Undergraduate Literature Courses

We offer the following undergraduate Literature courses. Unless otherwise stated, these courses are offered both F2F at Laucala and online.

Completing a Bachelor of Arts with a single major in Literature requires passing: LT102, LT104, LT202, LT204, LT231, LT305, LT306, and LT307; plus either LT108 or LT331. (A student must also pass various UU courses.)

Completing a Bachelor of Arts with a double major (one of them Literature) requires passing: LT102, LT104, LT202, LT204, LT231, LT305, LT306, and LT307. (A student must also pass various UU courses.)

Completing a Bachelor of Arts with a Minor in Literature requires passing: LT102, LT202, LT305; plus LT307 or LT331.

Completing a Bachelor of Arts with a single major in Literature and Language requires passing:
LT102, LT104, LT202, LT204, plus two of LT305, LT306 or LT307. (A student must also pass various UU and LN courses.)

Completing a Bachelor of Arts with a double major (one of them in Literature and Language) requires passing:
LT102, LT104, either LT202 or LT204, plus one of LT305, LT306 or LT307. (A student must also pass various UU and LN courses.)

Completing a Bachelor of Education or BAGCED with a teaching subject major in Language and Literature requires passing: LT102, LT305, LT202 or LT204, plus LT306 or LT307. (A student must also pass various LN courses.)

LT102 Contemporary Literary Criticism: Key Terms & Texts 1

Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Offered: Semester 1

Coordinator (2024): Prof. Sudesh Mishra

This course introduces students to the key terms and concepts of contemporary literary criticism. Some may be familiar (such as Character), while others may be new (such as Ideology), but all will be considered in new and exciting ways. Students will be shown how to employ these key terms and concepts as analytical tools for unlocking a variety of texts. They will be invited to adopt different perspectives and viewpoints on the same text. By the end of the course, they will have developed a sound critical approach through the art of sustained thinking, reading and interpretation.

LT104 Islands 1: Real & Imaginary

Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Offered:  Semester 2

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Thomas Vranken

This introductory course takes as its focus texts and concepts relating to islands. Students will analyse a broad spectrum of material ranging from short stories, novels, diaries, memories, and histories to songs, images, plays, and films. The course is organised in two parts. The first is a survey of different types of islands, real as well as imagined, while the second accounts for the various character types that have become part of the familiar, often stereotyped, dramatis personae of island literature.

LT108 Introduction to Children’s Literature

Prerequisites: Admission into Undergraduate Programme

Offered: Semester 2

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Thomas Vranken

Students enrolled in this course will read and critically assess a selection of texts intended for non-adult readers. They will engage with a broad spectrum of narrative types and genres, including picture books, poetry, novels and graphic texts. This course demonstrates how children’s texts invite readers to take up positions that are never wholly innocent of ideology, ethics, contexts and cultural assumptions.

LT202 Contemporary Literary Criticism: Key Terms & Texts 2

Prerequisites: LT102 or LT104

Offered: Semester 2

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Anurag Subramani

Building on LT102, this course introduces students to more sophisticated key terms and concepts. Students will be shown how to employ these key terms as analytical tools for unlocking a variety of texts. They will be invited to adopt different perspectives and viewpoints on the same text. By the end of the course, they will have developed a more advanced critical approach through the art of sustained thinking, reading and interpretation.

LT204 Islands 2: Myths & Metaphors

Prerequisites: LT102 or LT104

Offered: Semester 1

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Anurag Subramani

Building on LT104, this course explores the founding myths and governing metaphors of island literature. It examines the special role of islands in various imaginative, philosophical and historical accounts: islands as spaces inspiring narratives of fantastic voyages and encounters with fabulous creatures; islands as locations for projecting idyllic worlds and communities; islands as testing-grounds for utopian and dystopian projects. Students will explore the role of the castaway myth in conceptions of the sovereign European subject, and its complex presence in colonial and postcolonial texts.

LT231 Film History and Theory

Prerequisites: At least one 100 Level course

Offered: Not offered 2024
Coordinator (2024): –

This is a course in film history and theory. It introduces students to seminal moments in cinema history, to important theoretical approaches in film studies as well as to key figures and movies in world cinema. By the end of the course, students will have a better understanding of film history, theory and film aesthetics as well as an appreciation of cinema from different parts of the world.

LT305 Others 1: Figures of Difference

Prerequisites: LT202 or LT204

Offered: Not offered 2024

Coordinator (2024): –

This course analyses representations of difference through the figure of the other, focusing on gender, race, nationality, life and humanity. It investigates the ways in which different narrative forms present and engage with notions of otherness, from women to slaves, from vampires to ghosts. Through close readings of novels, short stories, plays, poems and films the course will present thorough literary and theoretical pictures of the way in which we engage with the fear, attraction and mystique that surround otherness.

LT306 Others 2: Technologies of Difference

Prerequisites: Any LT course

Offered: Semester 1

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Thomas Vranken

This course explores literature’s relationship with technology. We will read stories from Europe, Oceania, and East Asia – stories about uncannily human-like robots, televisions watching people, disembodied communication devices, time machines, AI entities based on Fijian mythology, and the interaction of steam and spirits in nineteenth-century Hawaii – to think about how literature has influenced our perception of technology. We will also think about how writing, printing, and paper-making technologies have in turn shaped the books, magazines, and comics through which people encountered literature in the past as well as the digital screens that shape how we experience most of our text today.

LT307 Texts & Commodities

Prerequisites: LT202 or LT204

Offered: Semester 2

Coordinator (2024): Prof. Sudesh Mishra

Texts and commodities are closely interwoven entities. While cultural texts engage imaginatively with material worlds founded on the pursuit of commodities (such as sugar, slaves, spices, ivory, tea, oil and opium), they also circulate as commodities within a global marketplace. This course explores the relationship between texts and commodities in fiction and poetry from diverse commodity frontiers. Introducing students to new approaches in postcolonial, environmental and materialist criticism, it considers how different literary forms engage with the complex world history of various commodities.

LT331 Creative Texts

Prerequisites: At least one 200 level course

Offered: Semester 1 (F2F at Laucala only)

Coordinator (2024): Dr. Anurag Subramani

The aim of this course is to give students guided experience in the writing of short stories, poems, plays, screenplays, memoir, travel writing and other imaginative genres. It is intended as a practical exercise in creative skills and is not restricted to students of literature. Students from any department or school within the university may register.

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