage and Arts, students will  work  in  an  approved  professional or community work environment.  This course aims to equip students with the practical skills and competencies required of professional Heritage and Arts practitioners. Students must complete a minimum of 200 hours in an approved organisation supported by a field educator.


PA402           Pacific Thought, Philosophy & Ethics                     


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

What is the applicability of Pacific knowledge systems and worldviews in the contemporary globalising world? This course illustrates that an understanding and recognition of the importance of Pacific thought, philosophy and ethics is crucial for the development of sustainable projects and policies over time. We will cover examples from the Pacific visual and performing arts, oral tradition, theology, literature, policy making, education and community development projects.


PA409           Representations of the Pacific                                  


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course aims to make sense of contrasting statements and images of the Pacific region, putting them into perspective in a contemporary light. What is their impact in Pacific societies, and to what extent do they determine contemporary actions within and with respect to the region?


PA418           Pacific Epistemology: Knowing & Being in Oceania


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

Fundamental in examining the unique ways of knowing in Oceania are questions such as: Do Pacific people have knowledge? What is knowledge in Pacific cultures? Where does this knowledge come from? Who is capable of ‘knowing’ in Oceania? Do men and women ‘know’ in the same way in Pacific cultures? Course readings will be drawn from the existing literature on Pacific ways of knowing, doing and being.


PA419           Contemporary Issues in the Pacific                         


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course aims to enhance understanding of the challenges and prospects facing the contemporary Pacific. It will explore issues of mobility and cultural identity; changing patterns of health and disease; and environmental changes that impact human welfare and sustainable livelihoods using an interdisciplinary approach that prioritises indigenous experiences, voices and perspectives.


PA423           Contemporary Pacific Arts                                         


Prerequisites: Admission into the Postgraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

What is ‘art’ in the Pacific and how can we examine it as expressions of Pacific ways of thinking and being? This course critically examines the concept ‘art’ and provides a social analysis of Pacific art over time as expression of Pacific cosmology, religion, migration, politics etc. Throughout the course students are introduced to the diversity and complexity of creative forms of expression in the Pacific as well as the contemporary arts that are made, stored and exhibited at the Oceania Centre for Arts, Culture and Pacific Studies.


PA600F         Pacific Studies SRP (Full-Time)                                                                                  



PA600P         Pacific Studies SRP (Part-Time)                                                                                 



PA700F         Pacific Studies Master’s Thesis (Full-Time)                                                           



PA700P         Pacific Studies Master’s Thesis (Part-Time)                                                          



PA750F         Pacific Studies DRP (Full-Time)                                                                                 



PA750P         Pacific Studies DRP (Part-Time)                                                                               



PA800F         Pacific Studies PhD Thesis (Full-Time)                                                                 



PA800P         Pacific Studies PhD Thesis (Part-Time)                                           



PAP01           Introduction to Heritage Conservation & Management          


Prerequisites: Admission into the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Offered only as in country project

This course will introduce participants to the diverse forms of heritage management in the Pacific and the multiple functionality that both cultural and natural heritage plays in defining, reinforcing and contributing to sustainable development in the Pacific Islands. The significance and scope of heritage resources in the contemporary Pacific and the wider global context will be discussed. They will review a number of strategies in responsive heritage leadership and management necessary for effective stakeholder engagement and good practice in the area of cultural heritage management.


PAP02           Heritage Stewardship & Sustainable Development in the Pacific


Prerequisites: Admission into the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Offered only as in country project

This is an elective course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme. In this course, participants will be introduced to a range of heritage management approaches in the conservation, access to and management of cultural and natural heritage. Participants will gain an insight into responsive approaches based on shifts in global and regional philosophical changes as well as Pacific political, social, economic, cultural and environmental needs. They will also gain hands-on learning opportunities to review the UN Heritage nomination process and submission requirements.


PAP03           Planning & Practice for the Cultural Curator


Prerequisites: PAP01 & PAP02

Semester 1: Not offered                                                 Semester 2: Offered only as in country project

This is an elective course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme.In this course, participants will learn about the concept and practice of stewardship from the dual perspectives of indigenous communities and national heritage safeguarding institutions. They will develop an understanding of and implications for good practice in cultural heritage management and conservation in the Pacific islands and beyond.


PAP04           The Political  Economy of Heritage Management                      


Prerequisites: PAP01 & PAP02

Semester 1: Offered only as in country project       Semester 2: Not offered

This is an elective course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme. In this course, participants will learn about the economic dimension of heritage practice. They will be introduced to the concepts of cultural economy, cultural and creative industries, and cultural statistics; and, will develop an understanding of the interrelated nature of these to heritage conservation, safeguarding initiatives, sustainable heritage tourism and economic development.


PAP05           Sustainability Issues in Heritage Management & Tourism     


Prerequisites: PAP01 & PAP02

Semester 1: Offered only as in country project       Semester 2: Not offered

This is an elective course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management Programme. In this course, participants will learn about the inherent relationship between heritage management, tourism and sustainable development in the Pacific. They will interrogate the importance of marketing and branding of heritage tourism in and for the Pacific islands and will learn how to develop action plans for collaborative work with tourism departments/authorities to ensure issues of authenticity and informed community consent are adhered to as well as general ethical heritage practice concerns and challenges.


PAP06           Heritage Project Management


Prerequisites: PAP01 & PAP02, plus any three of PAP03, PAP04, PAP05 or PAP06

Semester 1: Offered only as in country project       Semester 2: Not offered

This is the final compulsory course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management. It is an onsite internship component that requires participants to work closely with a senior heritage officer in conceptualising, developing, implementing, assessing and reporting on an action research project.


PAP07           Heritage Practicum: Field Research


Prerequisites: PAP01 & PAP02, plus any three of PAP03, PAP04, PAP05 or PAP06

Semester 1: Offered only as in country project       Semester 2: Not offered

This is the final compulsory course in the Professional Certificate in Heritage Management. It is an onsite internship component that requires participants to work closely with a senior heritage officer in conceptualising, developing, implementing, assessing and reporting on an action research project.


RT101            Rotuman Language & Culture 1                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                            Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an introduction to Rotuman language and culture. Students are taught basic grammar, vocabulary, sounds and standard orthography to help them speak, read, write and understand basic Rotuman. Language topics are tied to weekly socio-cultural themes: traditional counting, time, food, games, and song and dance among others. This course targets those with passive or no knowledge of the language. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to communicate confidently in Rotuman and demonstrate awareness on several aspects of Rotuman culture.


RT201            Rotuman Language & Culture 2                               


Prerequisites: RT101

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on RT101. Attention will be paid to further developing students’ knowledge of phonology, grammar and vocabulary. Language topics are tied to socio-cultural weekly themes that may include topics such as: myths and legends, superstition, the ‘new’ religion, illnesses and medicines, seasons and weather, and other relevant topics that will enrich students with not only knowledge of the culture, but also with the vocabulary to hold Rotuman conversations on more culturally complex ideas and topics.


RT311            Rotuman Ceremonies & Language                         


Prerequisites: RT201 or a working knowledge of Rotuman

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course delves into cultural rituals and practices associated with Rotuman ceremonies. It is divided into five main themes: birth, death, injuries and healing, chiefs, and marriage. It will also deal with the koua (earth-oven cooking style) and Rotuman chants – their significance and presentations/forms in respective rituals. The language part of the course will expand on the verb phrase from previous courses and the semantics of different types of verbs. By the end of the course, students should be able to demonstrate advanced knowledge of Rotuman rituals and practices, as well as the language.


RT321            Rotuman Literature & Writing                                 


Prerequisites: RT201 or a working knowledge of Rotuman

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course refines students’ vocabulary, grammar and writing skills.  Attention will be given to the writing of poems and essays, which will constitute a major assessment portfolio. The course will also focus on seminal texts and tales in Rotuman literature and songs and dances, as well as Rotuman proverbs and idioms. Also taught, in an attempt to expand students’ vocabulary, are antonyms, synonyms, homonyms, and variation. Each week revolves around a theme, ranging from gossip, hygiene, taboo to emotions, among others. By the end of the course, students should gain a deep appreciation of Rotuman literature.


TE113            Food Choice & Dietary Challenges                          


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

This course will provide an introductory approach to food, nutrition, health issues and challenges in the Pacific. The focus is on understanding the relationship of food to the physical and emotional needs of the individual as well as the economic and sociological framework of food production and consumption. The role of food in health and wellbeing, determining nutritional status and understanding the behavioural change on food choice will be examined. Strategies for nutritional improvements through the various cultural influences & social and economic impacts in the Pacific will be identified.


TE151            Introduction to Design & Computer Aided Design (CAD)


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This is an introductory course covering basic techniques, processes and practice in design. Concepts and topics offer comparative studies in the fine arts, graphic arts and industrial design, with particular applications to the Fashion, Foods, and Technology industries. This course adopts an interdisciplinary team-based approach, which promotes consideration of issues in the identified disciplines, providing for a broad-based learning experience. It encourages students to explore design as a systematic process of problem formulation, conceptual design, detailed design, prototyping, to the final design implementation.


TE155            Introduction to Technology Materials                   


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This is an introductory course on technology materials education. This course is designed to cover all necessary aspects concerning technology materials Apparel and Textiles, Food, Wood and Metal. The course aims to develop further the knowledge and skills necessary in working with technology materials.


TE156            Industrial Laboratory Practice 1                               


Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This is an introductory course covering the basic techniques, processes and practice in: (i) Apparel and Textiles, (ii) Food and Nutrition and (iii) Wood and Metals Technology. The contexts that influence the emphasis for each concept/topic to be explored are in the three (i, ii, iii) subject areas above and the following five categories: (a) Trade/craft skills, (b) Materials Technology, (c) Product Design, (d) Good Practice and for trainee teachers, (e) Teaching Methodology.


TE213            Nutrient Requirements & the Lifecycle                 


Prerequisites: TE113 and any 100  level Chemistry course

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course examines the principles of human nutrition, nutrition across the lifespan from both a biological and psychological perspective and impacts of over and under-nourishment related to macronutrients, micronutrients, glycemic responses, metabolic imbalance, antioxidants and the onset of nutrition related diseases as opposed to wellness. Sports nutrition related to hydration, energy requirements, muscle building and micronutrients will also be studied. Meal planning and calculations of dietary intakes compared to the recommended dietary allowances will be examined. Cultural food habits will also be discussed.


TE251            Product Development                                                 


Prerequisites: TE151

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: O at C

TE251 introduces students to ‘new product development’ (NPD) process, comprising two parallel but distinct focus areas. One involves idea generation, concept development, detail design and technical implementation (as explored in TE151); the other concerns business analysis and commercialisation. TE251 offers comparative studies in the Fashion, Foods and Technology industries through an interdisciplinary approach that helps consolidate learning through various broad-based experiences.


TE256            Industrial Laboratory Practice 2                               


Prerequisites: TE156

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: B at C

This course is designed to meet the demands and needs of OHS and safety regulations required in industrial workshops and labs, with emphasis on the correct usage, handling, storage, skills and application of portable power tools and equipment, material processes and practice. Technology Education covers, among other subjects (i) Apparel and Textiles,(ii) Food and Nutrition, and (iii) Wood and Metals Technology, which all require proficiency. Since these subjects are skill-based, the mastery of the skills through hands-on experience and practice is necessary.


TE313            Applied Nutrition in the South Pacific                    


Prerequisites: TE213

Semester 1: O at C                                                          Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on prior studies in nutrition science and will examine public health nutrition methods, techniques and tools of assessing nutritional and health status of individuals, communities and population. It will also assess the relevance and impact of public health policies in relation to lifestyle changes, nutrition transition, dietary patterns due to urbanization and health equity of Pacific islanders inclusive of effective nutrition intervention, strategies and plans, monitoring and evaluation. A field practical in the form of a mini survey to determine a community’s nutritional status will form the major part of the course.


TE351            Design & CADD Project                                               


Prerequisites: TE251

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on the knowledge and skills in TE151 and TE251, with emphasis on CADD skills and drafting techniques as applied to: (i) project drawings in architecture, civil, mechanical and electrical engineering, (ii) fashion and foods products. It also aims to develop the skills necessary to select, interpret and apply appropriate knowledge, concepts and techniques to bring project drawings and product presentations to successful completion.


TE356            Industrial Laboratory Project                                    


Prerequisites: TE256

Semester 1: B at C                                                           Semester 2: Not offered

This course adds to knowledge and skills covered in TE156 and TE256, on basic techniques, processes and practice in a typical industrial Lab. Each concept/topic is influenced by the context explored-craft or trade, technology, product design and good practice. This is a design-and-build course where students get the opportunity to exhibit their proficiency in the application of particular knowledge and skills acquired in other TE courses. This course aims to further develop the skills necessary to select, interpret and apply appropriate knowledge, concepts and techniques to complete a design-and-build project successfully.


TG111           Tongan and Niuafo’ou 1                                             


Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate Programme AND proficiency in Tongan

Semester 1: F at TON                                                      Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in the Tongan and Niuafo’ou languages, and develops their awareness of the phonological, orthographic, lexical and morpho-syntactic elements of the languages. Students will develop an understanding of the historical and social context in which Tongan and Niuafo’ou are spoken and written, the relationship between the two languages, and the extent to which they have changed over time. Students will survey the tools and resources that currently exist in the languages, and will learn to create contemporary materials using print-based and digital technologies.


TG211           Tongan & Niuafo’ou 2                                                 


Prerequisites: TG111

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: F at TON

This course builds on the knowledge and skills gained in TG111 in a contemporary context, and has applications of immediate relevance to a range of work-related contexts. It seeks to enrich students’ Tongan and Niuafo’ou vocabulary and grammar, enabling them to interpret and produce texts of greater complexity and richness, and helping them to understand the relevance of purpose, audience and focus. It tackles elements of language knowledge that enable students to move from concrete to abstract concepts, from restricted to elaborate language, and from surface-level to deep critical engagement with texts.


TG212           The Teaching of Tongan & Niuafo’ou                     


Prerequisites: TG111 or LN111 or LN118 and proficiency in Tongan

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Tongan and Niuafo’ou and the educational use of these languages across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way these languages are taught in schools in Tonga. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of the languages, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


TG311           Tongan & Niuafo’ou Texts & Translation             


Prerequisites: TG111 or LN111 (LL122) or LN118 (LL118) and proficiency in Tongan

Semester 1: Not offered                                               Semester 2: Not offered

This course seeks to develop new writing in the Tongan and Niuafo’ou languages on contemporary local, national and global issues. It develops the knowledge and skills required to create new texts that include culturally-appropriate research methodologies, critical thinking skills, the principles of translation, the creation of new terminology, and the ability to sustain a narrative throughout a text. At the end of the course, students will submit a bilingual text in either Tongan or Niuafo’ou and English for publication.


TG321           Tongan & Niuafo’ou Literature                               


Prerequisites:     TG111 or LT102 or LT104 or LT108 and proficiency in Tongan

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides an in-depth exploration of Tongan and Niuafo’ou literature. It enables students to engage with the works of seminal Tongan writers including Queen Salote Tupou III, Epeli Hau’ofa, and Konai Helu Thaman. Students will critique traditional Tongan literary techniques, particularly the art of Heliaki and draw relations between the construction of Heliaki and Tongan history, politics and culture. Students will examine Tongan literature from the 20th century to contemporary literature and analyse shifting values and change in the art of Heliaki and Tongan literature. Students will study fiction that will include traditional and contemporary poetry and prose.


TG331           Tongan & Niuafo’ou Epistemology, Values, Ethics                    


Prerequisites:     One 200 level course and proficiency in Tongan

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course examines the core elements of Tongan and Niuafo’ou worldviews, concepts, and values and their expression in significant Tongan and Niuafo’ou language texts.  It examines and contributes to debates on indigenous Tongan and Niuafo’ou research methodologies. It applies Tongan and Niuafo’ou research methods to a mini research project on an approved topic. The final assignment reports the results of this research in publishable form.


VA111           Bislama: The National Language of Vanuatu      


Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate Programme  and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2:  Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in Bislama, and develops their awareness of the phonological, orthographic, lexical and morphosyntactic elements of the language. Students will develop an understanding of the historical and social context in which Bislama is spoken, and the extent to which the language has changed over time. Existing resources in Bislama will be evaluated.


VA112           The Languages of Vanuatu                                        


Prerequisites: Admission to Undergraduate Programme  and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not Offered

This course provides a comprehensive study of Vanuatu’s linguistic complexity, as a hotspot of language diversity. It covers the demographics, status and role of indigenous and introduced languages. The linguistic relationships of these languages are studied, and the structural features of their sound and grammar systems are explored. The course looks at the extent of language endangerment, and strategies for maintenance and development. The language impacts of recent developments in educational policy are considered. Course participants will evaluate and develop resources that support the use of a selected vernacular language.


VA211           Bislama in Contemporary Times                              


Prerequisites:    VA111 or VA112 or LN118 or LN111 and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course builds on students’ existing knowledge and skills in Bislama, and develops their awareness of the nature, role and functions of Bislama in modern Vanuatu society.  It considers the proliferation of new and novel ways of using and writing the language, particularly in the light of pressure for a standardised form of the language to be more widely embraced. Through the use of archival and online research, students will survey the tools and resources that currently exist in the language, and will learn to create contemporary materials using print-based and digital technologies.


VA212           The Teaching of Vanuatu Languages                     


Prerequisites:    VA111 or VA112 or LN118 or LN111 and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course focuses on the teaching of Vanuatu vernacular languages, including Bislama, and the educational use of these languages across the content curriculum. It covers the theoretical principles and practical techniques needed by teachers, helping them create effective and dynamic lessons and resources that will transform the way languages are taught in schools across Vanuatu. The course provides teachers with confidence in their own knowledge of one or more languages, and the ability to pass on this knowledge to others in engaging and innovative ways.


VA311           Texts and Translation in Vanuatu Languages     


Prerequisites:    VA111 or VA112 or LN118 or LN111 and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course assists in the development of new writing in Vanuatu languages on contemporary local, national and global issues. It develops the knowledge and skills required to create new texts that include culturally-appropriate research methodologies, critical thinking skills, the principles of translation, the creation of new terminology, and the ability to sustain a narrative throughout a text. At the end of the course, students will submit a bilingual text in either Bislama or a Vanuatu vernacular and English or French for publication.


VA312           Topics in Vanuatu Languages                                   


Prerequisites:    VA111 or VA112 or LN118 (LL118) or LN111 (LL122) and working knowledge of Bislama

Semester 1: Not offered                                                Semester 2: Not offered

This course provides a comprehensive study of aspects of the structure of Vanuatu’s languages (Bislama and vernacular languages).  It will provide an opportunity for students to undertake more detailed analysis and documentation of a particular feature of one language known to them, as well as the preparation of a learning resource that will support the use of the language as it is taught to younger speakers in primary schools.